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Linux

Linux Mint 17.1 to Feature a Much Better Update Manager

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Linux

Linux Mint developers are working on the first major update for the operating system, 17.1, and one of the big changes will be made to the Update Manager, which will provide much more information for the users.

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China Developing Its Own OS To Take On Apple, Microsoft, and Google

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OS
Linux

If it hasn't been made clear enough in recent months that China would love nothing more than to cut down on its reliance to American technology companies, its just-announced decision to create its own operating system should remedy that. At first, this OS will target the desktop, but eventually, it'll make its way to smartphones and other mobile devices.
At this point, we know very little about what China's OS will look like, or be like for that matter, but we do know that it's being designed to be a proper replacement for Microsoft's and Google's OSes. It seems very likely that China's OS would use Linux as a base, since there's little point in reinventing the wheel, and because of its open-source nature, the country would have complete control over the code. Further, Linux natively supports both x86 and ARM architectures, so that'd help take care of both the desktop and mobile aspect of the OS, and of course, Linux already supports a lot of software

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Specialization and the Linux Desktop

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Linux

Our benevolent dictator for life recently claimed that he was still aiming at Linux being as prevalent on the desktop as it is in the datacenter or in the cloud. The statement was meant with roaring applause from the crowd, and a few healthy, and a few not so healthy, doses of skepticism from the press. Recently, IT World asked “Does it still make sense for Linus to want the desktop for Linux?”, and Matt Asay from Tech Repubic asked “Can we please stop talking about the Linux desktop?”. Both publishers are critical of the claim that there is still room for Linux on Personal Computers, and point to Android as a Linux success story. What both articles miss though is that the flexibility of Linux, and the permissiveness of it’s open source license may be the thing that saves Linux on the desktop, just not in the way we were expecting.

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Linus Torvalds is my hero, says 13 year old Zachary DuPont

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Linux

Zachary DuPon is a 6th grader who will turn 13 years old soon. He used to be an Arch Linux user and is looking forward to installing Gentoo Linux soon.

The story of Zach goes like this – his school organized a project where students were asked to write a letter to their heroes, while most kids wrote to celebrities, Zach wrote to the ‘real’ hero of the modern technology world – Linus Torvalds.

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Why I don't distro-hop: Because work. And pain.

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Linux

In any Linux distribution I use, I'd love to have full functionality with the open Radeon graphics driver. I'd also love a packaged Catalyst driver that works with GNOME 3. I can't get the former with anything just yet, and I can't get the latter in Fedora due to Wayland code in GNOME 3 that doesn't yet play with Catalyst. Since I tend to run Xfce instead of GNOME, this isn't a deal-breaker.

The good thing about all of these problems is that they tend to get solved in Fedora faster than almost anywhere else -- Arch Linux excepted, of course.

And as I've said before, I love the Fedora community.

And did I mention that I hate distro-hopping?

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Video: Which Super Hero Would the Linux Community Be?

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Linux

A Reddit thread posted earlier this week posed the question, “What if Linux distros were super heroes?” Would Ubuntu be Superman? We'll leave it to the Redditors to debate that one. But we can weigh in on the question “Which super hero would Linux community be?”

The developers, system administrators, architects, business managers, and community leaders who attended LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America this week are all Linux super heroes. But this year some attendees also decided to dress the part – mingling in the hallway track and attending sessions as their favorite hero as part of the event's first ever Comic Book Hero Day and costume contest.

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Cheapo Firefox OS mobes to debut in India – definitely not one for selfie-conscious users

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Linux
Moz/FF

The Mozilla Foundation's aim to create a Firefox OS for mobile devices was not to take a quixotic tilt at the top end of the smartphone market. Instead, it hoped to provide an alternative that would enable the delivery of low-cost, but still smart, devices to places where smartphones are still a significant purchase.

That plan looks to be working in India, where local outfit Spicephone has just announced it will offer the nation's first Firefox-OS-powered phone for Rs 2,299 (US$38, £23).

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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

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GNU
Linux

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information.

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Linux is Evolving

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Linux

Again, using the flexible building blocks that Linux is built out of in interesting and creative ways to build something new and amazing. It is incredible to look at the previous generation of server operating systems, which often threw in everything plus Firefox, KDE, and the kitchen sink, and compare that to where we are going now. Small, modular, special purpose server distributions that are miles away from the desktop or what we had before, but still sharing the same open source Linux core.
The evolution of Linux continues to be endlessly fascinating, I can’t wait to see what comes next.

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Patch By Patch, LLVM Clang Gets Better At Building The Linux Kernel

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Development
Linux
BSD

With each kernel revision, LLVM Clang gets closer to being able to build the mainline Linux kernel. There's now just a few dozen patches outstanding for LLVMLinux to be a mainline success.

Behan Webster gave his usual talk at LinuxCon in Chicago this week about the state of LLVMLinux -- building the Linux kernel with Clang rather than GCC. There's been many Phoronix articles about the topic so there isn't too much more to share beyond that many developers want to use Clang to compile the Linux kernel to lead to better code portability of the kernel, faster compilation times of Clang, potential performance differences, LLVM and Clang are more liberally licensed, and there's a host of other development extras with Clang.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.