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Dell, Asustek and Lenovo eye Chromebook market

Filed under
Linux
Google

Seeing that Chromebooks are enjoying demand from the education sector, brand vendors such as Dell, Asustek Computer and Lenovo have started becoming aggressive about the market, while Acer, Hewlett-Packard (HP) and Samsung Electronics will also launch new products to defend their market shares, according to sources from the upstream supply chain.

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Linux computer program brings a smile where it's least expected

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Using Linux as the operating system has not been a matter of religion or partisanship. Not even a matter of personal choice. It's a matter of pragmatic necessity. To give you a better picture of why, here's the story of Ricky.

In short: We installed a computer for a financially-disadvantaged kid. We taught that kid how to use the computer. That kid was supremely happy with his new Linux computer. We left. The end.

First, we started with Windows XP, then we moved to nothing but Linux because Microsoft refused to sell us licenses that were cheap enough to make our organization viable. Also, in less than a week of uses Windows, we were flooded with calls from parents complaining about viruses and malware. At that time, we were placing six computers in homes per week, so the complaints were a logistics nightmare for us.

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Three Outstanding Music Streaming Clients for Linux

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Linux

That’s right, Linux can get that music stream to your desktop in many ways. If you’re a lover of Spotify, Pandora, Last.fm, SoundCloud...you name it, there’s a way to stream that music. But don’t think you’re limited to using a web browser. Linux has clients, and plenty of them.

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Windows, Linux ARM servers are on their way to the data center

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Some people can't believe that Microsoft is working on a version of Windows Server for ARM processors. I only wonder what took the software giant so long.

True, when you think of ARM processors your mind immediately goes to smartphones and tablets, but 64-bit ARM processors can do far, far more than tweet your latest photo to your followers. Server hardware companies such as Dell and HP have been working on 64-bit ARM as a future data center platform for years.

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LxPup 14.10 Is a Ridiculously Small Distro Based on Puppy Linux and LXDE

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Linux

Puppy Linux is one of the smallest and one of the lightest distributions that can be found. It's been out of the news lately and it's not getting the same kind of attention that it used to have, but the OS is actually utilized as a base for numerous distros. LxPup is just one of them, but it has been very well received by the community and users really seem to like it.

LxPup is a very interesting project because it comes with a variety of flavors that are quite different from one another. Despite being a rather small OS, the developers have put together a number of different revisions aimed at users with different configurations, both with PAE and non-PAE support.

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Pi-Top is a Raspberry Pi laptop you will learn to build yourself!

Filed under
Linux

This wonderful project explores the borders between hacking, learning computers, hacking and electronics: it’s a kit you can hack and a learning course you can use to teach people how to create real hardware.

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Announcing Qubes OS Release 2!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Today we're releasing Qubes OS R2! I'm not gonna write about all the cool features in this release because you can find all this in our wiki and previous announcements (R2-beta1, R2-beta2, R2-beta3, R2-rc1, and R2-rc2). Suffice to say that we've come a long way over those 4+ years from a primitive proof of concept to a powerful desktop OS which, I believe, it is today.

One of the biggest difficulties we have been facing with Qubes since the very beginning, has been the amount of this extra, not-so-exciting, not directly security-related work, but so much needed to ensure things actually work. Yet, the line between what is, and what is not-security related, is sometimes very thin and one can easily cross it if not being careful.

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Test drive Linux with nothing but a flash drive

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Linux

Maybe you’ve heard about Linux and are intrigued by it. So intrigued that you want to give it a try. But you might not know where to begin.

You’ve probably done a bit of research online and have run across terms like dual booting and virtualization. Those terms might mean nothing to you, and you’re definitely not ready to sacrifice the operating system that you’re currently using to give Linux a try. So what can you do?

If you have a USB flash drive lying around, you can test drive Linux by creating a live USB. It’s a USB flash drive that contains an operating system that can start from the flash drive. It doesn’t take much technical ability to create one. Let’s take a look at how to do that and how to run Linux using a live USB.

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Manjaro 0.8.10 Receives Its Twelfth and Final Update Pack

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Linux

The Manjaro developers are already preparing to launch a new edition of the operating system, but they are having some problems with a few of the packages they intend to implement. So, in the meantime, they are working to improve the current branch of the OS, 0.8.10. There is nothing really major in the update pack, with the exception of a few kernel updates, but it doesn't mean that it's not a good idea to upgrade nonetheless.

Manjaro 0.8.10 has been around for more than six months and numerous update packs have been made available until now. Some of them have been bigger than others, but the latest is smaller and it should be easy to get.

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Huge Computer Retail Chain in the UK Denies Warranty If Users Install Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A customer was denied warranty for a desktop computer, in a major computer store in the UK, because he had deleted the pre-installed Windows OS and had Linux on it.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox 58

  • Latest Firefox Quantum release available with faster, always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection and new features
    We accept things in the online world that we wouldn’t accept in the physical one. For instance, how would you feel if you popped your head in a store and that store now had the ability to keep sending you flyers even if you didn’t buy anything? Online, we often visit sites that track us, but it isn’t clear when this is happening or how the information is being used. Adding insult to injury, this often invisible tracking actually slows down web pages.
  • Firefox 58 Arrives With Continued Speed Optimizations
    Mozilla has set free Firefox 58.0 today as their latest "Firefox Quantum" release that continues work on being a performant web browser.
  • Firefox Quantum 58 builds on performance gains, improves screenshots tool
    Mozilla is rolling out Firefox Quantum 58.0 for desktop, along with Firefox for Android 58.0. It arrives over two months after the landmark release of Firefox Quantum 57.0. The latest build focuses on performance and security, while an update to Firefox’s user profile feature means it’s no longer backwards compatible with previous versions. Android users also gain the ability to pin favorite websites to their home screen for use like native apps.
  • Firefox 58 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows
    The Mozilla Foundation has made Firefox 58 files available for download on its official FTP servers. An official announcement will be made later today when the organization will also release the final changelog.
  • Browse without baggage in Firefox: Set Tracking Protection to always on
    We just can’t stop making Firefox faster — and with our most recent release, we also made it easier for you to control how much you’re tracked.
  • Firefox 58: The Quantum Era Continues
    2017 was a big year for Mozilla, culminating in the release of Firefox Quantum, a massive multi-year re-tooling of the browser focused on speed, and laying the groundwork for the years to come. In 2018, we’ll build on that incredible foundation, and in that spirit our next several releases will continue to bear the Quantum moniker. Let’s take a look at some of the new goodies that Firefox 58 brings.

LibreOffice 6.0 Will Launch with Many Design Improvements, Use Elementary Icons

The major LibreOffice 6.0 release is coming next week, and The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders talked with members of the community to get their perspectives on LibreOffice's new design. While it won't bring a massive redesign, as most users may have expected, LibreOffice 6.0 will include a few noteworthy design changes, including new table styles, new gradients, updated motif/splash screen, improved Notebookbars, menu and toolbar improvements, and the Elementary icons. Read more

Linux Foundation introduces the LF Networking Fund, harmonizes​ open source, open standards

The Linux Foundation is taking the first step to bring some commonality across its myriad network efforts by creating the LF Networking Fund (LFN). By creating a combined administrative structure, Linux Foundation said LFN will provide a platform for cross-project collaboration. LFN will form the foundation for collaboration across the network stack: the data plane into the control plane, to orchestration, automation and testing. Read more

Openwashing Surveillance

  • Facebook Open Sources Detectron Object Detection
    The way big companies are open sourcing significant AI is both gratifying and slightly worrying. AI is the biggest revolution since we discovered fire and started making tools. FaceBook AI Research has added to the list of what is available by open sourcing its Detectron project.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection research
    Facebook's artificial intelligence research (FAIR) team today announced it would open-source its object detection platform Detectron, as well as the research the team has done on it.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection work: Watch out, Google CAPTCHA
    acebook has brought us one step closer to a Skynet future made a commitment to computer vision boffinry by open-sourcing its codebase for object detection, Detectron. Written in Python and powered by the Caffe2 deep learning framework, the codebase – which implements object-sniffing algos such as Mask R-CNN and RetinaNet – is available under the Apache 2.0 licence.