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Linux

Wearing LG's webOS smartwatch made me happy

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Linux

I don't know what to say. What I just experienced was inexplicable. After Android Central revealed the news that Audi's car-unlocking smartwatch (built by LG) runs webOS, I made an immediate dash to the nearby stand of TTs and asked the friendly German demo dude if I could borrow his watch for a moment. More surprising than his consent was the actual software running on this watch: it's webOS with a level of maturity and polish that betrays the fact LG has been working on the UI for quite a while. The animations are smooth and fast, and the look is tailored to fit a round watch face.

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Linuxy Hopes and Dreams for an Inferno-Free 2015

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Linux

In 2015, "I predict that an avalanche of governments using FLOSS and GNU/Linux will take place in Europe," said blogger Robert Pogson. "FLOSS is widely accepted there, and with adoption of ODF becoming widespread, FLOSS and GNU/Linux are poised for a breakthrough." China, India and Russia, meanwhile, will "make major moves to adopt GNU/Linux for general governmental purposes including education."

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

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Linux

Given the ongoing controversy within the Capsicum developer community and the corresponding lack of specification of key features, and given the existence of capabilities that already perform a similar function in the kernel and the invasiveness of Capsicum patches, Eric was opposed to David implementing Capsicum in Linux.

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Harman brings Linux based IVI to entry-level cars

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Linux

Harman’s Linux-based IVI system for entry-level cars integrates Aha Analytics, and supports Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, and MirrorLink connectivity.

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A Device Blind Users Will Love

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Linux
Moz/FF

In Firefox OS we have a suite of core apps called Gaia that is the foundation for Firefox OS’s user interface. It is really one giant web app, perhaps one of the biggest out there. Since our mission dictates that we make our products accessible, we have embarked on that journey, we created a screen reader for Firefox OS, and we got to work in making Gaia screen-reader friendly. It has been a long and sisyphean process, where we would arrive at one module in gaia, learn the code, fix some issues, and move on to the next module. It feels something like this:

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Linux Mint 17.1 “Rebecca” KDE released!

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GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 17.1 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

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Inside HP's NFV Strategy [VIDEO]

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GNU
Linux
Server

HP is active in many areas where NFV will fit, including the OpenStack cloud and the Linux Foundation's OPNFV effort. In a video interview with Enterprise Networking Planet, Gillai explains how the various pieces of HP's NFV strategy fit together.

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3D printer dev kit runs Linux on new Marvell ARMv7 SoC

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Linux

Marvell announced the first Linux-based hardware/software development kit for 3D printers, built around a new, 533MHz “88PA6120″ ARMv7 SoC.

Marvell’s 3D Printer SoC Solution, also known as the Marvell 88PA6120 3D Printer Development Kit, provides a complete reference kit for turnkey development of 3D printers, says Marvell. The hardware platform is built around a new Marvell 88PA6120 SoC clocked to 533MHz. The company did not offer processor details, but said it is an ARMv7 compatible processor.

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LG May Be Dropping Google's Android For Its Next Generation Of Smartwatches

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Android
Linux
Gadgets

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that LG is planning on dropping Android Wear–Google's operating system for smartwatches–in favor of WebOS, its own operating systems found in its smart TVs. According to an anonymous source speaking to the Journal, WebOS will be used in a new line of LG smartwatches released sometime in early 2016. LG already has two smartwatches operating on Android Wear: G Watch and G Watch R.

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Firefox OS to fuel Panasonic TVs, Chromecast-like devices

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Linux
Moz/FF

Panasonic will embed Firefox OS in its 2015 smart TVs, and Matchstick announced a Chromecast-like Firefox OS platform, to be used by Philips/AOC and TCL.

Aside from some modest success for Mozilla’s Firefox OS, Mobile Linux operating systems not called Android haven’t gotten very far on smartphones. Yet an assortment of Linux-based OSes — of which Android is but one — increasingly dominate the smart TV market.

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Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more