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Linux

My Arch Linux Experiment (Part 1)

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Linux

itnewstoday.com: I decided to review Arch Linux and give it a score just as I do everything else. However, Arch Linux isn’t like most distributions. The mission is simple. I decided to see if I can duplicate my existing Kubuntu set up into Arch Linux.

Fedora, good and bad

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Linux

flameeyes.eu: In the past few days, since I’ve been spending time at my sister’s house, I’ve used as single system the laptop I bought a few months ago, with runs Fedora 11.

Linux market share drops as Win 7 launch looms

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Linux

tgdaily.com: OS and browser stats have just been published for August, showing that Windows 7 continues to grow its market share even though it still hasn't been launched.

Linux Gazette September 2009 (#166):

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Linux

Linux Gazette September 2009 (#166) is out. Highlights include: Away Mission: VMware World, Digital ID World and Intel Developer Forum; Using Linux to Teach Kids How to Program, 10 Years Later (Part I); and Internet Radio Router.

Red Hat Aims RHEL 5.4 At The Cloud

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Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: New operating system release and hypervisor development work put the open source vendor on a collision course with VMware and Microsoft

Vixta Linux 2009.7

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Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: A lot of Windows users have considered switching to Linux and usually when they do switch it means getting used to a whole new look and feel on their desktop computers. But what happens when Linux is made to look like Windows? Is that a good thing or a bad thing?

Why Linux does not look like Windows

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Linux

tech-no-media.com: One interesting remark I read in some comments is that Linux distributions are not successful because they don't look enough like Windows. Apparently if someone completely copied the interface of Windows and slapped that on top of Linux, Windows users would migrate in droves.

Comparing windows and Linux hardware management.

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Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: An operating systems most basic function is to act as a layer between the computer hardware and the user space programs. What an operating system provides to those user space programs is a standard interface to the computers hardware, no matter what type of hardware that is.

The 'Linuxification' of Windows has begun

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Linux
Software

Randall C. Kennedy, InfoWorld: It's like a cancer: a creeping, deadly disease that slowly erodes all that's good and clean, replacing it with a swill of malignancy and decrepitude. I'm speaking, of course, of the recent appearance of Linux UI conventions under Windows.

Fedora from an Ubuntu point of view

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Linux

blog.lynxworks.eu: In the interests of not becoming blinkered to one distribution, I thought I might give Fedora 11 a whirl. Not having used Fedora since FC4, I was surprised to see the adoption of a live CD installation and relieved to avoid a DVD size download. Just like Ubuntu it’s well polished, perhaps more so with graphical grub.

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Citizens call on Dortmund to use free software

Four citizens of the German city of Dortmund have started a citizens’ initiative, asking the city council to seriously consider the use of free and open source software. “The city needs to recognise free software as a topic in the public interest”, the DO-FOSS initiators write. Read more

NVIDIA Tegra DRM Driver Supports Atomic Mode-Setting In Linux 3.20

The latest work landing in the DRM-Next code-base for the Linux 3.20 kernel merge window is the Tegra DRM driver updates. The Tegra DRM driver is primarily designed to support the Tegra 4 and older SoCs while the Tegra K1 and newer is supported by the Nouveau DRM driver due to the graphics core now being common with their mainline desktop architecture. The Tegra K1's GK20A graphics core is derived directly from Kepler while the brand new Tegra X1 is derived from Maxwell. Regardless, the Tegra DRM driver continues to be actively developed by NVIDIA stakeholders. Read more

LibreOffice 4.4 the beautiful

We are very close to release LibreOffice 4.4 and I thought I’d share my thoughts on the work that has been put into this new branch and what the general idea is about it. LibreOffice 4.4 is unusual; as a major release you may expect some important underlying change in its architecture, or the inclusion of a set of major features. The 4.4 does include several important features and improvements, most notably for Impress and the much forgotten HTML editor (the comprehensive release notes may be found here). But the most important details are not to be found in this area. If you want to understand where the 4.4 branch is headed, I think it is useful to keep two fundamental trends in mind. Read more

Embedded Linux Conference hijacked by drones

The Embedded Linux Conference + Android Builders Summit on Mar. 23-25 in San Jose is about “Drones, Things, and Automobiles,” but drones get the most love. Maybe it’s just our imagination, but the Linux Foundation’s Embedded Linux Conference seems to be getting more interesting than ever. The program increasingly reflects new opportunities for Linux in areas such as drones, robots, automotive computers, IoT gizmos, 3D sensing, modular phones, and much more. For those of you worried that ELC North America is skimping on the basics as it explores the more colorful sides of Linux, rest your mind at ease. There are still plenty of sessions on booting, trace analysis, NAND support, PHY frameworks, power management, defragmenting, systemd, device tree, and toolchain. Geeks still rule! Read more