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Linux

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

Filed under
Development
Linux

Hardware errors are tough to code for. In some cases, they're impossible to code for. A particular brand of hardware error is the Machine-Check Exception (MCE), which means a CPU has a problem. On Windows systems, it's one of the causes of the Blue Screen of Death.

Everyone wants to handle hardware errors well, because it can mean the difference between getting a little indication of what actually went wrong and getting no information at all.

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Linux 3.18-rc4

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Linux

Hey, things are finally calming down. In fact, it looked *really* calm
until yesterday, at which point some people clearly realized "hey, I
should push my stuff to Linus so that it makes it into -rc4", and then
a third of all changes came in the last day, but despite that, rc4
finally looks like things are falling into place, and we'll get to
stabilize this release after all.

Here's to hoping the trend holds...

Things look fairly normal. A bit over half is drivers, and almost a
third is architecture patches (arm, powerpc, mips and s390). The rest
is a few filesystem updates (mainly XFS) and misc random stuff.

The shortlog gives a feel for the details, and nothing looks
particularly scary or odd.

Linus

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Tiny Raspberry Pi A+ SBC goes for $20

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Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation launched a Model A+ with a $20 price, and a tiny 65 x 56mm footprint, 23g weight, and compact 40-pin expansion header.

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Also: Raspberry Pi supercapacitor micro-UPS seeks funding

A 'proprietary' Linux would have cost $1 trillion & 8,000 person-years

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Linux

As CTO at open source Business Intelligence (BI) products company Pentaho, James Dixon is responsible for the firm's architecture and technology roadmap.

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Bullet Pi Interview

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

So I’d seen The Matrix and also a BBC programme called Supernatural: The Unseen Powers Of Animals, where they shot dolphins jumping out of the water and they could just freeze time, and then spin round so you saw the water drops, and I thought that was a really amazing effect. And reading how it was done, it was with a whole array of cameras and it seemed quite simple. So I had the Raspberry Pi and a couple of cameras sat on my desk, and it was sort of like, ‘Well, if it seems that simple, then surely if we just got a whole load of Raspberry Pis and cameras – and they’re not that expensive – why shouldn’t we just be able to build it?’ It was one of those moments where you think it should work but you don’t actually know. So what I did was buy four cameras and I tried it, and that looked like it would work – it gave us a tantalising glimpse that we could do it.

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eNcade Is a Portable Raspberry Pi Gaming Console That Doubles Up as a Desktop PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux

eNcade is a portable Raspberry Pi-powered gaming tablet that is currently in the works. Its makers are looking for funding on Kickstarter and they are hoping to get enough money so that they can properly start this project.

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New Kernel Live Patching Combines kGraft & Kpatch

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Back in February SUSE unveiled a new means of live Linux kernel patching, kGraft, compared to the existing Ksplice. One month later, Red Hat unveiled their own solution that happened to be under development at the same time, Kpatch. Since both of them have been out, both have pursued mainline interests but neither one accepted upstream yet. Now a new live kernel patching solution is out that tries to take the best of both worlds.

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Details Emerge on UT One Ubuntu Linux Tablet

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Details continue to emerge on the UT One, the tablet with an Intel processor that will run on Canonical's Ubuntu operating system. Here are the latest revelations on what will very possibly be one of the first x86-based mobile devices powered by an open source Linux distribution (yeah, Android is not really a Linux distribution).

Rumors regarding the UT One, whose developers say they will have the hardware ready to ship by the end of this calendar year, first appeared about a week ago. Since then Canonical's role has become clearer, even if the details of the relationship between the company and the UT One developers remain to be determined.

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Rugged Linux box-PC excels at industrial fieldbuses

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Linux

Ixxat’s ruggedized “Econ 100″ DIN rail computer runs Linux on an ARM/FPGA Xilinx Zynq SoC, and supports multiple industrial Ethernet and fieldbus protocols.

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Also: Rugged industrial gateway runs Linux on TI Sitara

Lenovo to launch low-cost Chromebook in early 2015

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Lenovo reportedly will launch Chromebook models targeting the sub-US$170 segment in early 2015, a move which will further drag down profits for notebook vendors, according to Taiwan-based supply chain makers.

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Security Leftovers

today's howtos

Software: Audacity, Geary, GNOME Photos, Business Apps, Mir, Nix, KubeVirt, Top Projects and Apoxi

  • Audacity 2.2.2 Released with a Stack of New Features & Improvements
    This update also builds upon the major changes introduced in the release of Audacity 2.2.0 last year, as well that of the minor 2.2.1 update earlier this year.
  • Geary Email Client Mails Out a Bug Fix Update
    A new version of the Geary email client for Linux desktops is available to download. Although a (relative) minor update when compared to the huge Geary 0.12 release last year, Geary 0.12.1 is worthwhile. The update solves a stack of crashes and server compatibility issues, while also updating translations in the interface and user manual to ensure as many people can use Geary as possible.
  • GNOME Photos – An Elegant Alternative for Organizing and Sharing Photos
    How many GNU/Linux photo managers do you know have a beautiful UI for browsing photos and organizing them into collections coupled with inbuilt editing tools and cloud integration? This one goes by the name of GNOME Photos. GNOME Photos is a simple and yet elegant photo management app with which you can organize, share, and intuitively edit your photos on your Linux workstation. It features a file manager-like environment for easy navigation and cloud integration via GNOME Online Accounts.
  • Linux Means Business – Best Free Business Apps
    Let’s deal with the issue of cost up front. Every single application featured in this article is available to download without payment. This, in itself, helps to keep IT costs within a tight budget. And cost can be a very important driver when seeking an IT solution for firms – particularly for freelancers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, small businesses, and educational establishments. Naturally, these types of people and organizations will have some sort of IT budget. From a business perspective, open source business applications won’t necessarily be zero cost. Using unfamiliar software entails training costs for a firm — the costs are not limited to time itself. And then there’s the expense of obtaining support for the software, or even hiring development time to customize certain aspects of the software to add additional functionality. Off-the-shelf software is unlikely to completely address a company’s needs. But if a proprietary solution is sought, it’s likely that this development will be more expensive. It is sometimes thought that Linux software cannot rival Microsoft applications in a commercial setting because the strength of Linux comes from its price. In fact, Linux’s strength derives from other considerations such as flexibility, stability, security, cutting-edge technology, and ease of use. Additionally, the virtues of open source software are invaluable to commercial organizations whatever their size. With full access to source code, companies can easily develop extensions to the software, tailor made to their own specific needs and requirements. Moreover they are not reliant on the goodwill of a single vendor in order to do business: Linux is about freedom and choice and that is just as important to an organisation as to an individual.
  • Mir's Wayland Support Will Now Let You Drag Around Windows
    I was surprised to learn that up until this week, Mir's initial Wayland support didn't allow for windows of Wayland clients to be moved around the screen. Fortunately, that has now been resolved with allowing window movement to be initiated by Wayland clients running on Mir. Now you can enjoy Qt, GTK apps, and even the Weston Terminal to be moved around the screen. Previously there was just server-side support for moving windows in Wayland while now is client-side support.
  • Nix 2.0 Package Manager Released With A Ton Of Changes
    Nix 2.0 is now available as the latest major update to this functional package manager most commonly associated with the NixOS Linux distribution.
  • KubeVirt v0.3.0-alpha.3: Kubernetes native networking and storage
    First post for quite some time. A side effect of being busy to get streamline our KubeVirt user experience. KubeVirt v0.3.0 was not released at the beginnig of the month. That release was intended to be a little bigger, because it included a large architecture change (to the good). The change itself was amazingly friendly and went in without much problems - even if it took some time. But, the work which was building upon this patch in the storage and network areas was delayed and didn’t make it in time. Thus we skipped the release in order to let storage and network catch up.
  • Top 5 open source projects for 2018
    In our increasingly collaborative world, open source technology is a top trend that is having a major impact on the development and implementation of cutting edge capabilities. Open source is when source code connected to a program is made freely available, giving users the opportunity to make modifications and to share with other users. The common alternative to this is proprietary software, source code that remains under the strict control of an organisation, team or individual, ensuring that the integral code remains private and controlled by its owner.
  • DataTorrent Glues Open Source Componentry with ‘Apoxi’
    Building an enterprise-grade big data application with open source components is not easy. Anybody who has worked with Apache Hadoop ecosystem technology can tell you that. But the folks at DataTorrent say they’ve found a way to accelerate the delivery of secure and scalable big data applications with Apoxi, a new framework they created to stitch together major open source components like Hadoop, Spark, and Kafka, in an extensible and pluggable fashion.