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Total chooses Linux for its supercomputer

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GNU
Linux

French oil firm Total has revealed that its supercomputer is now running on a Linux Enterprise Server operating system.

The oil giant chose the Linux Enterprise Server - provided by software company SUSE - as it was the best value for money, according to the Total's high power computer (HPC) engineer, Diego Klahr.

The IT deployment comes as Total looks to bolster its oil production process. In 2013, with oil and gas reserves diminishing, the Exploration and Production (Total E&P) department needed to improve how it located new oil and gas reserves.

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How a Linux system administrator evolves from beginner to advanced professional

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Linux
Gaming

In today's open source roundup: Each stage of the evolution of a Linux system adminstrator. Plus: The different types of Linux users based on their preferred distribution, and Borderlands 2 coming to Linux

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5 things you need to know about the Raspberry Pi’s Epiphany web browser

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Linux
Web

Epiphany is a new web browser for the Raspberry Pi. It’s been modified to be faster, smoother and more powerful than the previous web browser, Midori, meaning it possible to watch 720p YouTube videos and browse more Javascript-heavy websites like RaspberryPi.org and RasPi.Today.

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Google Chrome 38 Beta Update Improved KDE Wallet Compatibility

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Google

The Beta branch of the Google Chrome browser, the Internet browser developed by Google, has been updated yet again and the developers have made a series of changes and improvements.

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Linux Desktop Fragmentation Is a Feature, Not a Bug

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Linux

One of the most common expressions that you will hear in the Linux community is platform fragmentation, and it's also one of the contra arguments that people spout when citing reasons not to get a Linux OS. I'm here to tell you why platform fragmentation is actually a good thing.

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Samsung's Tizen-Based Gear S Throws a Curve at Smartwatch Market

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Linux

Prior to this week's IFA show in Berlin, Samsung showed off its third Tizen Linux-based smartwatch. The Gear S offers several innovations compared to the Tizen-based Gear 2 and Gear Neo smartwatches, including autonomous operation and a curved screen. The Gear S will ship in Korea in October, followed by a global launch. According to this mostly favorable CNET Gear S hands-on, there are no current plans for a U.S. launch.

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Can this free software company secure the future of Linux for the city of Munich?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are many solved problems in open source. Groupware is not one of them.

How else would you explain the number of migrations that fail on average in groupware? The Swiss canton of Solothurn is just one example among many as a result of groupware vendors who have given up and transitioned to Outlook or the web to meet their needs. Kolab does things differently. For one, Outlook will never be the client for the Linux desktop. And, the web is a good answer for a lot of things, but not all.

The city of Munich is another good case to look at; they successfully completed a Linux migration that has saved them millions of Euros. But now, the newly elected mayor and his deputy have made the news by publicly considering a migration back to Windows. To explore this further, let's first ignore for a moment that the City Council would need to approve any change in strategy and has renewed its dedication to LiMux. Let's also ignore the fact that the City employees do not consider it a good idea to go back to Windows.

So, what was it that prompted LiMux to be put into question in the news?

If you guessed that Office interoperatbility may have something to do with it, you would be right. As long as there are competing standards there will be incompatibility between the dominant vendor and the rest of the market. Document exchange remains a constant issue that is ultimately only solved at the political level. This particular problem is not technical and the UK has recently demonstrated that they will choose open documents as the standard format to deal with it.

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Valve Finally Enables In-Home Streaming from Linux Hosts on Steam

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Valve released a new Beta version of the Steam distribution platform and the developers have implemented quite a few changes, including a very interesting one related to the In-Home streaming feature.

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Switch to Linux part 2 – install Linux

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Linux

Once you’ve got your Linux Mint image downloaded (or other distro if you fancy using a different one), you’ll need to burn it to a spare DVD or temporarily create a bootable USB stick with it. We recommend doing the latter by using the UNetbootin software and a spare USB stick that’s at least 2GB in size. Be sure to back up any files on the USB stick before using the software though, as it will delete them otherwise.

Once that’s all been dealt with, simply reboot your computer with the disc in the tray or USB stick still attached and look out for the ‘boot menu’ key when your computer first turns back on – this will probably be something like F12 or another function key.

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Backtrack 5 R3 Hits One Million Downloads on Softpedia

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GNU
Linux

Backtrack was a Linux distribution designed for digital forensics and penetration testing and it's no longer maintained. In fact, this OS was so successful that it's still being downloaded and used even today, despite the fact that it's no longer maintained.

Backtrack was not the only security-oriented distribution, but the wealth of applicationS provided by the developers ensured its supremacy. It remained one of the most downloaded Linux distributions for a long time, even after it wasn't maintained anymore.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.