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My new laptop is here! My preciousss!

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

dedoimedo.com: I've bought myself a new laptop. I'm so very pleased with it that I decided to write an article and show off my latest toy. It's also a great lesson in Linux, since the machine runs four operating systems, with the fifth on the way. So if you're in a mood for some ego-centric eye candy, do take a look.

Here's why I don't run Linux on my desktop

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Linux

gibsonandlily.com: Ah yes, Linux. The darling of the technology community. The glowing beacon perched atop the tower built of the hard-work, blood, sweet tears, and carpal tunnel leading the masses to the holy-land known as "open source". Proof positive that we don't need those greedy bastard corporations in order to get online and whine about how much we don't need those greedy bastard corporations godd*mnit!

One more Linux user, one less Windows support headache

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

linuxcritic.wordpress: My Aunt Jean has an older computer for which I have provided support in the past. What kind of support, you ask? You know. Sure you do. Windows XP support. “My computer has been running slower and slower lately, could you take a look at it?” and “Sound stopped working!” and “I think I may have a virus”.

Welcome to the Linux Generation

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Linux

bihlman.com: With our economy having its, well, ups and downs lately, you might be thinking “Is now really a good time to think about purchasing a new computer?” Meanwhile, software applications that once needed robust hardware to run are now moving on to the Internet. The result is an upturn in the purchase of netbooks and low powered “Internet Appliances”, most of which cost less than a really nice new shirt.

Free Software economics for Indigenous Nations

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Linux

Some of the surviving nations in North America have tried Casinos and call centers. Others have tried meat packing for freedom. Yet, unemployment remains high, over 80% for some communities, such as on the Lakotah reservations. Similarly, per capita income often remains below the poverty line. On the Lakotah reservations, per capita income is less than $4,000 annually. The exact story is of course different for each nation, but the overall results of these efforts have usually been rather bleak.
Could free software change things?

Read the full article at Free Software Magazine.

Make your own Wayback Machine or Time Machine in GNU/Linux with rsnapshot

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Linux

A good backup system can help you recover from a lot of different kinds of situations: a botched upgrade (requiring re-installation), a hard drive crash, or even thumb-fingered users deleting the wrong file. In practice, though I’ve experienced all of these, it’s the last sort of problem that causes me the most pain. Sometimes you just wish you could go back a few days in time and grab that file. What you want is something like the Internet Archive’s “Wayback Machine”, but for your own system. Here’s how to set one up using the rsnapshot package (included in the Debian and Ubuntu distributions).

Read the full howto at Free Software Magazine.

Atlanta Linux Fest 2009

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Linux

I interviewed Nick Ali, one of the great minds behind the Atlanta LinuxFest 2009. See what he has to tell us, and why you shouldn’t miss it if you’re lucky enough to be nearby on September 19th, 2009!

Read the full interview at Free Software Magazine

Top 10 Benefits of CentOS over Fedora

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Linux

blog.taragana.com: CentOS is often compared to Fedora in various Internet forums. Let's see 10 benefits of CentOS over Fedora.

Linux 2.6.31's best five features

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Linux

blogs.computerworld: Lately, most of the improvements in the Linux kernel have been for server users. In the latest release though, Linux 2.6.31, most of the best goodies are for Linux desktop users. Here's my list of the top five improvements.

Trisquel 3.0 STS Linux (Dwyn)

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Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: I came across another interesting Linux distribution today called Trisquel Linux. Trisquel is geared more toward Linux purists since it focuses on providing truly free software without any non-free stuff.

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