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The Linux desktop-a-week review: MATE

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

One thing that MATE has in common with both Enlightenment and Awesome is the general peppiness. Everything in MATE is just plain snappy and light on resource usage. And you could say that memory/CPU usage isn't a huge deal with modern hardware. But, in my testing on this i5 with 8 gigs of RAM, MATE is so much more responsive than GNOME Shell, KDE or Unity that it's just plain silly.

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The cloud might be the key to the triumph of desktop Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

There's no denying the power and utility value of the cloud. We all use it and it's certainly something that most Linux users can appreciate. However, I disagree with the basic premise of the article that Linux "Linux needs...a major win in the desktop arena." Why? Linux is alive and well, and doing just fine without having tons of desktop market share.

I'm not sure where this obsession with market share comes from, but I think it's an altogether unhealthy thing. And it's particularly bad when you consider that mobile devices have been chipping away steadily at desktop usage across all platforms. I'd much rather see Linux offer more mobile device options than trying to go on some quixotic quest to gain desktop market share when most users are moving away from the desktop anyway.

The author uses Chromebooks as an example, and I can understand his affection for them. For what they do they are fine computing devices, and their popularity can't be questioned at this point (as always see Amazon's list of bestselling laptops to see just how popular they are right now). But we already have Chromebooks, so why do we need a Linux "cloudbook?"

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Fedora Linux Developers Eye Docker and More for Fedora Cloud

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Fedora.next, the major revamping of Fedora Linux, is shaping up to feature tight integration with container-based virtualization for the cloud, according to a recent discussion among developers of the open source operating system, which forms the basis for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

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Web app dev kit supports Android and Ubuntu

Filed under
Android
Development
Linux
Ubuntu

Toshiba Electronics has introduced two starter kits for early development of web applications using the Toshiba TZ5000 Application Processor Lite (ApP Lite) series.

The RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 and RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 starter kits provide drivers for internet applications using HTML5.

Both kits provide drivers for video playback using Wireless LAN and HDMI output, with the RBTZ5000-2MA-A1 on Ubuntu Linux, and the RBTZ5000-6MA-A1 on an Android 4.4 platform.

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The Companies that Support Linux: Daynix Consults on Cloud and Virtualization Technologies

Filed under
Linux

The modern data center is rapidly evolving, with the advent of cloud computing bringing new technologies, tools and best practices. As enterprises seek to understand and take advantage of emerging areas in virtualization and the cloud such as software-defined networking and storage, microservers and containers, many are seeking third-party consultants and services to ease the transition.

Daynix is a software development and consulting company based in Israel that helps companies navigate this new world of cloud infrastructure and virtualization. Its services range from hypervisors and paravirtualized devices development to cloud infrastructure. The company also works closely with open source communities on cloud-related technologies, which are rooted in Linux.

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$149 networking security gizmo runs Snort on OpenWRT

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Itus Networks is set to launch a $149 “iGuardian” network security appliance on Kickstarter that runs OpenWRT Linux and the Snort IPS stack on a MIPS64 SoC.

Few vendors have targeted the consumer network security appliance market, and even fewer have done so with pricing under $500. A San Jose, Calif.-based startup called Itus Networks, however, plans to protect your home WiFi router with a $149, open source Linux iGuardian device that offers both a network intrusion prevention system (NIPS) and a network intrusion detection system (NIDS). The device blocks cyber attacks while also filtering out malware “and other undesirable content,” says the company. Like other network security appliances, it sits between your Internet source and your WiFi router, acting as a security firewall.

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Evolve OS Alpha 3 Is a Gorgeous Linux OS with a Brand New Desktop Experience

Filed under
Linux

Evolve OS, a Linux distribution that it's still under development and which boasts a beautiful new desktop environment called Budgie, has just got its third Alpha release.

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IPFire 2.15 Core 80 Is a Powerful and Free Linux Firewall OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Michael Tremer, a developer for the ipfire.org team, has announced that IPFire 2.13 Core 80, a new stable build of the popular Linux-based firewall distribution, has been released and is now available for download.

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Ubuntu Spotted Flying Over the Antarctic During a NASA Mission

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu community has made a habit of spotting their favorite operating system in the most unexpected places. The Linux distribution built by Canonical has been observed “flying” over an Antarctic region, during a NASA mission.

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Xen EFI Support Being Added To Linux 3.17

Filed under
Linux

With the Linux 3.17 kernel that's now officially under development since yesterday's Linux 3.16 release is now support for Xen EFI.

With the upcoming Linux 3.17, it's possible to boot using (U)EFI under Xen Dom0. Daniel Kiper who worked on the Xen EFI patches explained, "Standard EFI Linux Kernel infrastructure cannot be used because it requires direct access to EFI data and code. However, in dom0 case it is not possible because above mentioned EFI stuff is fully owned and controlled by Xen hypervisor. In this case all calls from dom0 to EFI must be requested via special hypercall which in turn executes relevant EFI code in behalf of dom0."

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The Linux Kernel Is Still Rectifying The Year 2038 Problem

The Linux kernel is still working to rectify the Year 2038 problem whereby the time values stored as signed 32-bit integers will wrap around. If you somehow are not familiar with the Year 2038 "Y2038" problem, you can learn more via Wikipedia. The Linux kernel has been receiving fixes and workarounds for years now through many Y2038 commits to work through the many different areas of the kernel that are relying upon 32-bit signed ints for storing time values. With Linux 4.15, this work has continued. Read more

Linux 4.15 Is A Huge Update For Both AMD CPU & Radeon GPU Owners

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Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more