Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

The Second Enterprise Open Source Revolution

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

One of the key moments in the rise of GNU/Linux was when software companies producing their own variant of Unix realised that it made no sense for them all to work on something that was no longer providing any competitive advantage - it was simply part of the digital plumbing that had to be provided in some form. That meant they could usefully collaborate on a common platform, and differentiate themselves in other ways - higher up the software stack, or through services, for example.

Then the question became: whose Unix should they all standardise on? To choose any one of the available commercial Unixes would naturally give the company offering it a big advantage; what was needed was a neutral middle-ground. That middle-ground was GNU/Linux. Not only did it have all the advantages of traditional Unix, but its openness meant that it could be easily customised without requiring complicated licensing agreements.

Commoditisation has now spread to many other areas, notably in the smartphone and embedded sectors, as companies realise that it makes sense to collaborate on the common elements, which saves money and time, and frees up resources to work on more specialised aspects which might produce bigger paybacks.

Read more

Salix Live 14.1 Is a Light Slackware-Based OS with a Windows Vibe

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack

The Live version of Salix has been in the works for quite some time and the developers have made a lot of changes and improvements since the previous release in the series. In fact, the Live editions for the Salix flavors have been largely ignored in the past couple of years, but that is changing with this release.

Salix is one of the few Linux distributions still maintained that is using Slackware as the base. Many of the older, similar distros have gone away completely and others have changed their base. The Linux ecosystem is all about diversity, so it's a good thing that some developers are still trying to keep the Slackware dream alive.

Read more

Hands-on with the Kano: The Linux kit that wants to help kids love coding

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Kano, a small British start up with strong Israeli ties, set out to make the inside workings of a modern computer accessible to children again. The idea behind the project is get kids coding and hacking themselves, and was inspired by one of the founders' seven-year-old cousin who wanted to build a computer and wondered if it could be made as easy as playing with Lego.

Read more

Pisi Linux 1.1 KDE

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Pisi Linux has continued its activities after 1.0 and we reached our second stable version 1.1. This version resulting from intensive studies; strong, stable, comfortable to use, safe and so fast. The strength of the structure to prevent damage to your system uses hardware safely to the end. Also in this release, along with many innovations were offered to us.

Read more

Linux Distributors Are All Over the Cloud

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Two of the major Linux distributors, Red Hat Inc. and SUSE, appear to believe that becoming the dominant supplier of cloud services and technology will allow them to continue to battle mainframes, Windows and single-vendor Unix in both corporate and services provider datacenters. Both of these suppliers have made recent announcements based on cloud-related products and services. Let's take a look at what they're doing.

Read more

Mobile Linux Distros Keep on Morphing

Filed under
Linux

Legitimate questions have been raised as to whether Linux platforms designed for smartphones are as good as a tailored embedded Linux stack built from scratch. Yet, so far experiments outside the mobile realm have proven fairly successful. Over the last week, we saw how several of these platforms, including Firefox OS, Tizen, Ubuntu, and WebOS, are spreading out to new device types.

First, Mozilla revealed a Firefox OS port to the Raspberry Pi that it hopes will rival Raspbian. Also last week, Samsung showed off a Tizen-based smart TV prototype, as well as a new camera. In addition, specs for the first Ubuntu Touch-enabled tablet were floated on the web, and earlier last month, LG hinted at an upcoming WebOS smartwatch.

Read more

Tiny $269 3D resin printer runs Linux on Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

The $269 iBox Nano, billed as the “world’s smallest, cheapest 3D resin printer,” offers WiFi and 328 Micron resolution, and runs Linux on a Raspberry Pi.

The Raspberry Pi has been used as a computer interface device for 3D printers, as well as a calibration add-on, but as far as we know the iBox Nano is the first 3D printer in which Linux is running the show internally. Last month, an engineering student named Owen Jeffreys showed a video of a Raspberry Pi-based 3D printer project, but the project has yet to be completed (see farther below). Meanwhile, the only other commercial 3D printers we know of that run Linux are the three MakerBot Replicator models announced earlier this year.

Read more

Samsung announce Gear S for South Korea to be available on SK Telecom and KT

Filed under
Linux

The Tizen Samsung Gear S is slowly extending its global rollout, with many of our readers being excited about seeing the Smartwatch / phone arriving on in the US on November 7 on AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless.

Now we have had the announcement of the Tizen based Samsung Gear S coming to Samsung’s home country of South Korea, and will be available in Black and White colours for 297,000 WON, through SK Telecom and also KT. The Gear S is the first Tizen based Smartwatch to have an Integrated 3G modem that can be used to make calls directly from the Smartwatch, and also to provide 3G data connectivity.

Read more

MCDE 1.1 is Live

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Makulu Cinnamon Edition should now run smoothly without any further issues …

Read more

CoreOS: A lean, mean virtualization machine

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

CoreOS is a slimmed-down Linux distribution designed for easy creation of lots of OS instances. We like the concept.

CoreOS uses Docker to deploy applications in virtual containers; it also features a management communications bus, and group instance management.

Rackspace, Amazon Web Services (AWS), GoogleComputeEngine (GCE), and Brightbox are early cloud compute providers compatible with CoreOS and with specific deployment capacity for CoreOS. We tried Rackspace and AWS, and also some local “fleet” deployments.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more