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The comeback of Elive

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Linux

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: "The world has not ended, so... now be Elive!" This is a catchy phrase in the release announcement for those of us who, after seeing one of the most beautiful Linux distros go dormant, are now excited at the release of a new alpha of Elive.

Fedora 18 finally to be released with game-changing features

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Linux

techrepublic.com: Fedora 18 is finally here (as of Jan. 15). Jack Wallen takes a look at some of the included features and draws the conclusion that the wait for Spherical Cow might might well make up for delay.

Fedora 17 Xfce Spin Review - eXtremely eXcellent

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Linux

unsolicitedbutoffered.blogspot: After the pleasant experience of running the Fedora 17 LXDE spin, I decided to give the Xfce Fedora 17 Beefy Miracle spin a try considering that the next iteration of Fedora was yet again delayed (which is not a big deal since 17 is an excellent release).

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 490

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Linux

Welcome to this year's second issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Many of us take this time of year as an opportunity to gaze back at things we have recently experienced and to look ahead at things to come. This week we are going to do both.

Bodhi Linux 2.2.0 Review

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Linux
  • Bodhi Linux 2.2.0 Review: Better than ever
  • Snowlinux 4 "Glacier" Mate Review: Fast, light
  • SparkyLinux 2.1 rc Ultra Edition

CompuLab Intense PC Pro Review – The Mini PC of your dreams

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Linux
Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: The specs say it’s packed with power, but has CompuLab truly delivered an intense product in such a small package?

Preview: Elementary OS 2 "Luna" Beta 1

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Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: Almost 2 years ago, a bit after its official release, I reviewed Elementary OS 0.1 "Jupiter". There I said that there was a ton of hype surrounding its release, and that I had bought into the hype a little bit.

I Raised My Kids On the Command Line…and They Love It

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Linux

lifehacker.com: Two years ago, my son Jacob (then 3) and I built his first computer together. I installed Debian on it, but never put a GUI on the thing. It's command-line, and has provided lots of enjoyment off and on over the last couple of years.

Linux Mint 14 Is a Breath of Fresh Air

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Linux
Reviews

linuxinsider.com: Linux Mint 14, released in December and dubbed the "Nadia" version, is loaded with a horde of improvements to all four of its desktop environments. It is not usually necessary to grab every new release to a distro, but Nadia is a significant upgrade to an evolving Linux OS. This one is a keeper.

Ultimate Edition 3.5

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Linux
Reviews

Ultimate Edition 3.5: Does size matter when it comes to Linux distros? Well, it very well might when it comes to Ultimate Edition 3.5. There’s nothing subtle about this distro. Everything about it screams over the top, from the color scheme to the range of software included with it.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more