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A Crock-Pot slow cooker with Wi-Fi smarts (hands-on)

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

The $130 Linux-based Crock-Pot WeMo Smart Slow Cooker was unveiled at CES earlier this year, and will be available in stores soon. I got to spend some time with one this week and thought I'd share some early impressions ahead of the full review. Belkin and Jarden Home Brands' app-controlled slow cooker struck me as an unlikely smart home contender at first. Slow cookers are about as low maintenance as possible, so how much value could WeMo integration add to something already so straightforward?

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The Staging Area Has Lots Of Changes In Linux 3.16

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Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman has sent out his various pull requests for the Linux 3.16 kernel. Of the subsystems maintained by Greg KH, the staging area again represents a bulk of the user-interesting changes.

Among the highlights for the kernel's staging area with Linux 3.16 are:

- 64-bit support for Android's Goldfish.

- Lots of work continues to go into the Comedi driver.

- Jes Sorensen has made over 500 changes to the rtl8723au for improving the Realtek WiFi support for many Linux laptop users. The rtl8723au driver was added in Linux 3.15 and supports many popular Lenovo laptops, among other hardware.

- Continued work on the Lustre client code.

- Many changes to the vt6656 driver for the VIA Solomon VT6566 802.11 a/b/g WiFi adapter.

- A new rtl8192ee driver for the Realtek RTL8192EE Wireless PCI-E controller.

- Many other changes to the numerous staging drivers.

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Build your own distro part one

Filed under
GNU
Linux
HowTos

There a few reasons why you might want to build your own distribution. You might want to build a custom install CD to match the policy of your organisation. For example, a GNOME desktop with Chrome as the web browser might be the standard desktop where you work. That touches on another motivation for wanting to create a customised installer: sometimes the creator of the distribution makes a decision that you simply don’t like. Canonical’s decision to switch to its own UI, Unity, ranks amongst its most controversial decisions. However, by using some of the methods that we explore here, you could create a distribution that is standard Ubuntu, but with a traditional desktop that you are more comfortable with.

There are other, niche reasons for wanting to build your own distribution. You might need to put something small and lightweight together for an older computer. You might need to build a live media ISO that you are able to carry around with you and to bring your favourite set of tools to bear when you need them.

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Samsung to Try Out Tizen Smartphone in Russia

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Samsung appears to be edging away from Google with the announcement of a new smartphone that runs on the Tizen OS rather than on Android. The System Z has a long and difficult path ahead if its developers want to set it up as an independent smartphone system.

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Free online courses abound to help you bone up on Linux, SDN and more

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Massive open online courses offer IT professionals the opportunity to learn about some of the tech industry's most in-demand and current topics for free. Available to anyone with a Web connection, MOOCs cover a range of hot tech topics including software defined networking, cloud computing, security, drone development, artificial intelligence and mobile programming.

Popular MOOC platforms include edX, a venture developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, and Coursera, which was founded by two Stanford University professors. Course material mostly comes from academic institutions that adapt the material taught in classrooms for online learning. Cornell University, the University of California Berkeley and Caltech are just some of the schools that have made content available on MOOC platforms.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Cumulus Networks

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux has already transformed data center economics on the server side, and Cumulus Networks is set to do it again – this time through the network. The company behind Cumulus Linux, the first distribution for data center switches and other networking hardware, is part of a broader enterprise movement toward open networking.

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Tango Studio 2.2 Update !

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Six months after the release of the first version, we are pleased to announce the updated of ISOs Tango Studio to version 2.2. This new version has been updated to Wheezy 7.5, contains some new features and bugfixes, as well as an update of the best open-source applications available for sound creation.

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IBM Opens Mainframe Linux and Cloud Center in Beijing

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Linux server demand is rising due to demand from cloud infrastructure deployments, according to IDC, and is expected to continue to grow in the future. In the first quarter of 2014, Linux server revenue accounted for 30 percent of overall server revenue, an increase of 15.4 percent, IDC said.[1] IBM has supported development of Linux on System z for more than a decade, and today there are over 3,000 certified applications for Linux on System z. In addition, IBM is supporting the development of skills to take advantage of these applications through the IBM Academic Initiative.

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WebOS is back in one million living rooms

Filed under
OS
Linux

LG is today congratulating itself on selling one million of its webOS smart TVs. After announcing the new Smart+ TVs at CES in January, the Korean manufacturer released a range of models in March, and took just under four months to hit today's milestone. It's now predicting it will sell 10 million by "the first half of 2015."

"Rather than continuing to add more and more functions into our smart TVs that few people will ever use," says LG's head of TV In-kyu Lee, "we've decided to focus on simplicity ... consumers seem to share our view that this is the right direction for the evolution of smart TVs going forward." The new models are still in the process of being rolled out globally, and LG says webOS TVs will be in over 150 markets by the end of June. It's also planning to bring more "LG Smart+ TV Experience Zones" to retail outlets in order to better promote the range.

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Tegra K1, Samsung Multi-Platform, Other ARM'ing For Linux 3.16

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Olof Johansson sent in a bulk of the new ARM work on Monday that's targeting Linux 3.16. Among the highlights of this Linux ARM work include:

- Samsung Exynos SoCs now supports being built as part of a multi-platform kernel where one Linux kernel image is now able to support running on different SoCs. The ARM platforms now supporting this multi-platform kernel mode is Samsung Exynos, NVIDIA Tegra, Freescale i.MX, Texas Instruments OMAP, and many other ARMv7 platforms.

- As some recent Exynos improvements were held up until Samsung developers worked out their multi-platform support, there's also a lot of other Samsung specific enhancements for this next kernel around their 3250 and
5410/5420/5800 series hardware.

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Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.