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Linux

Picuntu 5.1 brings Ubuntu 14.04 to the MarsBoard RK3066 dev board

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Picuntu is a custom version of Ubuntu Linux designed to run on devices with Rockchip processors. That effectively lets you turn a cheap Android TV box into a full-fledged PC capable of running desktop apps such as LibreOffice, GIMP and Firefox.

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Linux engineer builds Raspberry Pi-based Piphone for $158

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

A LINUX ENGINEER has built the first smartphone based on a Raspberry Pi computer, and has cleverly named it the Piphone.

Liz Upton of the Raspberry Pi Foundation lauded the device in a blog post on Friday, largely due to the fact that it cost just $158 to build. What's more, the Piphone is constructed entirely from off the shelf components, which means "there's no soldering required, and no fiddly electronics work," she said.

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Linux Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

At the start of this quarter we looked at how 2013's graphics developments were more incremental than revolutionary, perhaps with the need for LTS stability in mind. Things are looking quite different this year, with several major changes quietly under way.

Last time, we identified XWayland's upstream status as a potential barometer of Wayland's desktop future. We'll look at what has recently landed and what's still to come.

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Banana Pi: The next generation of single-board computers?

Filed under
Development
Linux

The maker community loves the Raspberry Pi Single Board Computer (SBC). But, the $35 Raspberry Pi, which was introduced in 2012, with its 700MHz ARM11 processor and 512MBs of RAM, is looking a little dowdy these days. So, Lemaker.org has introduced the faster Banana Pi.

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LG opening up WebOS, Smart TV winning raves

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

When Korean consumer electronics giant LG purchased HP’s mobile Linux WebOS operating system in Feb. 2013 with vague plans to incorporate it in future “smart TV” designs, it seemed more like a death knell for the well battered distribution than a rebirth. After all, so-called smart TV platforms, such as LG’s own Linux-based Netcast, were minimalist affairs, and there didn’t seem to be much hope for innovative open source development on such a platform. Yet, not only has WebOS emerged as a potent contender for Internet TV, but LG has begun to release portions of the platform as open source.

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Swiss school invests open source savings in education

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The significant savings gained by using free and open source software in the school of the Swiss town of Villmergen are used to enhance the curriculum. Switching to free and open source has led to an increase in computers, motivating teachers to create their own courses. "Ubuntu Linux PCs are very easy to use and maintain, giving teachers more time to work with their students," says Martin Lang, the school's IT administrator.

The move to hassle-free software has created a virtuous circle, Lang says. Since most of the educational-applications created by the school are browser-based, teachers encourage students to bring their own computers. This again increases the number of PCs per classroom, making computer-aided teaching more attractive.

All teachers at the school can work with Ubuntu Linux, says Lang. "Changing their computer habits takes some effort, but they are motivated because of the increase in teaching possibilities."

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Enlightenment's Evas Adds OpenGL ETC2 Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

ETC2 is the lossy texture compression scheme developed by Ericsson that is royalty-free and is now mandated as part of the OpenGL ES 3.0 and OpenGL 4.3 specifications. For those unfamiliar with this alternative to S3TC, read ETC2 Texture Compression Looks Good For OpenGL.

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Getting started with Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux can be confusing to new users. There’s a lot of jargon, and some things are quite different from what you may be used to. To help you take your first steps, we’ve put together a series of videos to help you understand what’s going on in this OS. It covers everything you need to know from what it is, to how to install it, to knowing where to look on your first boot. You’ll be up and running in no time!

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New course to cater to Linux newbies

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As the use of GNU/Linux grows and spreads, training has become more and more of a necessity if one wants to join the burgeoning ranks of administrators.

Given this, it is not surprising that the Linux Professional Institute has added a new course for the rank beginner, a course called Linux Essentials. The LPI already has courses for three levels of certification; the new course is aimed at the newcomer.

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Does Linux Mint exist?

Filed under
Linux

This is not an attack against the Mintcast podcast or the Luddites as I like listening to their podcasts and I listed both of them in my top 9 Linux podcasts article.

I did feel it necessary to respond to their critique though as I felt many of the points weren't valid or needed qualifying.

As for the title of this post, that is definitely link bait. A title so vague that it draws people in.

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Security Leftovers

  • Samba flaw opens Linux systems to remote exploit

    A vulnerability in Samba, the standard Windows interoperability suite of programs for Linux and Unix, can be exploited remotely to gain access to Linux machines that have port 445 exposed.

  • UK cyber chief says directors are devolving responsibility for hacks {sic} [iophk: "a step towards banning Microsoft, yet the article closes with Microsoft talking points"]

    Ciaran Martin, the head of the agency's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), said it is unacceptable for boards to plead ignorance about the threat from cyber attacks.

  • Ransomware and the Internet of Things

    But it is a system that's going to fail in the "Internet of things": everyday devices like smart speakers, household appliances, toys, lighting systems, even cars, that are connected to the web. Many of the embedded networked systems in these devices that will pervade our lives don't have engineering teams on hand to write patches and may well last far longer than the companies that are supposed to keep the software safe from criminals. Some of them don't even have the ability to be patched.

    Fast forward five to 10 years, and the world is going to be filled with literally tens of billions of devices that hackers can attack. We're going to see ransomware against our cars. Our digital video recorders and web cameras will be taken over by botnets. The data that these devices collect about us will be stolen and used to commit fraud. And we're not going to be able to secure these devices.

  • Kodi 17.3 Security Update Patches Infamous Subtitle Hack, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Crash
    The second stable point release of the major Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center was launched the other day, on May 24, 2017, but it was missing some binary add-ons, so Martijn Kaijser announced today Kodi 17.3.
  • Samba vulnerability brings WannaCry fears to Linux/Unix