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Video: Which Super Hero Would the Linux Community Be?

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Linux

A Reddit thread posted earlier this week posed the question, “What if Linux distros were super heroes?” Would Ubuntu be Superman? We'll leave it to the Redditors to debate that one. But we can weigh in on the question “Which super hero would Linux community be?”

The developers, system administrators, architects, business managers, and community leaders who attended LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America this week are all Linux super heroes. But this year some attendees also decided to dress the part – mingling in the hallway track and attending sessions as their favorite hero as part of the event's first ever Comic Book Hero Day and costume contest.

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Cheapo Firefox OS mobes to debut in India – definitely not one for selfie-conscious users

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Linux
Moz/FF

The Mozilla Foundation's aim to create a Firefox OS for mobile devices was not to take a quixotic tilt at the top end of the smartphone market. Instead, it hoped to provide an alternative that would enable the delivery of low-cost, but still smart, devices to places where smartphones are still a significant purchase.

That plan looks to be working in India, where local outfit Spicephone has just announced it will offer the nation's first Firefox-OS-powered phone for Rs 2,299 (US$38, £23).

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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

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GNU
Linux

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information.

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Linux is Evolving

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Linux

Again, using the flexible building blocks that Linux is built out of in interesting and creative ways to build something new and amazing. It is incredible to look at the previous generation of server operating systems, which often threw in everything plus Firefox, KDE, and the kitchen sink, and compare that to where we are going now. Small, modular, special purpose server distributions that are miles away from the desktop or what we had before, but still sharing the same open source Linux core.
The evolution of Linux continues to be endlessly fascinating, I can’t wait to see what comes next.

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Patch By Patch, LLVM Clang Gets Better At Building The Linux Kernel

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Development
Linux
BSD

With each kernel revision, LLVM Clang gets closer to being able to build the mainline Linux kernel. There's now just a few dozen patches outstanding for LLVMLinux to be a mainline success.

Behan Webster gave his usual talk at LinuxCon in Chicago this week about the state of LLVMLinux -- building the Linux kernel with Clang rather than GCC. There's been many Phoronix articles about the topic so there isn't too much more to share beyond that many developers want to use Clang to compile the Linux kernel to lead to better code portability of the kernel, faster compilation times of Clang, potential performance differences, LLVM and Clang are more liberally licensed, and there's a host of other development extras with Clang.

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Munich Council Say Talk of LiMux Demise Is Greatly Exaggerated

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Linux
OSS

A Munich city council spokesman has attempted to clarify the reasons behind its plan to re-examine the role of open-source software in local government IT systems.

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Operating System U

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OS
Linux
Reviews

Are you tired of being forced to upgrade your Operating System regularly? What about the unnecessary changes that end up being made, changes that you don’t even want, much less need? How would you like to pick and choose what aspects of your operating system you want upgraded, and leave the ones you know, love, and are accustomed to how they are?

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Backup Your PC with Clonezilla Live 2.2.4-1

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Linux

Clonezilla Live, a Linux distribution based on DRBL, Partclone, and udpcast that allows users to do bare metal backup and recovery, is now at version 2.2.4-1 and is ready for testing.

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An update on Plasma Addons

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GNU
KDE
Linux

Since my last blog post on plasma addons there has been a lot of activity, existing contributors are active on their own plasmoids, and there are many new faces coming on to take up the challenge of maintaining their own small part of Plasma.

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IoT tinkerers get new Linux hub & open platforms

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GNU
Linux

Cloud Media, the maker of entertainment box Popcorn Hour, launched a project on Kickstarter, Inc. that will add to the growing number of smart hubs for people to connect and control smart devices. Called the STACK Box, it features a Cavium ARM11 core processor, 256MB DDR3 RAM, 512MB flash, SD slot, 802.11n WiFi, Bluetooth LE 4.0, Z-Wave, standard 10/100 Ethernet port, optional X10 wired communication, 5 USB 2.0 ports, RS-232 port, 2 optocoupler I/O, Xbee Bus, Raspberry Pi-compatible 26-pin bus and runs Linus Kernel 3.10. IT also features optional wireless communications for Dust Networks and Insteon with RF433/315, EnOcean, ZigBee, XBee, DCLink, RFID, IR coming soon.

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Parrot Security 3.10 Ethical Hacking OS Adds Full Firejail/AppArmor Sandboxing

ParrotSec devs released today a new stable version of their Debian-based Parrot Security OS ethical hacking and penetration testing GNU/Linux distribution. There are many enhancements implemented in the Parrot Security OS 3.10 release, but the biggest new feature is the introduction of a full Firejail and AppArmor sandboxing system that should proactively protect the operating system from attacks by isolating its components with the combination of various security techniques. "The first experiments were already introduced in Parrot 3.9 with the inclusion of Firejail, but we took almost a month of hard work to make it even better with the improvement of many profiles, the introduction of the AppArmor support and enough time to make all the tests," reads today's announcement. Read more Also: Parrot 3.10 is out

GNOME 3.27.3 Released

  • GNOME 3.27.3 released
    GNOME 3.27.3, the third development snapshot in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. A few more modules have been ported to meson, and lots of development is happening across all modules. To point out a few highlights, dconf-editor is seeing significant work, and evolution has had many bug fixes.
  • GNOME 3.27.3 Brings More Meson Ports, Redesign To DConf Editor
    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat announced the release of GNOME 3.27.3 this weekend. GNOME 3.27.3 is the latest in a string of development releases leading up to the stable GNOME 3.28 debut in March.
  • GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Gets Third Development Snapshot, More Meson Ports
    GNOME leader Matthias Clasen announced a few moments ago the availability of the third development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. The development cycle of the upcoming GNOME 3.28 desktop environment continues today with the GNOME 3.27.3 milestone, which ports more components to the Meson build system and adds various improvements to various apps and tools, including the Evolution email and calendar client, NetworkManager network connection manager, and dconf-editor.

Review: OnePlus 5T

Have you ever arrived at a party, looked around, and realized you’re totally underdressed? It’s a panic-inducing moment. This nightmare scenario happened to OnePlus earlier this year. Its OnePlus 5 had the brains to match any competing Android device, but next to phones like the Galaxy S8, LG G6, iPhone X, it looked, well, dowdy. With thick, squared off bezels and an eyesore of a home button, it was so last season. For four years, OnePlus has pinned its entire identity to the idea that it sells the phone with the highest specs at the lowest price. Instead of paying $850+ for a fancy phone from the likes of Google or Samsung, you can buy a nearly identical, slightly off-brand OnePlus for $500 or less. It was the phone those in the know would recommend to save a few hundred bucks and still have a brag-worthy device. But you couldn’t brag about the OnePlus 5, especially after some bugs plagued the device. Read more

Android Leftovers