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Linux

Upstart SolidXK Distro Seeks First Business Customers

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Linux

SolydXK started last March as the unofficial Linux Mint Debian Edition with KDE. Though there had been speculation that an official KDE version of the popular desktop distribution would surface, ZDNet wrote recently, SolydXK co-founders Arjen Balfoort and Amadeu Ferreira took it upon themselves, with the support of other Mint community members, to actually build it.

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Intel headgear to offer fast offline voice processing

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Linux
Hardware
Gadgets

So far, Linux is the only supported OS Intel has mentioned for either the original single-core Quark or the dual-core model.

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Review: Manjaro Linux 0.8.9 (Cinnamon edition)

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Linux

Arch Linux is highly respected throughout the Linux community as a cutting edge, well designed, rolling-release Linux distro with superb documentation. But at the same time, it is also discarded as a non-option by many Linux users, including experienced ones, for being time consuming to install and configure. I fall into this latter group. So, what's a self-respecting Linux user supposed to do if (s)he wants to run Arch Linux but doesn't want to a dedicate a whole weekend to it? Enter Manjaro, a Linux distro based on Arch. It is important to note that Manjaro is not just a re-branded Arch spin. In fact, it's not truly an Arch system, and it does not use the Arch binary package repositories. But it's dependent on Arch and it supposedly maintains all of the desirable features of Arch, while at the same time trying to mitigate or solve some of Arch's less than desirable traits. We will now proceed to examine Manjaro from quite a few different angles to see if it reaches its goal. Most of the screenshots in this review show the new look featured in the 0.8.9 version of Manjaro Cinnamon.

More Decay Of Wintel Seen In 2014

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Linux
Hardware
Microsoft

Further, Wintel cannot even compete on price/performance at the low end because M$ charges way too much for licensing and restricting the freedom of users to use the hardware they buy to fullest potential. That just won’t fly any longer. There are OEMs who want to compete selling small cheap computers of every kind and they will ship Android/Linux, Chrome OS/Linux and GNU/Linux in 2014. You can bet on that. Margins are too small in this segment to pay the Wintel tax.

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KDE Desktop vs. GNOME Apps: The Great Paradox

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KDE
Linux

A paradox lies at the center of the Linux desktop today. For all their limitations, reader polls consistently show that KDE is the single most popular desktop, preferred by just under a third of users. Yet at the same time, 40-45% use a desktop that sits on top of GNOME technology, such as GNOME3, Cinnamon, Mate, or Unity.

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5 Bleeding Edge Linux Distributions that are Actually Stable

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Linux

What is a Bleeding Edge Linux Distribution ? Bleeding Edge Distribution is a distribution developed by technologies incorporating those so new that they could have a high risk of being unreliable. No matter how much we want to use these distributions, they will always have stability issues. Well, we are here to prove that wrong.

5 Must Have Steam Titles on Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Gamers on Linux are in heaven after the arrival of Steam and with a decent catalogue being updated aggressively by Valve, future for gaming on Linux looks bright. But chances are you may be a hardcore Linux enthusiast, with no or least interest in gaming but after Steam’s arrival, you want to give Gaming a try but don’t know where to start. We are here to help.

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First ever CryEngine Game to head for Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Kingdom Come: Deliverance is set to be the first ever game on Linux that is based on the CryEngine. According to the Kickstarter page for the open world Role Playing Game (RPG) there will be Linux support for the game when it releases which is slated to be the fourth quarter of 2015.

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Four must try Indie games on Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Linux dominates almost every part of our lives – it powers services like Facebook to Google, it powers ATM machines, our printers, routers, stock exchanges, NASA missions and drones. Linux now also dominates the consumer space, thanks to Android and ChromeOS. And it’s going to further increase its presence in 2014. Gaming used to be one area where Linux was in a weaker position but that’s going to change with SteamOS. There are a lot of games which are available for GNU/Linux based operating systems and our game correspondent Partha has picked four games that he thinks you must try. Read on…

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24-Way AMD Radeon vs. NVIDIA GeForce Linux Graphics Card Comparison

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Linux

After this weekend carrying out a 25-way open-source Linux graphics driver comparison featuring AMD Radeon, Intel HD Graphics, and NVIDIA GeForce hardware, the tables have now turned to look at nearly the same assortment of hardware but when using the high-performance, proprietary Linux graphics drivers. We've also upped the demanding OpenGL benchmarks used -- including the Source Engine -- as we see how the AMD and NVIDIA binary graphics drivers are doing to start 2014.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Still at It

5 open source RSS feed readers

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds. And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too. Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use
    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity
    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.
  • Gammu 1.38.2
    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations. The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.
  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics
    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow. In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.
  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn
    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?
    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.