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Intel Linux Driver Trying Bay Trail Aggressive Downclocking

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Linux

Intel's Linux open-source crew is toying with aggressive down-clocking for current-generation Bay Trail hardware for greater power-savings and lower heat output.

Chris Wilson of Intel OTC has proposed a patch to be more aggressive about down-clocking -- dropping the Atom/Celeron SoCs to their lower frequency/power states more quickly after being in a ramped-up state. Assuming the workload has finished, this should yield a quicker return to the lowest power state for maximum power-savings / longest battery life and lower heat output.

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BFS Scheduler Updated For The Linux 3.15 Kernel

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Linux

Con Kolivas has updated his out-of-tree process scheduler for the Linux kernel.

The Brain Fuck Scheduler has been revised to version 448 and released on Wednesday for the Linux 3.15 stable kernel.

Besides updating against the kernel interfaces of Linux 3.15, there's no reports of other changes for the BFS scheduler with the v448 revision. Kolivas continues to have no desire to mainline the Brain Fuck Scheduler.

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NSA: Linux Journal is an "extremist forum" and its readers get flagged for extra surveillance

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Linux
Security

A new story published on the German site Tagesschau and followed up by BoingBoing and DasErste.de has uncovered some shocking details about who the NSA targets for surveillance including visitors to Linux Journal itself.

While it has been revealed before that the NSA captures just about all Internet traffic for a short time, the Tagesschau story provides new details about how the NSA's XKEYSCORE program decides which traffic to keep indefinitely. XKEYSCORE uses specific selectors to flag traffic, and the article reveals that Web searches for Tor and Tails--software I've covered here in Linux Journal that helps to protect a user's anonymity and privacy on the Internet--are among the selectors that will flag you as "extremist" and targeted for further surveillance. If you just consider how many Linux Journal readers have read our Tor and Tails coverage in the magazine, that alone would flag quite a few innocent people as extremist.

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LinuxCon and ELC Europe keynotes revealed

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Linux

The Linux Foundation announced keynote speakers for LinuxCon + CloudOpen + Embedded Linux Conference Europe, to be held Oct. 13-15 in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Like last year, the Linux Foundation’s LinuxCon Europe is being co-located with CloudOpen Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, with a single registration. This year the shows are joined even closer with plus signs, showing it’s just one big happy Linux fest — with plenty of good German beer.

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Docker and Linux containers: Red Hat opens up on the issues

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Linux
Red Hat

Red Hat's platform business vice president Jim Totton believes the current focus on containers could signal the growth of an alternative type of computing architecture — but says it's not yet clear how people will apply the technology.

Elements of container technology have existed in Linux in the form of cgroups since 2006 and in UNIX for decades. Containers sit on top of a single Linux instance and are a lighter-weight form of virtualisation, each capable of running an isolated app on a reduced OS under the control of a resources policy.

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10 tips for a more user-friendly Linux desktop

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GNU
Linux

The Linux desktop is leaps and bounds from where it was 10, five, even two years ago. Desktop environments that many declared unusable or dead have seen a renaissance in usability. But that doesn't mean that out of the box, every Linux desktop is ready for every type of user. For each user type there may be many ways to make a desktop more usable. Thankfully, this is Linux -- so options are never a problem.

With that in mind, I wanted to highlight my 10 best tips for creating more user-friendly Linux desktops. Not every one of these tips will apply to your particular desktop (be it GNOME, Unity, KDE, XFCE, Deepin Desktop, Cinnamon... the list goes on). But you should find more than one tip that will go a long way toward improving your experience.

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Wayland: tomorrow’s graphics tech today (by way of the Raspberry Pi)

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Linux

It already powers the hardware behind some set-top boxes and in-car infotainment solutions, but few realise that some development work on Wayland, the proposed display server replacement for X, is thanks in part to the Raspberry Pi…

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Linux 3.16 Aims To Enable Radeon BAPM By Default

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Linux

A DRM-fixes pull request for the open-source Radeon Linux graphics driver for the Linux 3.16 kernel is going to enable BAPM by default for some APU systems.

BAPM is a power management feature that handles power budgeting between the CPU/GPUs on APUs. Up to now BAPM has been disabled by default, but for fixing some power-related bugs, this feature is looking to be turned on post-3.16 merge window for some AMD APU hardware.

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Chumby back from the dead with 1,000 apps

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Linux
Gadgets

Chumby, which sold Linux-based tabletop devices that ran Flash-based apps, is back in business under Blue Octy, with an overhauled website and 1,000 apps.

Chumby Industries went out of business a year ago, leaving Chumby owners and subscribers in the lurch. Blue Octy LLC, quickly snatched up the assets and revamped the website. As reported first by Engadget, the company has now reopened the Chumby service.

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kGraft Being Discussed For Inclusion Into Linux-Next

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Linux
SUSE

The SUSE method for live kernel patching, kGraft, is being proposed for possible inclusion into the linux-next branch in hopes it will be merged into an upcoming Linux kernel release cycle.

The kGraft patches for live kernel patching continue to be revised and reviewed but at the same time there's still Kpatch that's been developed by Red Hat with some different design principles for updating the running kernel in real-time. To date there's been no general consensus on the superior solution nor any agreement to try to merge Kpatch and kGraft.

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Graphics: NVIDIA, Nouveau, X.Org Server

  • NVIDIA Making Progress On Server-Side GLVND: Different Drivers For Different X Screens
    While NVIDIA isn't doing much to help out Nouveau, at least the company is contributing to the open-source Linux graphics ecosystem in other ways. In addition to presenting at XDC2017 this week on the Unix device memory allocator API and DeepColor / HDR support, they also presented on server-side GLVND. Server-side GLVND is separate from the client-side GLVND (OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library) that evolved over the past few years and with modern Linux systems is supported both by Mesa and the NVIDIA binary driver. Server-side GLVND can help PRIME laptops and other use-cases like XWayland where potentially dealing with multiple GPU drivers touching X.
  • Nouveau Developers Remain Blocked By NVIDIA From Advancing Open-Source Driver
    Longtime Nouveau contributors Martin Peres and Karol Herbst presented at this week's XDC2017 X.Org conference at the Googleplex in Mountain View. It was a quick talk as they didn't have a whole lot to report on due to their open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver efforts largely being restricted by NVIDIA Corp.
  • X.Org Server 1.20 Expected Around January With New Features
    X.Org Server 1.19 is already almsot one year old and while X.Org is currently well off its six month release cadence, version 1.20 is being figured out for an early 2018 release. Adam Jackson of Red Hat who has been serving as the xorg-server release manager held a quick session on Friday at XDC2017 to figure out what's needed for X.Org Server 1.20. His goal is to see X.Org Server 1.20 released in time for making the Fedora 28 version. For that to happen nicely, he's hoping to see xorg-server 1.20 released in January. The Fedora 28 beta freeze is the middle of March so there is still time for the 1.20 release to slip while making the F28 Linux distribution update.

ASUS Launches Its Thinnest and Lightest Flippable Chromebook, the Flip C101

ASUS announced a new Chromebook on its website, the Flip C101, which is a smaller and lightweight version of the C302 model. Featuring a 10.1-inch touchscreen display, the all-new Chromebook is priced at only $299 in the US. Read more

FreeBSD 10.4-RC2 Now Available

The second RC build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Read more