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Linux

7 Top Linux Trends of 2012

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Linux

linux.com: There's no denying that 2012 has been a momentous year for Linux. Of course, like any other year, the one now drawing to a close has been more than simply a collection of individual successes for Linux. Rather, such events tend to be indicative of larger trends that collectively make up the big picture.

Also: Top Linux Stories Roundup 2012

The best of Linux - made on a Mac

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Linux
Mac

itwire.com: The Linux Foundation has released a video of what it sees as the 2012 highlights for Linux - but the presence of decent video-creation and editing software running on Linux does not seem to be one of them.

How removing 386 support in Linux will destroy the world

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Linux

networkworld.com: As you may have heard by now, the Linux kernel is dropping support for the 386 processor. It's okay. I'll wait right here while you finish pushing over monitors and flipping over every desk at work in a nerd rage. I did the same thing.

Three new features coming in Linux Mint 15

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Linux

pcworld.com: It's been just a few weeks since the launch of Linux Mint 14 “Nadia,” but already the project behind the popular distribution has been making plans for its next release.

The 5 Most Important Linux Projects of 2012

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Linux

linux.com: Mandrake Linux was my best early experience with Linux, way back in the last millennium, back when literal floppy disks roamed the Earth and 4 megabytes of RAM was riches. Back then you could buy boxed sets of Red Hat Linux in stores, and Red Hat was popular as a desktop Linux.

12 Days of Christmas: What open source has given us

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Linux
OSS

techrepublic.com: Jack Wallen plants his tongue in his cheek and has a go at the Twelve Days of Christmas — open source style!

A conversation with Bradley Kuhn

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

h-online.com: The H talks with Bradley Kuhn, noted GPL compliance enforcer, about whether there should be more people patrolling the GPL perimeter and what tools and techniques a potential protector should take into battle.

Linux Developers Promise Better Touch Support

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Linux
Gadgets

thevarguy.com: If all goes according to plan, future versions of the open source operating system may come with significant touch support built in, according to developers. And if that happens, it could have major implications throughout the channel.

Linus Torvalds on Linux and the future of computing

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Linux
Interviews

computing.co.uk: In the first part of our three-part interview, Linux pioneer Linus Torvalds talked about how he got into computing, Raspberry Pi and the "free software" movement. In the second part, Torvalds takes us from Linux in the real world to the future of computing.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 487

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Linux

Welcome to this year's 51st issue of DistroWatch Weekly! The popularity of Arch Linux, combined with the project's philosophy that appeals to more advanced Linux users, has resulted in an explosion of Arch-based distributions with a variety of desktop environments and user-friendly features.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver

today's howtos

Distro Development: Rescatux and Bodhi

  • Rescatux 0.40 beta 9 released
    Many code in the grub side and in the windows registry side has been rewritten so that these new features could be rewritten. As a consequence it will be easier to maintain Rescapp. Finally the chntpw based options which modify the Windows registry now perform a backup of the Windows registry files in the unlikely case you want to undo some of the changes that Rescapp performs. I guess that in the future there will be a feature to be able to restore such backups from Rescapp itself, but, let’s focus on releasing an stable release. It’s been a while since the last one. UEFI feedback is still welcome. Specially if the Debian installation disks work for you but not the Rescatux ones.
  • Bodhi 4.0.0 Updates and July Donation Totals
    Late last month I posted a first alpha look at Bodhi 4.0.0. Work since then has been coming along slowly due to a few unpredictable issues and my own work schedule outside of Bodhi being hectic over the summer. Bodhi 4.0.0 will be happening, but likely not with a stable release until September. I am traveling again this weekend, but am hoping to get out a full alpha release with 32bit and non-PAE discs next week.