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LLVMLinux Works To Make More Code Clang-Compatible With Linux 3.18

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Linux

On top of some separate patches to make the mainline 64-bit ARM Linux kernel closer to building under Clang, a separate pull request was sent in for the Linux 3.18 kernel that works to make other areas of the kernel's massive code-base more compatible with the LLVM/Clang compiler.

The LLVMLinux project remains dedicated to making the Linux kernel compatible with LLVM's Clang as an alternative to using GCC. Using this alternative compiler can yield faster build times, lower memory usage, static analysis capabilities, and for making the kernel's code more portable across compilers. Read more in my recent Building The Linux Kernel With LLVM's Clang Yields Comparable Performance article.

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Cumulus Linux 2.5: A Cisco-killer in the data center

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Linux

Cumulus Linux 2.5, designed for white-box data center hardware, helps Hadoop, VMware, and OpenStack users ramp up their networking

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Linux Mint 17 Now Lets Users Bookmark Folders in a Different Sidebar Section

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Linux

The ability to bookmark drives or other locations in the file manager should be something standard. Surprisingly, it's not a feature that's present everywhere and it lacks flexibility. Let's take the example of Ubuntu, which is used as the base of Linux Mint. Users can make bookmarks, even if it's a Samba directory, but they can't move them. This can be annoying, if you really want the power to change everything you want.

Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, but it doesn't use the same file manager. In Ubuntu it's Nautilus (Files) from the GNOME project, but on Linux Mint it's Nemo. The two are very different and they provide various options for their users.

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Rolling-release testing

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GNU
Linux

At the time of writing each operating system in my trial has been up and running for a few days. About once a week I will update each system and take note of what does or does not work. At the moment I plan to focus on whether each system is still able to boot after an update, whether I will be able to login to a graphical desktop and browse the web using Firefox and edit documents using LibreOffice. I am open to suggestions as to other tests readers may want me to perform. During this trial I will be posting observations on events as they happen on my Twitter feed as regular updates seem appropriate for a trial involving rolling-release distributions. I will also post updates on the experience here on weeks when something of significance happens.

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3.8 Million Raspberry Pi Linux Computers Sold - Oh My!

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Linux

I own three Raspberry Pi's (two B's and one B+) and many people I know also own one or more Pis. All those Pi add up and now the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that it has sold 3.8 million units.

That's a whole lot of Pi.

The Raspberry Pi was never supposed to be a massive volume seller. It was supposed to be a teaching and educational tool to help get kids (and adults) interested in development and maker culture.

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Now, Zen Mobile to launch low cost Firefox smartphone in October

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Linux
Moz/FF

Just few weeks into the unveiling of the first Firefox OS device in the the Indian market, Mozilla announced further partnerships with popular mobile device brands and app partners in India to launch new smartphones and content services.

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CAINE Linux Distribution Helps Investigators With Forensic Analysis

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Linux

There is no shortage of Linux distributions to serve specific markets and use cases. In the security market, a number of Linux distributions are widely used, including Kali Linux, which is popular with security penetration testers. There's also CAINE Linux, which is focused on another area of security. CAINE, an acronym for Computer Aided INvestigative Environment, is a Linux distribution for forensic investigators. Instead of penetration testing tools, CAINE is loaded with applications and tools to help investigators find the clues and data points that are required for computer security forensics. Among the tools included in CAINE are memory, database and network analysis applications. CAINE is built on top of the Ubuntu Linux 14.04 distribution that was released in April. Rather than use the Ubuntu Unity desktop environment, CAINE uses the MATE desktop. The CAINE 6.0 "Dark Matter" operating system was first released on Oct. 7 and includes new and updated applications to help forensics investigators. CAINE can be run as a live image from a CD or USB memory stick and can also be installed onto a user's hard drive. In this slide show, eWEEK examines some of the key features of CAINE 6.

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Machine vision COM and cameras go Linux

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Linux

Vision Components has launched two Linux-based, smart machine vision cameras and a COM built around a Xilinx Zynq SoC, each supporting up to 4.2MP video.

Over the last decade, smart cameras for machine vision have been transitioning from DSPs to systems that combine DSPs or FPGAs with ARM or x86 processors running Linux. The latest to join the Linux camp is Ettlingen, Germany based machine vision manufacturer Vision Components, which with its latest “VC Z” cameras has switched from a DSP-based system to a tuxified ARM/FPGA combo. Thanks to the Xilinx Zynq, the company was able to accomplish this with a single system-on-chip. The VC Z is available in a VCSBC nano Z computer-on-module, which also appears to act as the foundation for the new VC nano Z and VC pro Z cameras.

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And Now for Something Completely Different

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GNU
Linux

Similarly, "there is no answer better than, 'any distro that works for you, has more than two users and has good information and forums online,'" suggested Google+ blogger Gonzalo Velasco C.

For fans of free and open source software, "the present year has been one of philosophical questioning about the future of GNU/Linux, freedom of choice and 'market' share," he pointed out. "So, the answers will reflect this."

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Scientific Linux 7.0 x86_64 released

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Linux

Fermilab's intention is to continue the development and support of
Scientific Linux and refine its focus as an operating system for
scientific computing. Today we are announcing the release of Scientific
Linux 7.

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Linux Microsoft Office Alternatives

Despite what you may have been led to believe, there are in fact a number of solid Linux alternatives for Microsoft Office available. In fact, there are even options available with varied levels of docx support, if that is something relevant to your business. This article will explore my recommended Microsoft Office alternatives for Linux. Some of them you've likely heard of, others may be cloud/server based options that you might not have thought much about until now. Read more Also: The best open source video editors 2018: free to download, edit, use and share

Security: Updates, WordPress, Hardware Patches, and Open Source Security Podcast

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • WordPress 4.9.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.9.2 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. An XSS vulnerability was discovered in the Flash fallback files in MediaElement, a library that is included with WordPress. Because the Flash files are no longer needed for most use cases, they have been removed from WordPress.
  • Debian-Based SolydXK Linux OS Receives Patch for Meltdown Security Vulnerability
    The Debian-based SolydXK Linux operating system has been updated today with patches for the Meltdown security vulnerability, as well as various other new features and improvements. To mitigate the Meltdown security exploit that allows a locally installed program to access the memory, including the kernel memory, and steal sensitive information like passwords and encryption keys, the SolydXK 201801 ISO images are now powered by the latest kernel release with patches against this vulnerability.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Now Patched Against Meltdown & Spectre Security Vulnerabilities
    It's time for users of the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system to patch their systems against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities as new kernel updates landed today in the repos. Publicly disclosed earlier this month, the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities are affecting us all, but OS vendors and OEMs are trying their best to mitigate them so that no user can be the victim of attacks where their sensitive data is at risk of getting in the hands of the wrong person.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 78 - Risk lessons from Hawaii

GNOME Devs to Users: Desktop Icons Are Moving to GNOME Shell with GNOME 3.28

There appears to be a lot of fuss lately about the removal of an option from the GNOME desktop environment that allows users to display icons on their desktops. Long story short, last month, near the Christmas holidays, GNOME developer Carlos Soriano shared his plans on removing a so-called "the desktop" feature from the Nautilus file manager starting with the upcoming GNOME 3.28 release of the desktop environment, proposing its integration into the GNOME Shell component. The feature is there to handle application icons on the user's workspace, but it shouldn't have been implemented in Nautilus in the first place, according to the developer. So for the GNOME devs to be able to add new features to the Nautilus file manager, they need to remove its ability to handle desktop icons and place the code somewhere else. Read more