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HandyLinux 1.6 - A sample of what you can achieve using the power of Debian

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Debian

HandyLinux was created using the Debian Live Build tools. This distribution shows you a small sample of what can be achieved with Debian.

HandyLinux was reasonably easy to install and there is a decent if not spectacular set of applications installed by default.

The HandyMenu will probably be useful for people who want a basic computing experience but for everyone else there is the inclusion of Whisker and Slingscold.

Using Debian Wheezy as a base makes the system a little bit limited in terms of available software. I would recommend using the testing branch as a base.

There were a couple of issues as highlighted but nothing too hard to fix. It would probably be a bit disconcerting for a really new user to hit the menu icon and for nothing to happen.

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Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code

Filed under
Development
Linux
Security

Beginning on Monday, the security of the Linux kernel source code has become a little bit tighter with the addition of two-factor authentication for the kernel's Git code repositories.

Contributing code changes to the Linux kernel sources at Kernel.org already required more than just a password, even before the change. Developers must use their own unique SSH public keys to login to the Git repositories. But not even this added security layer was truly failsafe – as the software's maintainers found out in 2011 when their servers were rooted.

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Loving Linux: Ain't Nothin' Like the 1st Time

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Linux

"My first real exposure to Linux was at a friend's house," said Linux Rants blogger Mike Stone. "He was trying to make a Macintosh he owned into a useful computer, so he'd dual-booted it with a version of Linux called MkLinux. I was absolutely fascinated by it and the FOSS philosophy, and after using his computer for a week or so, I looked into getting Linux [on] my own."

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Top Linux Productivity Apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Productivity is essential to anyone's day, no matter who you are or where you work. In this article, I'll be sharing some of my favorite Linux applications that I rely on to keep my productivity levels in check. I'll also share some of my rationale behind me recommending each application and why you might wish to consider it as well.

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A new report from IBM stacks up Linux container against KVM virtual machine performance.

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Linux

In the traditional hypervisor Virtual Machine (VM) approach that is used by VMware's ESX and open-source options like Xen and KVM, a host operating system runs the hypervisors, which then in turn requires an operating system of its own for VMs. The Docker model is a bit different in that only the host operating system is required and containerized apps then run on top of that OS.

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Tizen Samsung NX30 awarded European Connected Camera 2014-2015

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

The Samsung NX30 is a special bit of kit, with its excellent sharing smart camera features, quick focus of 0.3 seconds, but its now been confirmed again with the the Korean manufacturer being awarded European Connected Camera 2014-2015 by the European Imaging and Sound Association. See the Press Release Clip for further details.

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Systemd: Harbinger of the Linux apocalypse

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Linux

Now that Red Hat has released RHEL 7 with systemd in place of the erstwhile SysVinit, it appears that the end of the world is indeed approaching. A schism and war of egos is unfolding within the Linux community right now, and it is drawing blood on both sides. Ultimately, no matter who "wins," Linux looks to lose this one.

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10 years later, Munich may dump Linux for Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

A few years ago, Linux sites were buzzing that the city of Munich, Germany was going to kick Windows to the curb and roll out a Linux-based OS on all their government desktops. […]

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Raspbian explained

Filed under
Linux
Debian

That’s a little bit mind-boggling but I think I understand. So if Raspbian is a version of Debian, is there ‘pure’ Debian on Raspberry Pi?

Yes there is. In fact, there was Debian for Raspberry Pi before there was Raspbian. It was the version specifically designed for the CPU that the Raspberry Pi uses, as not every Linux distro has a version that will run on Raspberry Pi.

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Release: SymphonyOS 14.1 Now Available

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

We are happy to announce the release of SymphonyOS 14.1, the second release in the Phoenix series. This release includes several bugfixes over the 14.0 developer preview from earlier this year including. Update to an Ubuntu 14.04 base system Improved handling of menu generation and proper updating of the menu system when system changes occur Improvements to the logout functionality Replacement of Slim DM with LightDM Security updates to the local httpd Fixes to installation from DVD While this new release still receives a beta title and should not be considered stable it is a large step forward and we hope...

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More in Tux Machines

LXQt 0.12.0 Desktop Environment Released with Better Support for HiDPI Displays

The developers of the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) were proud to announce today the release and immediate availability for download of the LXQt 0.12.0 desktop environment. Read more Also: LXQt 0.12 released With Better HiDPI Support, More Robust

GNOME 3.27.1 RELEASED

GNOME 3.25.1, the first unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See below. If you want to compile GNOME 3.27.1 by yourself, you can use the JHBuild modulesets available here: Read more Also: GNOME 3.27.1 Released

today's leftovers

  • Another Million Learn About GNU/Linux
    Ordinarily, I would not notice or even recommend a brief article in a magazine but this is Popular Science, the Bible of DIY types especially the young and restless who might actually take the plunge into FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software). It’s a general magazine with a million subscribers.
  • Chromium 62 ready for download
    chromium_iconEarlier this week, Google released a security update for its chrome/chromium browser. The new version 62.0.3202.62 plugs the holes of 35 more or less serious issues, several of them have a CVE rating. When the topic of Chromium 62 came up in the comments section of a previous post, I mentioned that I was unable to compile it on Slackware 14.2. Errors like “error: static assertion failed: Bound argument |i| of type |Arg| cannot be converted and bound as |Storage|” yield some results when looked up on the Internet, and they indicate that Slackware’s own gcc-5.3.0 package is too old to compile chromium 62.
  • Playing with the pine64
     

    So I went for OpenBSD because I know the stuff and who to har^Wkindly ask for help. Spoiler alert, it's boring because it just works.

  • PrismTech Moves Market-Leading Proven DDS Solution to Open Source as Eclipse Cyclone
  • Nana Oforiatta Ayim’s Open-Source Encyclopedia of African History Starts With Ghana
    It is a rare kind of woman who enjoys a project so vast that it’s practically unfinishable, but Nana Oforiatta Ayim, a Ghanaian gallerist, writer, and historian, never quits what she has started. She’s discussing her work on the "Cultural Encyclopaedia", an attempt to “facilitate the re/ordering of knowledge, narratives, and representations from and about the African continent” through an online resource that includes an A-to-Z index and vertices of clickable images for entries. Eventually, a 54-volume book series—one for each country on the continent—will be published with selections from the encyclopedia's long, long list. Oforiatta Ayim is working with a small team of editors, and, starting with her native country, she has taken on the task of documenting all significant cultural touchstones in the thousands of years of African history. Plus, it will be open source to prevent it from having a top-down logic. “I’m a little bit crazy to take it on,” she says. “But if I’m not going to do it, who is going to be as crazy as me?”
  • The Only Person I’ll Pair Program with is my Cat
     

    I could argue (to varying degrees of success) that pair programming isn’t productive. Productivity of a practice is an easy thing to attack because, in our capitalist dystopia, it’s the end-all-be-all metric. But I hate pair programming, and it’s not just because I don’t feel productive. It’s a lot more than that.

  • Reaper: IoT botnet 'worse than Mirai' infects one million organisations worldwide
     

    Check Point first unearthed the botnet, codenamed 'IoT_reaper', at the beginning of September and claims that, since, it's already enslaved millions of IoT devices including routers and IP cameras from firms including GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Avtech, Netgear, MikroTik, Linksys and Synology.

  • Google will pay out bounties for bad Android app flaws
     

    "Google Play is working with the independent bug bounty platform, HackerOne, and the developers of popular Android apps to implement the Google Play Security Reward Program. Developers of popular Android apps are invited to opt-in to the program, which will incentivize security research in a bug bounty model," says HackerOne.

today's howtos