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The First Alpha Is Out Of The Qt5 Moonlight Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Moonlight v0.5 Alpha is the first release and its aimed at hackers and developers wishing to forward their dream of "a simple, lightweight, functional and beautiful desktop environment." Moonlight is written against the Qt5 tool-kit and the desktop environment is designed to be very modular. Moonlight shares some goals and code with the LXQt lightweight desktop project.

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Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 almost done!

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

KDE Frameworks 5 is due out today, the most exciting clean-up of libraries KDE has seen in years. Use KDE classes without brining in the rest of kdelibs. Packaging for Kubuntu is almost all green and Rohan should be uploading it to Utopic this week.

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Benchmarking Deepin 2014 With DDE 2.0 Using Linux Games

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Moz/FF
Gaming

The Deepin Desktop Environment is written using Google's Go language and makes use of heavy HTML5. DDE also uses Compiz as its compositing window manager. As in the past some desktop environments / window managers have impaired the full-screen Linux gaming performance, I ran some simple Linux gaming benchmarks on Sunday to see if the Deepin 2014 performance differed at all from upstream Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Ubuntu 14.04 was tested with the stock Unity 7.2 desktop using Compiz, GNOME Shell 3.10.4, and Xfce 4.10 all from the stock Trusty Tahr archive.

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Using Udev Without Systemd Is Going To Become Harder

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Gentoo

Samuli Suominen of Gentoo expressed some hesitation about this change, "I'd really hate to be forced to fork (or carry huge patchset) unnecessarily (I'm not a systemd hater, I'm not a eudev lover, I'm simply working on what is provided to me by *you*, udev upstream)." Lennart countered, "Oh god. You know, if you come me like this as blame me that I would 'force' you to do something, then you just piss me off and make me ignore you. Anyway, as soon as kdbus is merged this i how we will maintain udev, you have ample time to figure out some solution that works for you, but we will not support the udev-on-netlink case anymore. I see three options: a) fork things, Cool live with systemd, c) if hate systemd that much, but love udev so much, then implement an alternative userspace for kdbus to do initialiuzation/policy/activation. Also note that this will not be a change that is just internal between udev and libudev. We expect that clients will soonishly just start doing normal bus calls to the new udev, like they'd do them to any other system service instead of using libudev. Good luck."

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Linux Kernel 3.14.11 Is Now an LTS (Long-Term Support) Release

Filed under
Linux

“I'm going to be maintaining the 3.14 kernel as a ‘longterm’ kernel for the next two years, so mention that on the kernel.org site,” Greg Kroah-Hartman said in a short email on July 3, 2014...

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Ubuntu saves Munich millions -- should all governments switch to Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Trust in government is not exactly at an all-time high. Sure, there are oppressive governments such as Iran and China that filter and block web content, but even the USA has a spotty record. With all the news of PRISM and other spying programs, it is hard to tell which way is up anymore.

One way to solve this dilemma is through transparency and honesty. Unfortunately, as long as governments use closed-source software, it is hard to audit and trust the actions. Today, Canonical announces that not only has Munich taken an open approach to computing with Ubuntu, but the city is saving millions of euros too. Using open-source software and saving money? Hell, maybe all governments should make the switch to Linux.

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The Linux Kernel Might Use FreeBSD's Capsicum Security Framework

Filed under
Linux
BSD

A Linux kernel developer is working on porting FreeBSD's CAPSICUM security framework over to the Linux kernel.

In announcing his work at the end of June that's now being discussed amongst kernel stakeholders, David Drysdale wrote, "The last couple of versions of FreeBSD (9.x/10.x) have included the Capsicum security framework, which allows security-aware applications to sandbox themselves in a very fine-grained way. For example, OpenSSH now uses Capsicum in its FreeBSD version to restrict sshd's credentials checking process, to reduce the chances of credential leakage. It would be good to have equivalent functionality in Linux, so I've been working on getting the Capsicum framework running in the kernel, and I'd appreciate some feedback/opinions on the general design approach."

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4MLinux 9.0 Allinone Edition Has Been Declared Stable

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Zbigniew Konojacki announced the stable release of the 4MLinux 9.0 Allinone Edition operating system, which includes the 4MLinux 9.0 Media Edition, 4MLinux 9.0 Game Edition, 4MLinux 9.0 Rescue Edition, and 4MLinux 9.0 Server Edition distributions.

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Linux Kernel 3.10.47 LTS Includes ReiserFS and NFS Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the immediate availability for download of the Linux 3.10.47 LTS (Long Term Support) kernel, along with the Linux kernels 3.4.97 LTS, 3.14.11 LTS and 3.15.4.

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Linux Kernel 3.4.97 Arrives with Updated Drivers and PowerPC Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman announced yesterday, July 6, that a new maintenance release for the Long Term Support 3.4.97 Linux kernel branch of the Linux kernel is available for download, urging users to upgrade to it as soon as possible.

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BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS