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Linux

Supercomputer speed

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

It wasn’t always that way. Whizz back to 1998 when Linux was still clawing its way out of the primordial binary ooze and just a single supercomputer ran it. Jump forward six years and that figure had exploded to 291 of the top-500 supercomputers and Linux never looked back. Now, I’m no expert (we could probably stop the sentence there) in supercomputers, but the benefits of a GNU/Linux OS apply as much to your home user as they do to supercomputer manufacturers. There’s no per-core licence to worry about – which becomes a big worry if you have 3.1 million processors to power.

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Want a fulfilling IT career? Learn Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

How can understanding Linux enhance a career? This question is interesting because there are two drastically different answers. The first is the obvious answer that you can find through websites and studies everywhere, but the second is a little more subtle. And a lot more awesome.

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UbuConLA: Firefox OS on show in Cartagena

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

If you are attending UbuConLA I would strongly encourage you to check out the talks on Firefox OS and Webmaker. In addition to the talks, there will also be a Firefox OS workshop where attendees can go more hands on.

When the organizers of UbuConLA reached out to me several months ago, I knew we really had to have a Mozilla presence at this event so that Ubuntu Users who are already using Firefox as their browser of choice could learn about other initiatives like Firefox OS and Webmaker.

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Linux mainframe faces off against the server farm

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Should you deploy Linux on the mainframe?

There are plenty of positives and negatives that make it clear that a Linux mainframe isn't right for all IT shops. Two experts go head to head on how to decide what's right for your data center: Linux workloads on a mainframe or running them in a distributed server environment.

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Chromebook sales to nearly triple by 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Google's Chromebook might not be setting the consumer world on fire yet but its stocks are set to rise, with new research predicting sales of Chromebooks will reach 5.2 million units in 2014, a 79% increase from 2013,

By 2017, sales of Chromebooks are set to nearly triple to reach 14.4 million units, with the main driver being the US education market, which currently accounts for nearly 85% of all sales.

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Hidden Linux Benefits, Clear Linux Challenges

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have tried and enjoyed a number of great Linux distributions over the years. Some were more popular than others. But the one thing they all have in common is each provides the end user with hidden benefits and unexpected disadvantages over proprietary desktop operating systems.

In this article, I'll explore what make the Linux desktop a superb fit for some users while providing thoughts on overcoming the challenges had by others.

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Is Linux More Secure than Windows?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Security

When it comes to control systems, a common question has long been: Is Linux inherently more secure than Windows? Being a fan of Linux/Unix systems, I desperately want to answer “yes” to this question. During the 1980s and 1990s, so much of the work I was involved in ran under Unix. These days I run Linux on my home computer, and once a year I boot up a Windows XP virtual machine running under Virtual Box, to run my tax software. In the office, I rant about the lousy Windows operating system (OS) and ask why the world doesn’t switch to Linux. And as much as I hate to admit it, as a system integrator I am mostly locked into dealing with Microsoft’s flavor of the month operating system because of customer standards and the tools available.

From the appearance of “Brain,” which is recognized as the first computer virus, in 1986, to Stuxnet to the Zotob worm (the virus that knocked 13 of DaimlerChrysler’s U.S. automobile manufacturing plants offline), one thing all these viruses have in common is that they were directed at Microsoft’s operating systems. However, according to Zone-H (an archive of defaced websites), in a statistics report for the period 2005-2007: “In the past the most attacked operating system was Windows, but many servers were migrated from Windows to Linux… Therefore the attacks migrated as well, as Linux is now the most attacked operating system with 1, 485,280 defacements against 815,119 in Windows systems (numbers calculated since 2000).”

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Solar plant monitoring system taps Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Storm Energy has upgraded its “SunSniffer” solar plant monitoring system to a Linux-based platform running on a Raspberry Pi SBC.

Germany-based Storm Energy is the latest of a growing number of companies building commercial products based on the hackable Raspberry Pi single board computer. The company’s SunSniffer system is designed to monitor photovoltaic (PV) solar power installations of all sizes, and the latest version can also control the equipment, says the company. The new SunSniffer version adds a Raspberry Pi SBC along with a custom expansion board and customized Linux OS, which combine to enhance the system’s flexibility and upgradability.

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Linux game: Garry’s Mod

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Gaming

Garry’s mod is one of the most sold games for Linux on Steam, so I’ve decided to publish this review of the game, first published on devtome.com

Garry’s Mod, developed by Facepunch is without a doubt one of the most enjoyable and hilarious games that I have ever played. Out of the box, the game is perhaps one of the ultimate sandbox games available anywhere. You spawn in the middle of an open area that you choose and you can spawn in just about any item or NPC that you can think of. This game is also probably one of the best physics simulators available. The entire game revolves around physics. In this game you are able to do whatever you heart desires and although I say that with a lot of different games, I truly mean it with Garry’s Mod. Whatever you want. If you want to build an airplane out of a bathtub and some planks of wood, then be my guest. You can simply spawn in the materials that you want and then use tools to “weld” them together. Using weight tools you can make these items very light, which will allow them to become airborne. This game definitely deserves lots of praise.

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The 5 easiest to use modern Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

These are the 5 Linux distributions that I would recommend to new Linux users and to people who just want to use their computer as a computer and who aren't that interested in getting too deep and dirty with their operating system.

This list could easily have been the 10 easiest to use Linux distributions but 5 is a good number because it shows new users just where to begin yet still provides a limited amount of choice.

As I mentioned in the introduction these Linux distributions work better when installed on modern computers. If you have an older computer there is another list coming shortly.

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6-Way Enterprise Focused Linux Distribution Comparison With An Intel Core i9, Dual Xeon Gold Systems

Here's our latest Linux distribution comparison with this time looking at the out-of-the-box performance of six Linux distributions while running a range of enterprise/workstation-focused benchmarks while using two systems. One system is a high-end Core i9 7980XE desktop system and the other a Tyan 1U Xeon Scalable server with dual Xeon Gold 6138 processors. Read more

Security: FOSS Versus Windows

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more