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openSUSE 12.2 Milestone 1

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Linux
  • openSUSE 12.2 Milestone 1
  • PCLinuxOS Phoenix Edition 2012-02 Maintenance Release
  • Debian Project formally sets software patent policies

Sabayon 8 XFCE Review

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Linux
  • Sabayon 8 XFCE Review
  • Linux Mint 12: Why it's the best desktop OS
  • Chakra GNU/Linux 2012.02 Archimedes review
  • PC Linux OS 2012.02: nice and stable

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 444

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Asturix 4 and On desktop
  • News: Debian's position on software patents, Fedora 17 alpha testing, overview of Cinnamon, FreeBSD package management with pkgng
  • Questions and answers: End of support for Kubuntu
  • Released last week: Scientific Linux 6.2, Tiny Core Linux 4.3

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Is Windows 8 a Linux Copycat?

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Linux
Microsoft

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): Here in the world of technology, there's no denying that developers of even the most creative new products and ideas "stand on the shoulders of giants," just as innovators in most other realms do too.

Debian Project News - February 20th

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Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's fourth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Goodbye Lenny!, Debian GNU/Hurd on the rails, and GPL in Debian: a study.

Where in the world is Tux?

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Linux
  • Where in the world is Tux? Photos from 29 countries
  • Linux Live Environments: Cool Tools Even For Windows Folks
  • 2012 Linux Job Forecast: Demand is on the Rise
  • Code in next Debian release valued at $A17 billion
  • Linus Likes Linux License
  • Random thoughts about Linux and my job

Scientific Linux 6.2 released

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Linux
  • Scientific Linux 6.2 released
  • Sabayon Succumbs to Cinnamon's Irresistible Allure
  • Debian announces "Wheezy" artwork contest
  • Pear Linux Comice OS 4 beta 1 review
  • Linux Mint 12 Lisa KDE - I don't know what to think
  • DelLinuxOS – An openSUSE based Linux spin
  • Distro Hoppin`: Linux Mint 12 KDE
  • Sick of Ubuntu? Take a look at Linux Mint 12
  • Comparison Test: Linux Mint 12 "Lisa" KDE vs. Netrunner 4.1 "Dryland"
  • Chating with Red Hat's John Mark Walker
  • openSUSE Travel Support Program
  • Today’s Featured Distribution – Salix OS
  • CrunchBang 10 update split into two editions
  • 10 Pentesting Linux Distributions You Should Try

Ubuntu and Slackware Named Top Desktop Linux Distros

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Linux

pcworld.com: The world of desktop Linux is often portrayed these days as a battle primarily between longstanding leader Ubuntu and up-and-coming challenger Linux Mint, frequently with the suggestion that Mint is winning.

The death of the Linux distro

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Linux

zdnet.com: The Linux distro is dying, but that’s not a bad thing. Instead of thinking in distros, the platform (or the environment) is rapidly becoming the differentiator when it comes to different flavors of the free OS, and this will give Linux the much-deserved boost it deserves.

Why The Linux Desktop Matters More Than Ever, This Time?

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Linux

lxer.com: If we look back at failures of Linux on Desktops till today and analyze the technical part, it was due to hardware support and the software quality (GUI) that general computer users could use.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Linux has been in the ascendancy ever since the open source operating system was released, and has been improved and refined over time so that a typical distribution is now a polished and complete package comprising virtually everything the user needs, whether for a server or personal system. Much of the web runs on Linux, and a great many smartphones, and numerous other systems, from the Raspberry Pi to the most powerful supercomputers. So is it time to switch from Windows to Linux? Here are five reasons why. Read more

today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud