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Linux 2.6.39 RC1 debuts new block device plugging model

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  • Linux 2.6.39 RC1 debuts new block device plugging model
  • Linux 2.6.39 Kernel Merge Window Closes With -rc1
  • Kernel Log: First release candidate for Linux 2.6.39

New Mageia Forums Bring Community Together

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Web New Mageia forums were announced today as "the official portal for the Mageia community: support, distro testing reports, contributions, discussions...."

Red Hat targeting UK growth in 'non-traditional sectors'

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  • Red Hat targeting UK growth in 'non-traditional sectors'
  • Are Companies Evil?
  • Use the House's Money to Trade Red Hat
  • Beyond $1bn: Why Red Hat is a one off

Pinguy OS 10.10 (64 bit)

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Linux PinguyOS is one I hadn’t heard of until recently. It seems to be just a baby, in Linux distro terms, although I say that not due to size or its features, but because of its age. PinguyOS only came onto the scene sometime in 2010.

Slipping over the edge (w/ Fedora 15)

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cedarandthistle.wordpress: On a Sunday a few weeks ago, I finally decided to take the plunge and install the Fedora 15 Alpha on my primary workstation.

MEPIS 11 RC1: An Quick, Informal Glimpse

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linuxmigrante.blogspot: Even though I'm already running MEPIS 11 Beta 3 as my production system, I downloaded the RC version 1 to test it.

Dialog with the Girlfriend

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jeffhoogland.blogspot: About a year ago I made a post about installing Linux on my girlfriend's laptop. Just recently I was quoted on Linux Insider about how successful the installation had been a year later. I said that I believed it to have been a successful conversion of a Windows user to Linux.

Fixed ISO images for Debian 6.0.1 released

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Linux Post-release testing showed up a variety of bugs in the images produced for the 6.0.1 update release:

SimplyMEPIS 11.0 nears Final with RC1 Release

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Linux Warren Woodford has uploaded SimplyMEPIS 10.9.94, the first release candidate of MEPIS 11.0. MEPIS 11.0 RC1 is build from a Debian Squeeze stable foundation with the following major differences:

Debian Project News - March 28th

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Welcome to this year's fifth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include:

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More in Tux Machines

Linux-ready Qseven COM taps new Cortex-A15 Renesas SoC

iWave has announced an industrial temperature Qseven form-factor module that runs Linux on the new, dual-core, Cortex-A15 Renesas RZ/G1-M SoC. Bangalore, India based iWave Systems is typically associated here with SODIMM-style computer-on-modules based on Freescale SoCs, such as the iW-RainboW-G18M-SODIMM i.MX6UL. For its new iW-RainboW-G20M-Q7 module, iWave is branching out with a Qseven form factor COM built around the recently announced Renesas RZ/G series of ARM SoCs. Specifically, the iW-RainboW-G20M-Q7 module runs Linux on the dual-core, 1.5GHz RZ/G1M, which uses Cortex-A15 architecture, as opposed to the dual-core Cortex-A7 based RZ/G1-E. Read more

Gen 5 Briq mini-PC runs Black Lab Linux on Core i3 or i5

The slimmer, completely air-cooled Black Lab Briq Gen 5 mini-PC has Mac Mini-like specs and runs Black Lab Linux on a Core i3 or i5 CPU. PC/OpenSystems has offered a commercial version of the Black Lab Linux distribution since 2007, and sponsors Black Lab Software, which sells the community version. The company has now released its fifth generation of the Black Lab BriQ mini-PC. The system is pre-installed with the commercial version of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux, with prices starting at $450, including a three-year warranty. Read more

Google killing Chrome for 32-bit Linux

  • Google killing Chrome for 32-bit Linux
    If you live in the web browser, using a Linux-based operating system makes a lot of sense. By combining say, Ubuntu and Google Chrome, you can have a very secure and easy-to-use platform running the world's best web browser. A bloated and heavy Windows 10, for instance, could be unnecessary.
  • Google ends 32-bit Linux support for Chrome
    The first signs of the end of 32bit are on the wall - starting with Linux. I wonder how long Google will continue to support 32bit Chrome on Windows. For some strange reason, Microsoft is still selling 32bit Windows 10.
  • Google Decides to End Support for Google Chrome on 32-bit Linux OSes
    The brief announcement was made an hour ago by Dirk Pranke on the Chromium-dev group, and it informs users of Ubuntu and Debian GNU/Linux distributions that starting with March 2016, the Google Chrome web browser will no longer be available for 32-bit hardware platforms.

Does the Open Document Format still matter?

One of the core topics of this blog -at least one of the main reasons it came to existence- was open standards: their benefits, their advantages, and their value as a fundamental component for digital innovation and ultimately software freedom. This is still the case of course, but today I will try to show how one open standard in particular, ODF, has failed in its approach until now and could very well make a remarkable comeback. This is not to say that ODF is a bad idea or that it is not a good standard; it is all this and much more. However I have realized with the hindsight of several years since it became an official ISO standard that the expectations about its adoption and its development have been defined the wrong way. Hence the title of this post. Read more