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Kdbus Will Likely Be Merged Into The Kernel This Year

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Linux

All of the code for kdbus is living within its own Git repository right now and also there's code within the systemd Git while a compile-time switch must be activated now within systemd. Developers are hoping kdbus will be reviewed and merged into the upstream Linux kernel this year. Lennart shared a couple of kdbus features out on the horizon include sandboxing support, yielding CPU time to destination, priority inheritance, and priority queues.

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Geeksphone's dual-boot Android Firefox OS device coming next week

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Linux
Google
Moz/FF

Spanish smartphone maker Geeksphone has revealed more details on its forthcoming dual-boot Android and Firefox OS device.

The phone, known as the Revolution, will go on sale next week at a cost of €289 in Europe. The device will run both Android and Boot2Gecko, otherwise known as Firefox OS. (Mozilla only lets the mobile carriers it has deals with use the Firefox OS brand name, so for now, Geeksphone is stuck with the operating system's clunkier handle.)

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Maker of China’s domestic desktop OS goes dark, leaves employees without pay

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Linux
Microsoft

The Chinese government has already stated its discontent with Windows 8, which comes preinstalled on almost all new PCs. It says an upgrade to Windows 8 would cause a substantial increase in costs both for the OS and relevant software. Windows 8 accounts for less than three percent of the Chinese market.

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Has Linux Conquered the Cloud?

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Linux

The only challenge left for Linux to fully conquer the cloud is in the private and hybrid sectors. Private cloud technology like OpenStack is pushing Linux kernel-based virtual machines, or KVMs, on the compute side and challenging VMware's position, asserted Turk.

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Linux IT ditches top-level job titles in bid to democratise firm

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Linux

"The way Linux IT was driven in the past was very much bottom-line focused," he said. "It was about how to create a profitable company and follow the market for the return on investment for shareholders. It was typical of an IT company in the early stages of development.

"But what's changed now is we have democratised it, spread the shareholding and for the time being, held back on applying labels to individuals [in the management team]."

Mitchell has recently completed an MBA qualification and said his dissertation focused on the idea of spiritual leadership - a concept which focuses on business ethics and employee wellbeing. He said the research has played a big role in the new-look Linux IT.

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Experiments with my new laptop, Linux and UEFI

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Linux

In this context I use 'critical' to indicate the parts which sometimes give Linux difficulty, such as the graphic controller (ATI/AMD Radeon in this case), wi-fi adapter (Atheros) and such. Installation was absolutely routine, exactly as I have described several times before on several other UEFI systems.

I left Secure Boot enabled, and I had no problem booting the Live USB image. Fedora installed its own signed "shim" file, so the installed image also boots just fine with UEFI Secure Boot enabled — and, of course, also with Secure Boot disabled, duh.

During the installation, it added Fedora to the UEFI boot list and it modified the UEFI boot sequence to place Fedora first; when I rebooted after installation, it booted up Grub (and then Fedora), exactly as it "should". I was extremely pleased and impressed with this, and I started to think that perhaps HP had improved its UEFI BIOS operation (although it seems I was wrong).

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Ads in Firefox, Debian init, and Rolling Releases

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Linux

Lots of folks are lamenting the latest news from Mozilla stating they'll soon be showing users "sponsored content from hand-picked partners." In other news, a recent Debian decision leaves Ubuntu on its own with upstart. Matt Hartley recently compared the ease of Ubuntu to the flexibility of rolling release distributions.

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Steam client update ‘dramatically’ improves in-home experience

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Linux
Gaming

Valve has pushed another update to it’s Steam Client which brings many improvements to In-Home Steaming. Before you go ahead to download the client keep in mind that there is an issue with the updater which may download two or three times before ‘settling down’, as Sloken writes on the Steam Community page.

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Intel Bay Trail NUC Linux Performance Preview

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Linux
Hardware

A full and proper comparison of the NUC DN2820FYK performance under Linux is forthcoming that will closely examine all areas of performance from Ubuntu 14.04 with the Linux 3.13~3.14 kernel. There will also be many other interesting Bay Trail Linux tests. Those results though are not done today and due to many Phoronix readers asking for some Bay Trail results, I quickly ran some tests this week against the CompuLab Utilite review numbers from the recent review of that nice ARM Linux PC.

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Sailfish OS is coming to Android Devices

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Linux
Hardware

If you are impressed with Jolla’s Sailfish OS but do not want to exchange your current Android phone for the Jolla smartphone, the finnish company has some good news for you. In a recent blog post, Jolla has announced that they are bringing Sailfish OS to Android devices.

We have already witnessed Sailfish OS being ported to Nexus 4, Nexus 5 and Nexus 7, but Jolla is trying to extend the support to other Android hardwares as well.

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Containers News

  • How Kubernetes is making contributing easy
    As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly. Among the topics we covered in the podcast were the challenges inherent in shifting from a company-led project to a community-led one, principles that can lead to more successful communities, and how to structure decision-making.
  • How Microsoft helped Docker with LinuxKit and Moby Project [Ed: Microsoft 'helped'... embrace, extend, coerce; haven't Docker employees learned from history?]
    Today, supporting Linux is as critical to Microsoft as it is to Red Hat and SUSE.
  • How to make branding decisions in an open community
    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match. Reaction from the Docker community has been overwhelmingly negative. As of this writing, the Moby pull request has garnered 7 upvotes and 110 downvotes on GitHub. The Docker community is understandably frustrated by this opaque announcement of a fait accompli, an important decision that a hidden inner circle made behind closed doors. It's a textbook case of "Why wasn't I consulted?"

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner. That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week. While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer. Read more

FOSS in European Public Services

  • France: How a high school association finally obtained a source code
    In October 2016, the association Droit des Lycéens, which represents French high school students and helps them assert their rights, finally obtained the source code of an algorithm that influences students’ choice of university after the Baccalauréat exam. This puts an end to a conflict lasting more than seven months between the association and the Ministry of Education, which until then had refused to publish the source code of its tool. The opening of algorithms and calculators is a flagship measure in the French law for a digital republic that was passed in 2016. Since then, France has started to publish some source codes, such as the personal tax calculator in April 2016. This may have created a precedent for the present case, according to the association. The algorithm in question forms the core of the APB (Admission Post-Bac) online platform, which is used by all students in France. It allows them to enter their preferences in terms of universities and syllabus, and helps match applicants to available places. But Droit des Lycéens believes that the calculation method has been kept secret by the Ministry, and lacks transparency.
  • OFE welcomes continued emphasis on openness in EIF
    The OpenForum Europe (OFE) think tank welcomes the publication of the European Interoperability Framework (EIF). This document continues to emphasise the importance of openness, the organisation writes on its blog.
  • Czech Finance Ministry app boosts open data, source
    A data visualisation application developed in 2015 by the Czech Ministry of Finance, is helping to promote the publication of open data, and is making the case for open source software development across the government. The tool, called Supervizor, was one of the winners of the European Commission’s Sharing and Reuse Award. At the Sharing and Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal), on 29 March, Supervizor was awarded EUR 15,000 - to help the project expands its reach.

Leftovers: Gaming