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Linux 3.17-rc6

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Linux

It's been quiet - enough so that coupled with my upcoming travel, this
might just be the last -rc, and final 3.17 might be next weekend.

Of course, that still depends on what happens - if we have something
scary coming up next week, I may have to delay things. But as it looks
right now, we're all good to go.

The shortlog is appended, but the view from ten thousand feet is
pretty normal: a bit more than half is drivers (gpu, sound, iio,
media, usb), just under a third is arch updates (arm, mips, x86), and
the rest is mainly filesystem updates (gfs2, cifs, btrfs, nfs).

Nothing particular stands out, and I'm not aware of any big pending
issues either. So please go out and test, because this *should* all be
pretty close to release.

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F2FS Tools Gain FSCK Support

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Linux

The F2FS Tools v1.4.0 release introduces fsck.f2fs for fixing corrupted images/partitions for Samsung's Flash-Friendly File-System. There's also now dump.f2fs for retrieving a specific file. Additionally, the f2fs-tools 1.4 update also has bug-fixes for the stat and fibmap utilities. Last but not least is some code refactoring for the Android build. The release was mentioned today on the kernel mailing list by Samsung's Jaegeuk Kim.

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Why I love Linux — even if I no longer use it

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Linux

Thinking about this, I remembered how much I loved (and still love) Linux. And I had to reminisce. I remember being a pimply high school kid circa 2002 and configuring Gentoo Linux by hand — kernel and all — onto my little beige eMachines computer, losing days of actual productivity in the process. And loving it. I remember diving into forums and arguing, however ineptly, over the merits of KDE over Gnome. I remember never quite mastering the command line, but getting pretty damn good at it. It let me do whatever I wanted, and my friends didn't get it. Back then, I was open source. Linux was safer, better, and cooler than the competition. We were gonna win the desktop. One day! I had my quiet, nerdy rebellion moment compiling code for hours when my friends were playing World of Warcraft. And I loved every minute of it.

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Linux Kernel 3.16.3 Becomes the Newest and Best Stable Version Available

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Linux

Linux kernel 3.16.x is a relatively new release, but it was already adopted by a number of Linux distributions and it's available in the repositories for many others. The third release in the series is a little bigger than the previous one, but not much. In any case, it's going to be an interesting update nonetheless.

Even if the first update for this branch has been rather smaller, the development seems to have picked up a little and more changes and improvements have been made in the meantime.

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RELEASE: NETRUNNER ROLLING 2014.09

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GNU
Linux

Netrunner Rolling 2014.09 – 32bit and 64bit versions have been released.

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REVIEW: How to turn a Raspberry Pi in to an NSA-proof computer

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Linux

One of the Pi's key attributes is its price of around £30. It is the nearest thing we have to a disposable computer and several can be used cost-effectively in a single project.

A recently publicised use is the creation of a string of Raspberry Pi honeypots for detecting hacker activity on a corporate network.

Given CW's enduring preoccupation with the surveillance programs of our Establishment masters, would it be, could it be possible to create a disposable, network-invisible computer?

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Tizen Development Units now available!

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Development
Linux

The Linux Foundation have today announced the next round of the Tizen development unit program is now available, with the Intel NUC and Samsung RD-PQ hardware devices being available. The Idea behind this program is to put the required hardware in developers hands so they can develop and test their applications on real hardware. It has to be noted that the Samsung RD-PQ device does not have GSM connectivity, and therefore can not be used as a real world device, which is a pity as developers do need real devices so late in the game.

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Manjaro Linux 0.8.10 Ascella XFCE Edition : Video Review and Screenshots

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Manjaro Linux 0.8.10 Ascella XFCE Edition is the latest version of manjaro linux distribution with XFCE desktop environment. Manjaro Linux is a fast, user-friendly, desktop-oriented operating system based on Arch Linux. Key features include intuitive installation process, automatic hardware detection, stable rolling-release model, ability to install multiple kernels, special Bash scripts for managing graphics drivers and extensive desktop configurability.

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Understanding and Using Systemd

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Linux

Like it or not, systemd is here to stay, so we might as well know what to do with it.

systemd is controversial for several reasons: It's a replacement for something that a lot of Linux users don't think needs to be replaced, and the antics of the systemd developers have not won hearts and minds. But rather the opposite, as evidenced in this famous LKML thread where Linus Torvalds banned systemd dev Kay Sievers from the Linux kernel.

It's tempting to let personalities get in the way. As fun as it is to rant and rail and emit colorful epithets, it's beside the point. For lo so many years Linux was content with SysVInit and BSD init. Then came add-on service managers like the service and chkconfig commands. Which were supposed to make service management easier, but for me were just more things to learn that didn't make the tasks any easier, but rather more cluttery.

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Samsung to Launch Tizen based Smartphone in India in November 2014

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Linux

It looks like a Tizen Smartphone launch in India is on the cards, and the launch date is November 2014 for our Linux based friend. Samsung believe that they can use content to differentiate themselves from the competition, enabling them to maintain their lead in the Indian Smartphone market. We are not expecting the launch of the Samsung Z at this point, but more likely the budget Tizen Samsung SM-Z130E or SM-Z130H.

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.