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The Steam Controller Works "Out Of The Box" On Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Valve's initial Steam Controller prototype for use with the Steam Machines Linux-based game console will also work "out of the box" on other Linux distributions.

I had written earlier about Former NVIDIA, Microsoft Developers Doing Lots Of The SteamOS Work. In that earlier article I mentioned I didn't see any Steam Controller Linux driver present in Valve's Debian-based SteamOS. It turns out that the Steam Controller for now will work just fine with the generic USB HID input driver.

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Slideshow: 10 Linux-Based Robots by Land, Air, And Sea

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Linux

In the year since we ran our last Linux robot slideshow, the field has expanded considerably. In addition to major new Linux-based commercial products like Lego's Mindstorms EV3 educational robot kit, there are dozens of open spec kit designs available, many of them from small hobbyist groups. A number of these integrate Rasbperry Pi or BeagleBone single board computers, often in conjunction with Arduino motor controllers.

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MintBox 2 review: Linux Mint in a compact, powerful computer

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Linux

Operating system: Linux Mint
Processor: Intel i5-3337U
Memory: 4GB DDR3
Heat dissipation: Die-cast heatsink case, fanless design
Networking: 2 x Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 N Wireless
Ports: 6 x USB 2.0, 2 x USB 3.0, optical in and out, 2 x eSATA, HDMI out, Display Port out

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SteamOS 1.0 is Here, Based on Debian 7.1

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Linux
Gaming

SteamOS 1.0 was made available for download today through Valve-owned steampowered.com. In the SteamOS FAQ, we discover that SteamOS 1.0 is based on Debian 7.1 stable. Some of the changes for Steam include backporting eglibc 2.17 from Debian testing, updating the kernel to 3.10.11, and auto-updates from the Valve SteamOS repos. Valve chose Debian because they felt it "is the best way for Valve to deliver a fully custom SteamOS experience" to its customers.

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Android's ION Proposed For Mainline Linux

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Linux

John Stultz is attempting to bring the Android ION constraint memory allocator into the Linux kernel's staging area. ION is used by Google's Android mobile operating system for allocating memory that can be shared between multiple devices and that potentially have differing memory access constraints.

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Samsung merges camera and mobile divisions in a bid to differentiate its smartphones

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Linux
Hardware

The impact of this reorganization isn't yet clear, and might not be felt for a while to come, but it does reiterate Samsung's interest in hybrid devices like the Galaxy S4 Zoom. Bringing the camera and phone designers closer together should also result in tighter collaboration between their teams. Samsung promises to improve the "operation capabilities" of the newly reassigned imaging team and "promote its market leadership."

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Epiphany 3.10.3 Brings Greater Web Compatibility

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Linux

The GNOME development team was happy to announce a couple of days ago, on December 11, that the third maintenance release of the stable Epiphany 3.10 web browser is now available for download and users are urged to update as soon as the package becomes available in their Linux operating systems.

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The latest on GNOME Software from Fedora Rawhide

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Linux

GNOME Software is the built-in software management application on GNOME 3. It is a beautiful application.

In the future, it might be all you need to install and manage applications on a GNOME 3 desktop. For now, it is a work in progress. Usable, but definitely not feature-complete.

The distribution to use if you want to see how far it’s coming along is Fedora. And the best version of Fedora to download and install is Fedora Rawhide, the developmental version. Which is exactly what I did yesterday. Downloaded and installed it in a virtual environment.

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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 Beta 1 Looks Great, Performance Is Great

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Linux

Red Hat this week released the first beta to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. RHEL 7 is based upon improvements and other work that happened over the past few release cycles in Fedora (Red Hat says it's Fedora 19-based but in developer comments it turns out to be a mix of 18/19/20) and is riding on its new enterprise Linux 3.10 kernel. In this article is a first look at RHEL 7 Beta 1 along with our first benchmarks of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 comparing the results to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5.

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The first "Steam Machine" has been revealed

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Linux
Gaming

Following the announcement of "Steam Machines" from Valve to "conquer" the living room, the first "Steam Machine" has been revealed recently. The American company iBuyPower has revealed its own vision of a Steam box to compete with the recently released game consoles from Microsoft and Sony.

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Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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