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Internet Radio with Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

Less fascinating than the old radio technology by “internet radio” we are able to send “radio” communication far beyond the range of “wireless” radio. In the current and in following articles, we would like to approach the topic of radio and audio broadcasting on TCP/IP network and its integration with radio repeaters, in order to build something like “hybrid” radio links. The example proposed in the article is based on Raspberry Pi that is, by now, the preferred platform for our tutorials on GNU/Linux embedded world. In this first issue we are depicting how to build a portable internet “radio”, it is a device suitable for receiving and managing radio and audio streaming carried by an internet connection, both wired and wireless. We will also cover the management of audio track playlists stored on USB keys or on network shared disk drives. Streaming trasmission requires sending a flows of TCP/HTTP packets containing bunches of digitazed audio from production and distribution servers to clients scattered all over internet networks, where the streaming itself will be turned again into audible sounds.

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Linux 3.16 Shows Some Slower Numbers On Intel Devil's Canyon

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Linux

Yesterday I published some performance benchmarks indicating Intel ultrabook performance might be a bit slower on Linux 3.16 when comparing a recent Git kernel against Linux 3.15 stable. Today I have some results from a very different system: numbers on the very high-end Intel Core i7 4790K "Devil's Canyon" desktop rig.

With doing the comparison again of Linux 3.15 stable against Linux 3.16 Git, in a number of tests the performance was measurably slower with the newer code still under development. In a majority of the tests the performance was about the same, but in none of the cases was there any significant performance gains for this system.

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uCLinux SBC for IoT runs WiFi and Bluetooth at 400mW

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Linux

Amptek is prepping a uClinux- and Cortex-M3 based “iCon” SBC for IoT, equipped with WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, USB, and CAN, and running on under half a Watt.

uClinux on a microcontroller represents the simplest expression of the Linux operating system, sort of the flipside to Android or Ubuntu on the high end. Despite this platform’s limitations, however, it draws only a smidgin of electricity, and provides a capable wireless platform while also supplying numerous industrial interfaces. All these attributes are showcased by the iCon single board computer (SBC), which probably deserves more than being stuck in the doldrums on Kickstarter, with nine days left to go.

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Alpine Linux 3.0.1 Is a Linux OS for People Who Love the Terminal

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OS
Linux

Alpine Linux is not a distribution designed for beginners. In fact, it’s exactly the opposite. Users will need to be well accustomed to use a terminal. For example, you have to work a little just to install a desktop environment.

“The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.0.1 of its Alpine Linux operating system. This is a bugfix release of the v3.0 musl based branch. This release is based on the 3.14.8 kernel which has some critical security fixes,” said the developers in the shortlog.

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Raspberry Pi NOOBS 1.3.8: Get it, try it, and have fun

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Development
Linux

OpenELEC has been updated to 4.0.5 in this NOOBS release. In addition to the XBMC update (which is undoubtedly the most important change), there are lots of security fixes and general bugfixes — some of which were specific to the Raspberry Pi version, so this is particularly good news for RPi users. It also includes support for some more WLAN chips, updated Raspberry Pi firmware, and it even updates the Linux kernel to 3.14.7, which is even newer than what is included in the Raspbian distribution. Good stuff.

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MIT scientists create 36-core chip speed demon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Right now the only operating system that supports this 36 core processors, are the ones based on Linux, though it is not certain which Linux based OS MIT researchers are using.

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What's Next For Fedora?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Interviews

Between the upcoming Fedora 21 release, involvement in Red Hat's Project Atomic, its planned re-structuring under Fedora.next, and its new leader, Matthew Miller, the Fedora Project has a lot going on lately. All of the upheaval is a sign that the distribution is doing what it must to stay relevant in the new world of distributed, scale-out computing, says Miller who took over as project leader earlier this month after his predecessor Robyn Bergeron announced her departure in May.

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Why Raspberry Pi is still the white knight of education

Filed under
Development
Linux
Interviews

Two years ago, when the Raspberry Pi launched, it was with the intention of improving IT education in the UK. Since then more powerful, better connected or cheaper boards have come onto the market, but the Pi retains its position as the white knight of ICT teaching.

Why? Because of the community of users that has grown up around it. To find out more we travelled west to Manchester, venue for the second annual Jamboree—a festival of educators, makers and messer-abouters focussed on highlighting how engaging the Pi can be. There, we met 75% of the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s education team—Ben Nuttall, Clive Beale, and Carrie Anne Philbin—to discuss IT teaching in the UK.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0r1 Is an Interesting Debian and GNOME 3.10 Mix

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0r1, a live and installation DVD based on Debian, aiming to provide a ready-to-use, easy-to-install desktop and laptop-optimized operating system, has been released for testing.

The developers' ultimate goal is to offer customers an easy-to-use OS based on Debian's Wheezy branch, which employs a release of the GNOME desktop environment. The devs have made a few minor modifications to the desktop and now it's much easier to set it apart from other distros.

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The big takeaway from Google I/O: Linux everywhere

Filed under
Linux
Google

I was wondering what was ‘L’ in Android, until someone pointed out “maybe it’s Linux”. In all honestly I don’t think it’s L for Linux, but a wishful thinking doesn’t hurt given the fact that Google is putting Linux ‘everywhere’.

Linus Torvalds may have never dreamt of this day when he sent out that email back in 1991 and said, “I’m doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones.”

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Also:

  • Linux is Everywhere - Supercomputers to Mobile Phones

    Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, writing for ZDNet, once again reminds us that Linux dominates supercomputers. SJVN linked to the latest Top500 group results, showing Linux makes up for 97% of the five hundred fastest computers in the world. This is the biggest of the big iron, the top supercomputer has 1,024,000 GB of RAM and 3,120,000 Intel Xeon cores, running Kylin Linux.

    With Linux being the clear OS of choice among the hot rod builders, where does proprietary Unix fit into the picture? Increasingly, the answer appears to be that it doesn't.

  • Linux Nears Total Domination of the Top500 Supercomputers

    Not only does Linux power all of the top 10 machines on the June 2014 list -- including China's winning Tianhe-2, which stole the show once again with its performance of 33.86 Petaflop/second (Pflop/s) on the Linpack benchmark -- but it also now accounts for a full 97 percent of the full set of 500. A mere 15 supercomputers on the list *don't* use Linux, including 12 using Unix and just two using Windows. (The last one is described simply as "Mixed.")

  • Google I/O Offers Devs Big Bonanza

    Google on Wednesday kicked off its I/O conference in San Francisco, presenting devs with a dizzying array of possibilities: a new design language for Android L; a boatload of new apps, APIs and SDKs; and expanded support for a variety of architectural and hardware configurations. "If I were a developer, I would feel real good about opportunities today," said ABI analyst Jeff Orr.

  • Google debuts Android L (5.0), plus wearable, auto, TV versions

    At Google I/O, Google previewed Android 5.0′s new UI, and also unveiled Android TV and Android Auto, while offering new details on Android Wear.

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    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
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    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.

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