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It's COOL-ER with Linux

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Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Have you bought a Kindle or Kindle 2 yet? Don't--at least not until you check out the COOL-ER ebook reader.

5 Biggest Tech Letdowns

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Linux

connectedinternet.co.uk: It’s fun to look back in retrospect and remember the genesis of technologies that truly have become inseparable from our everyday lives. It’s even more fun to look back on the belly flops.

Macpup - Puppy on steroids

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Linux

dedoimedo.com: Going through the almost endless repository of Puplets, I came across a little doggie called Macpup Foxy. It intrigued me, so I downloaded it and tried it - and very much liked it. So today, we're going to have a short review; nothing major. Call this a Puppy sequel, if you will.

Testing Out ATI Kernel Mode-Setting On Ubuntu

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Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Kernel mode-setting for Intel graphics hardware can already be found in the mainline Linux kernel and will be included by default in the release of Ubuntu 9.10 later this year.

Fedora 11 and Ext4: The Straight Bits

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Linux
Interviews

jaboutboul.blogspot: Fedora 11, when released tomorrow, will be the first distribution to boast the inclusion of ext4, the latest incarnation in the extended file system family, as default. Join me for an interview with Eric Sandeen, renown file system hacker.

Palm's Linux smartphone debuts

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Linux

linuxdevices.com: As promised, Palm's Linux-based smartphone went on sale Saturday, available exclusively for Sprint networks, says eWEEK. Early reviews have been favorable, although analysts worry about the lack of software and the ability of Sprint to effectively market the Palm Pre.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 306

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Absolute Linux 12.2.5

  • News: Fedora prepares to launch "Leonidas", openSUSE opens up development, Mandriva gathers ideas for 2010, CentOS publishes community magazine, Sun offers hints about Solaris 11, SliTaz 3.0 roadmap
  • Released last week: OpenSolaris 2009.06, Tiny Core Linux 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 11, Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 2
  • New additions: Hymera Open, Qimo 4 Kids
  • New distributions: Digital Forensic Live CD, InfraLinux, StormOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Thank Apple for the Linux 'desktop'

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Linux
Mac

Matt Asay: I spent the weekend using Ubuntu 9.04 almost exclusively. Blame it on Apple. In 2002 I switched to the Mac and have never looked back. Which, I think, is why it has been so easy to pick up Ubuntu, Moblin, and other variants of Linux.

Wolvix Linux 2.0 Beta 2 Review

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Linux

extremetech.com: This week I decided to take a look at a lesser known distribution called Wolvix Linux. Wolvix is based on Slackware and, according to the Wolvix site, is geared toward the home user. But how well does it really work for home users?

China's Censorware: What about GNU/Linux?

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Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: News is breaking that the Chinese government will insist on censorware being shipped with all PCs:

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More in Tux Machines

Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

The boycotting of systemd has led to the creation of uselessd, a new init daemon based off systemd that tries to strip out the "unnecessary" features. Uselessd in its early stages of development is systemd reduced to being a basic init daemon process with "the superfluous stuff cut out". Among the items removed are removing of journald, libudev, udevd, and superfluous unit types. Read more

Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

Software-defined networking (SDN) is emerging as one of the fastest growing segments of open source software (OSS), which in itself is now firmly entrenched in the enterprise IT world. SDN simplifies IT network configuration and management by decoupling control from the physical network infrastructure. Read more

Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written. Read more