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New Sandboxing Features Come To Systemd

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Lennart Poettering has added two new service sandboxing features to systemd.

For improving the security of Linux services, Lennart added ReadOnlySystem and ProtectedHome settings for services. ReadOnlySystem will mount /usr and /boot as read-only for the specific service. The ProtectedHome setting mounts /home and /run/user as read-only or replaces it with an empty, inaccessible directory.

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Linux 3.16: New Synaptics Driver, Improved Sony DualShock 4 Driver

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Linux

The HID/input pull request for the Linux 3.16 merge window has been sent in with some useful additions.

First up for the HID Linux 3.16 pull is an RMI driver, which is for supporting Synaptics RMI4 devices over USB or I2C. The RMI driver right now uses its own RMI4 implementation but will ultimately become a transport driver for the RMI4 library once it's been merged upstream. This driver was developed by Synaptics along with Red Hat and other independent kernel contributors.

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Nouveau On Linux 3.16 Will Allow You To Try Re-Clocking

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The Nouveau DRM graphics driver for open-source NVIDIA support hasn't seen any fundamental re-clocking support breakthroughs for the upcoming Linux 3.16 kernel but the support can be easily enabled for select GeForce GPU models.

The lucky GPUs where the Nouveau end-user re-clocking can be enabled with the next kernel update is the NV40, NVAA, and NVE0 GPU series. The NV40 chip family is the GeForce 6 and 7 series. The NVAA series meanwhile is part of the NV50 family but consists of just the GeForce 8100/8200/8300 mobile GPUs / nForce 700a series and 8200M G. NVE0 meanwhile is the most interesting of the bunch and consists of the Kepler (GeForce 600/700 series) GPUs. Re-clocking support for other graphics processor generations is still a work-in-progress.

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Pi-based private cloud storage device runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

A $149 “Sherlybox” NAS debuted on Kickstarter today, based on a Raspberry Pi core, and offering a secure VPN that creates an invite-only cloud service.

After Polish startup called “Sher.ly” developed a VPN and file-sharing software product of the same name, the developers felt it needed a little kick with the help of a Kickstarter-funded hardware device called “Sherlybox.” The device is somewhat similar to another Linux-based Kickstarter project called Lima, which has yet to enter commercial pre-sales more than 10 months after being funded. While the Lima was built from scratch, the current Sherlybox prototype is based on a Raspberry Pi Model B single-board computer.

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Not just for phones: Samsung shows Tizen-powered TV, cameras

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Linux

The Korean electronics company, which earlier this week unveiled a new smartphone running the open-source operating system, on Tuesday showed off Tizen-based TVs, cameras, and wearables -- some of these devices for the first time. The gadgets, displayed at the Tizen Developer Conference in San Francisco, all are part of Samsung's efforts to create a broad ecosystem for Tizen, its alternative to Android.

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Also: Samsung Z Tizen OS smartphone and Samsung Tizen OS TV SDK

SparkyLinux 3.4 LXDE, e18 & Razor-Qt is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux

SparkyLinux 3.4 “Annagerman” LXDE, Razor-Qt and Enlightenment 18 is out.

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Scheduler Changes Queued For Linux 3.16

Filed under
Linux

Among other pull requests in the past day like the new staging work and the plethora of ARM enhancements, Ingo Molnar sent in his scheduler changes for the Linux 3.16 kernel.

Of the highlights for the scheduler tree with the Linux 3.16 merge window are NUMA scheduling updates for better performance, CPU idle changes to improve the high level idle scheduling logic, standardized idle polling across architectures, and continued work on preparing better power/energy-aware scheduling. Another change to point out is for using the deepest C-state always when in the "freeze" sleep state.

The power-aware scheduling for the Linux kernel has been something that's been in the works for many months and is nearing fruition.

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North Korea Linux 3.0 released

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Linux

I did a full review of an earlier version of North Korea Linux on Desktop Linux Reviews a while back. There are some interesting and scary videos in the review of what life is like inside of North Korea. I'll certainly take a pass on running North Korea Linux as my primary distro, but I'm sure it will appeal to somebody out there.

You might want to also check out the Reddit thread about version 3.0 of North Korea Linux to see some of the reactions from Linux users about this oddball distro. While I doubt there will be many converts to it, it certainly generated a lot of buzz.

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Linux Mint 17 With Cinnamon Desktop Keeps Focus on Ease of Use

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Linux Mint is among the most popular Linux desktop distributions in use today, thanks in large part to its core focus on improving the desktop experience for users. It's a focus that has been in place for Linux Mint since day one. When Clement Lefebvre developed Linux Mint in 2006, he did so with the goal of creating a user-friendly desktop version of Linux. Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu Linux, adding new desktop, setting and configuration elements. The latest version of Linux Mint, version 17 (code-named Qiana), is based on the recent Ubuntu 14.04 "Trusty Tahr" release, which is what is known as a Long Term Support (LTS) release. Lefebvre has pledged that Linux Mint 17 will also be an LTS release and will continue to receive security updates for five years, until 2019. Lefebvre has also pledged that until 2016, the core package base will remain the same, which is intended to make it easier for users to upgrade to new versions of Linux Mint. As is the case with other Linux distributions, there are multiple desktop user interfaces that are available to users. With Linux Mint, however, there is a particular focus on the Cinnamon desktop, which was created by the Linux Mint distribution itself. In this slide show, eWEEK examines some of the key features of the Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon release.

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Intel Brings QuickAssist Support To Linux: Crypto & Compression

Filed under
Linux
Software

Intel has published a new Linux kernel patch-set that adds Quick Assist Technology support to Linux along with a driver to handle their DH895xxC hardware accelerator. This is a new chip for trying to accelerate cryptography and data compression tasks.

Quick Assist Technology is a new Intel technology for better accelerating cryptography and data compression operations. The Linux implementation consists of a kernel driver to connect to the Linux kernel crypto framework and a Linux user-space library with a QuickAssist API for application porting. Intel Linux developers have already patched OpenSSL's libcrypto and Zlib for taking advantage of this Intel technology.

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BlueBorne Vulnerability Is Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases, Update Now

Canonical released today new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases, patching recently discovered security vulnerabilities, including the infamous BlueBorne that exposes billions of Bluetooth devices. The BlueBorne vulnerability (CVE-2017-1000251) appears to affect all supported Ubuntu versions, including Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) up to 16.04.3, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) up to 14.04.5, and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) up to 12.04.5. Read more

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS