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10 important Open Source distribution criteria

Filed under
Linux
OSS

ghabuntu.com: Open source doesn't just mean access to the source code. The distribution terms of open-source software must comply with the following criteria:

Is Linux too hard?

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Linux

news.cnet.com: Despite booming enterprise server sales, some in the industry continue to grumble that Linux is too hard. Designed by geeks for geeks, the theory goes, Linux will never be mainstream.

Disk-O-Tech: Linux Disk Management

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
HowTos

linux-mag.com: You might have worked with Linux for years and never added an additional disk to your system or perhaps you were too frustrated by Linux’s strange ways of dealing with disks to attempt it. In either case, here’s your opportunity to work through the steps required in adding a new disk to your system.

Red Hat launches opensource.com with Drupal

Filed under
Linux
Drupal
Web

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat has just launched a new portal at opensource.com - for information and articles about open source. The site uses the Drupal open source content management system and it looks like Red Hat has been working on the site since at least October.

Why There is no Kernel Hacker Sell-Out

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: One of the talks at LCA2010 gave the fact that "75% of the code comes from people paid to do it.” In my view, this 75% figure indicates two things.

Amazing Wallpaper - Evolution Of Ubuntu 9.10

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Linux

Amazing Wallpaper - Evolution Of Ubuntu 9.10

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 338

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Hymera and commercial Linux
  • News: Booting Ubuntu in 15 seconds, Lubuntu update, Slackware articles round-up, insecurity of OpenBSD, Qimo 4 Kids 2.0
  • Questions and answers: Linux on Apple hardware
  • Released last week: Tiny Core Linux 2.8, Càtix 1.6
  • New additions: DigAnTel, Element
  • New distributions: Alpine Linux, Gosalia, LFU, MCL, simpleLinux, stali, ÜberStudent, Ubuntu Electronics Remix
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux market share grows vs. Windows and Mac OS X shrinkage

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

blogs.computerworld: We're told Linux is the only OS with a growing market share: Windows and Mac OS X actually shrank. The Net Applications report also shows Windows 7 already dwarfing all versions of Mac OS combined.

Fedora, Debian, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, OpenSolaris Benchmarks

Filed under
OS
Linux
BSD

phoronix.com: Last week we published the first Debian GNU/kFreeBSD benchmarks. We have now extended that comparison to put many other operating systems in a direct performance comparison to these Debian GNU/Linux and Debian GNU/kFreeBSD snapshots of 6.0 Squeeze to Fedora 12, FreeBSD 7.2, FreeBSD 8.0, OpenBSD 4.6, and OpenSolaris 2009.06.

NZ school ditches Microsoft and goes totally open source

Filed under
Linux

cio.com.au: A New Zealand high school running entirely on open source software has slashed its server requirements by a factor of almost 50, despite a government deal mandating the use of Microsoft software in all schools.

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Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false. Read more Also: Anti-Systemd People