Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Rugged DAQ system runs real-time Linux

Filed under
Linux

NI unveiled a rugged 4-slot “CompactDAQ” system for data acquisition and control (DAQ), with real-time Linux, an Atom E3825, and optional sensor modules.

Usually, when you have a choice of Windows or Linux, the Windows version costs more. In the case of the National Instruments (NI) CompactDAQ cDAQ-9134 Controller, however, it’s the Linux version that costs $500 more, at $4,999. That’s because it’s a special real-time Linux variant called NI Linux Real-Time, also available on NI’s CompactRIO cRIO-9068 controller and sbRIO-9651 computer-on-module, both of which are based on the Xilinx Zynq-7020 system-on-chip. The cDAQ-9134 instead runs on a dual-core, 1.33GHz Intel Atom E3825 SoC.

Read more

DMA-BUF Cross-Device Synchronization Hits Linux 3.17

Filed under
Linux

The work that was ongoing for months to provide DMA-BUF cross-device synchronization and fencing is finally landing with the Linux 3.17 kernel.

The patches by Maarten Lankhorst for DMA-BUF cross-device synchronization were up to eighteen revisions and are now finally in a condition to be merged with Linux 3.17 via the driver core subsystem pull. DMA-BUF has now proper fence and poll support along with other new functionality that affects many different kernel drivers. For Phoronix readers, one of the benefits of DMA-BUF cross-device synchronization is to reduce tearing when sharing buffers between multiple GPU DRM drivers.

Read more

Sonar GNOME 2014.1 Is a Linux OS Built for People with Impairments – Gallery

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Sonar GNOME 2014.1, a Linux distribution based on Manjaro and Arch Linux and developed specifically for people with various impairments, has been released and is now available for download.

Read more

ExTiX 14.1.2 Shows Users What They Can Do with Ubuntu 14.04, a Fancy Dock, and a Custom Kernel

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

ExTiX 14.1.2 64-bit, a distribution based on the recently launched operating system from Canonical, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, has been officially released.

The developer rebased the distribution on the newer Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) a while ago and this new build is mostly about updates and fixes. Users are provided with a GNOME 3.10 desktop and GNOME Classic 3.10. For users who want a lighter system, Razor-qt 0.5.2 is also available in ExTiX Light.

Read more

Ugoos reveals Cortex-A5 Android 4.4 TV dongle

Filed under
Android
Linux

Ugoos is prepping an Android 4.4 “S85″ media player dongle with a quad-core Amlogic S805 Cortex-A5 SoC clocked to 1.5GHz, and a quad-core Mali-450 GPU.

Ugoos has spun a variety of Android media player boxes and dongles over the last few years, including a UT3 box, featuring Rockchip’s quad-core, Cortex-A17 RK3288 system-on-chip with a 16-core Mali-T760 GPU, now selling for $130. Before that was the Ugoos UT2, with the quad-core, Cortex-A9 RK3188 SoC clocked to 1.6GHz, with a Mali-400 GPU. Last year, the Chinese company introduced a dongle-style UM2 stick, running on the same RK3188 and Mali-400 GPU.

Read more

F2FS Gains New Features With Linux 3.17

Filed under
Linux

The Samsung supported Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) will sport some new functionality with the Linux 3.17 kernel release.

The user-facing work found with the F2FS file-system for Linux 3.17 includes the major following work:

- A nobarrier mount option has been added to F2FS, similar to other file-systems. With this option the file-system keeps the I/O ordering but ignores information about cache flushes inside the storages.

Read more

Intel Graphics Installer for Linux Arrives with Latest Drivers and Ubuntu

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

The Intel Graphics Installer for Linux, a tool that allows users to easily install the latest graphics and video drivers for their Intel graphics hardware, is now at version 1.0.6 and is ready for download.

Read more

Shuffling Zombie Juror – aka Linux kernel 3.16 – wants to eat … ARMs?

Filed under
Linux

You'll be excited by 3.16 if you're keen to run Linux on Samsung's Exynos or other ARM SoCs. Those keen on ARM CPUs as data centre alternatives to x86 will be pleased to note work to help Xen virtual machines suspend and resume. There's also a boot-from-firmware feature on ARM.

Collectively, these three additions inch Linux towards being even more attractive and capable on ARM platforms, which will interest those keen on making the architecture a viable data centre alternative.

Read more

The Linux desktop-a-week review: MATE

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

One thing that MATE has in common with both Enlightenment and Awesome is the general peppiness. Everything in MATE is just plain snappy and light on resource usage. And you could say that memory/CPU usage isn't a huge deal with modern hardware. But, in my testing on this i5 with 8 gigs of RAM, MATE is so much more responsive than GNOME Shell, KDE or Unity that it's just plain silly.

Read more

The cloud might be the key to the triumph of desktop Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

There's no denying the power and utility value of the cloud. We all use it and it's certainly something that most Linux users can appreciate. However, I disagree with the basic premise of the article that Linux "Linux needs...a major win in the desktop arena." Why? Linux is alive and well, and doing just fine without having tons of desktop market share.

I'm not sure where this obsession with market share comes from, but I think it's an altogether unhealthy thing. And it's particularly bad when you consider that mobile devices have been chipping away steadily at desktop usage across all platforms. I'd much rather see Linux offer more mobile device options than trying to go on some quixotic quest to gain desktop market share when most users are moving away from the desktop anyway.

The author uses Chromebooks as an example, and I can understand his affection for them. For what they do they are fine computing devices, and their popularity can't be questioned at this point (as always see Amazon's list of bestselling laptops to see just how popular they are right now). But we already have Chromebooks, so why do we need a Linux "cloudbook?"

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Is your company an open source parasite?

Getting involved in the open source projects that matter to a company, in other words, gives them more ability to influence their future today, even as dependence on a vendor results in putting one's future in the hands of that vendor to resolve on their timetable. It's simply not smart business, not if an open source alternative exists and your company already depends upon it. In sum, the GitHub contributor counts should be much higher, and not merely for those in the business of selling software (or tech, generally). Any company defined by software—and that's your company, too—needs to get more involved in both using and contributing open source software. Read more

LibreELEC Embedded Linux OS Now Compatible with Windows 10 Fall Creators Update

The LibreELEC 8.2.1 update is based on the latest Kodi 17.6 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software and it mostly patches some Samba (SMB) "file exists" share errors on Windows 10 Fall Creators Update by updating the protocol to Samba 4.6.10, implementing SMB client options for minimum SMB protocol and an SMB legacy security option with NTLMv1, and disabling SPNEGO. "LibreELEC 8.2.x includes changes that allow the Kodi SMB client and our embedded Samba server to support SMB2/3 connections; deprecating SMB1 to improve security and performance. This is necessary to cope with changes Microsoft introduced in the Windows 10 ‘Fall Creators Update’ to resolve SMB1 security issues," explained the developers. Read more

Canonical Releases Major Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 to Fix 13 Security Flaws

The update is a major one patching a total of 13 security flaws, including race conditions in Linux kernel's ALSA subsystem, the packet fanout implementation, and the key management subsystem, as well as use-after-free vulnerabilities in both the USB serial console driver and the ALSA subsystem. Various other issues were also patched for Linux kernel's key management subsystem, the Ultra Wide Band driver, the ALSA subsystem, the USB unattached storage driver, and the USB subsystem, which received the most attention in this update as several security flaws were recently disclosed. Read more

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD