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MIPS aims new 64-bit Warrior cores at mobile devices

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Android
Linux

Imagination announced a 64-bit Warrior processor with a MIPS I6400 core that features hardware virtualization, multi-threading, and multi-clustering.

Imagination unveiled its I-Class Warrior processor featuring a new family of 64-bit MIPS I6400 cores, thereby filling in the high end of its Warrior family. The new I6400 cores are primarily designed for SoCs used in servers and networking gear, and much like earlier MIPS64 cores have been used in Linux-oriented system-on-chips like Cavium’s carrier-grade Octeon III or Broadcom’s XLR. However, for the first time, 64-bit MIPS cores are also being promoted as a mobile solution.

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Red Hat Developers Introduce New Tool For Linux Storage Management

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Linux
Red Hat

The lid has been lifted on blivet-gui, a new open-source storage tool designed by Red Hat for configuring disks and file-systems.

Red Hat decided to develop a new GUI-driven utility for storage management on Fedora/RHEL as GParted, one of the popular programs for disk management on Linux, doesn't support all of the technologies found in modern Linux distributions. The utility is named blivet-gui as it uses the Blivet Python library used for storage configuration. Red Hat's Anaconda installer is already using Blivet for its storage configuration during installation so this new tool should integrate well with their stack.

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Instant DIY controller project plans Linux add-on

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Linux

The “PIEP” Kickstarter project offers a snap-together, modular, DIY control system with a wide range of processor and I/O boards, and a future Linux option.

E3 Embedded Systems built its “Processor Independent Embedded Platform” (aka PIEP) kit to showcase its various microcontroller unit (MCU) and peripheral boards. The modular development kit not only offers a choice of MCU boards, but let’s you choose among 21 peripheral boards, with more on the way. The stackable design enables up to 36 peripherals modules to fit on one motherboard.

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Dell targets businesses with new Chromeboxes

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Linux
Google

Chrome OS is gaining momentum not only in the consumer space, these devices are also becoming popular among businesses. Dell will start selling two Chromeboxes for businesses and individuals later this month.

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Your Facebook page as a Firefox OS mobile app

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

Whether you are a business or community page owner, what would be better than increasing your page reachability by offering your standalone mobile app?

Apptuter is an open source framework to help you achieve that, with minimum coding knowledge and easy to follow steps you would be able to produce your own app. The framework currently supports Facebook pages as a content source and is capable of producing apps for Firefox OS, Android, and IOS platforms.

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Humble Weekly Bundle Brings Five Linux Games

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

It's been a while since the last Humble Bundle collection that also had a hefty portion of Linux title, but now The Humble Weekly Bundle: Presented by Rock, Paper, Shotgun has arrived and it's pretty interesting.

Humble Bundle collections usually feature lots of Linux games, but this summer we saw a lot of Windows-only releases. It's a not a major problem, but now we have a new collection that is a lot more Linux friendly and that should make a lot of users happy.

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Los Angeles schools need to think outside the iPad

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Foisting computers on schools has been a lucrative business, one easily disguised as charity. Among Pearson’s allies is the Gates Foundation, which works alongside Microsoft’s education arm to promote the Common Core in schools and support libraries, with Microsoft software in hand. Gates’ competitor for the richest-person-in-the-world slot, Mexican telecom monopolist Carlos Slim, has proposed to bypass schools altogether by bankrolling the online-only Khan Academy. Now Rupert Murdoch is trying to enter the education tech business with a tablet of his own.

[...]

One might, for instance, consider replacing the iPad with a little device called a Raspberry Pi. About the size of a credit card, it’s a fully featured computer, though a keyboard and screen need to be plugged in separately. It comes as a single circuit board with no casing, which reflects its philosophy; the basic parts of the machine are plain for a student to see — the video card, the CPU, the power system, the USB ports. The nonprofit Raspberry Pi Foundation sells it for as little as $25, compared with $299 to $929 for an iPad. One Laptop per Child (OLPC), another nonprofit project, produces low-cost laptops and tablets with education in mind.

Software can be even cheaper. The Raspberry Pi and OLPC run on Linux, a free, open-source operating system, which is constantly being improved and expanded by thousands of programmers around the world. An enormous variety of free, community-developed programs, including fully featured office suites, graphics tools and games — as well as popular commercial programs such as Skype and Dropbox — can be installed on the device. Apple and Microsoft often tell us that open-source software is unreliable and unfriendly to use, but that hasn’t stopped Linux from being the basis of Android phones, many everyday appliances and most of the Internet. The computer I used to write this article runs Linux.

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The Wrong Way To Install GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux

Now, the newbie does not need to create a shopping list with thousands of entries. Many of the Debian packages are libraries shared by multiple applications so start with the major applications the newbie needs: a web browser or two, an office suite or two, some graphics applications for producing drawings or editing images, some multimedia software, various utilities like file-manager, search engine (yes you can have powerful tools on your desktop), database, etc. Make a short list of a few dozen or less packages that give the newbie what he/she wants. Then consider the desktop itself. The newbie can have none at all (strange but true), simple iconified desktops, brave new world shortcut-driven searchable-everything desktops and even some combinations like several different desktops running in virtual machines… Here the possibilities are numerous but there should be some combination that suites the user. If the user like most runs a few applications routinely and has a small total number of applications ever used, a rather finite desktop like XFCE should work. It’s a lot like XP with a task bar (or not), actual menus and such. If the user is some kind of genius with a huge number of applications, too many to hide behind icons, a search-engine base might be the way to go. You just start typing the name/description of an application and you find it just like URI’s autocompletion in your browser. Then choose KDE or GNOME.

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A Linux Accessibility Advocate's Top 3 LinuxCon Takeaways

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Linux

Chicago has many outstanding qualities, and provided an excellent backdrop to this year’s LinuxCon. Three things stuck out this year that were significant to my own experience...

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Acer Chromebook 13 review

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The best Chromebooks all have one thing in common: they’re small. The most popular Chromebooks have small, low-resolution 11.6-inch displays. They may offer a low price, stellar battery life, and fast performance — but sometimes you just want a bigger computer.

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I'm Brian Fox, Author of the Bash Shell, and This Is How I Work

Brian Fox is a titan of open source software. As the first employee of Richard Stallman’s Free Software Foundation, he wrote several core GNU components, including the GNU Bash shell. Now he’s a board member of the National Association of Voting Officials and co-founder of Orchid Labs, which delivers uncensored and private internet access to users like those behind China’s firewall. We talked to him about his career and how he works. Read more

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