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GNOME's Virtual Filesystem Received gPhoto2 Pull Support

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Linux

GVFS 1.19.4 introduces pull support for gPhoto2 and implements truncate and seek support for output streams for the DAV (Distributed Authoring and Versioning) protocol.

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Is Amazon creating an Android game console?

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Linux

Amazon won’t say if it will be making an Android-based gaming device beyond its Kindle tablets. But it is certainly pushing hard to create tools for game developers so that they can be successful on the company’s various app platforms.

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Use the Raspberry Pi as a DIY Surveillance camera

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Linux

The official Raspberry Pi camera module is a Full HD camera that plugs into the Raspberry Pi via the Camera Serial Interface (next to the Ethernet port) on the device. The sensor on the camera is a 5MP with fixed focus lens. It can shoot still images with a maximum resolution of 2592×1944 as well as Full HD 1080p video @ 30 FPS and 720p video @ 60 FPS.

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A Collection of Secret Linux Humor

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Linux
Humor

Who says Linux nerds can't be funny? Enjoy this collection of amusing man pages and prank programs.

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Valve’s OpenGL debugger is being developed on Kubuntu along with Ubuntu & Linux MInt

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Linux
Gaming

Valve team is working on a new tool to facilitate game developers on Linux. VOGL is an OpenGL tracer/debugger which will be used to analyse OpenGL calls. VOGL was announced in the Steam Dev Days conference. The debugger is being developed on Linux natively. It will be an open source project.

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Meizu Russia confirms “Ubuntu rumors”

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Linux
Ubuntu

Yup, just as we’ve told you before, Ubuntu is coming to a Meizu smartphone near you. We still don’t have the official announcement, but details keep coming.

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Linux Kernel Updates Add Features for Mobile, Cloud, Big Data

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Linux

Linux kernel version 3.13, the latest release of the open source operating system, is out as of Jan. 20. Alongside the usual slew of code updates that only geeks can fully appreciate, this release brings with it some key new features that could impact the future of open source platforms for e-commerce, personal computing and more.

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Also: Linux 3.13 Improves Networking, Memory Performance

Linux: the future of gaming

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Linux
Gaming

Whether or not you think games are important for Linux, the stone cold reality is that they significantly drive mainstream interest in any operating system. As I wrote in the feature for LXF179, Linux: the Future of Gaming, this was a lesson Gabe Newell learnt back in the early 1990s while working for Microsoft – and it changed the direction of his career.

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PiPad: The Raspberry Pi tablet

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Linux

Makers love Raspberry Pi mini-board Linux computers. There's almost nothing you can't do with them. You can use them as a server, a universal language translator, and, even as a supercomputer. Now, believe it or not, someone's made the inexpensive Linux board for the heart of a tablet: the PiPad.

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Can Android Challenge Embedded Linux?

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Linux

A line should be drawn between true embedded Linux distros and Android's solitary distro adapted for embedded consumer functions, said Suse's Matthias Eckermann. He does not see Android going into enterprise areas involving integrated systems. "With flexibility, Android is one stack and one purpose. That is not the case with a full-fledged embedded Linux used for multiple purposes."

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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