Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Running mission-critical applications on Enterprise Linux servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

At the core of any organisation are important IT systems that are vital for continued successful operation. Mission-critical applications, such as ERP, CRM, business intelligence, data warehousing, and analytics, advance and support business in many fundamental ways. In the modern, global corporate landscape, it is almost certain that users will need to access these systems at any time of day, demanding around-the-clock, 24/7 availability. Any outage of mission-critical server infrastructure directly impacts revenue and profitability, so downtime must be avoided.

Read more

Linux Container Adoption Set to Grow Rapidly

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

The Linux Foundation today released its 2014 end user trends report, providing visibility into how some of the world's largest IT organizations are thinking about and using Linux.

Read more

Configurable Menu: Install the best menu for Linux Mint 17/17.1 Cinnamon

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Configurable Menu is one of the best applet’s I’ve found in Linux Mint Cinnamon. I’ve been using it for about three weeks on Linux Mint 17 installed on my laptop. And I’ve just installed it on a test installation of Linux Mint 17.1 Cinnamon in VMware.

In this post, you’ll read why I like Configurable Menu so much and how you can install it on your Linux Mint 17/17.1 Cinnamon desktop.

So, why do I like Configurable Menu so much?

The answer, dear reader, lies in its name – configurable. Configurable Menu is very, very configurable. It can take on any form that you want – from a classic menu type to a fullscreen application launcher and any form in between.

Read more

First Stable Opera 26 for Linux Is Out, Features Best Possible HiDPI Support

Filed under
Linux

The stable version of the Opera browser has finally been released for the Linux platform and it looks like Google Chrome and Firefox will get some serious competition.

Behind the App: The Story of Kali Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It began out of necessity for lead Kali developer Mati Aharoni (known as muts in the community). While doing professional security work he needed a variety of security tools without being able to install any software on his client's systems, and so he took to Linux. We spoke with Mati to learn more about how it started and how the community-driven project has grown and evolved over the years into one of the leading security-focused Linux distributions.

Read more

Steam Hardware Survey Shows More Linux Users, but Not by Much

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

The Steam for Linux client has a pretty strong base that doesn't seem to change an awful lot and the latest numbers from the Steam Hardware Survey for November indicate just that.

Read more

AMDKFD Is Present For Linux 3.19 In Open-Source HSA Start

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The AMDKFD driver, which has been under development in the public spotlight for the past few months as a necessary piece to having AMD HSA open-source support on Linux, will premiere with the Linux 3.19 kernel.

Read more

Linux Foundation finds enterprise Linux growing at Windows' expense

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

This report is based on data from an invitation-only survey of The Linux Foundation's Enterprise End User Council as well as companies and organizations with sales of $500 million or more, or 500 or more employees. The surveyed group included Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Bristol-Myers Squibb, NTT, Deutsche Bank, DreamWorks, ADP, Bank of New York, NYSE, NASDAQ, Goodrich, MetLife, and AIG. Of course, these companies are already invested in Linux. That said, it's noteworthy how many Fortune 500 and financial powerhouses now put their trust in Linux for mission-critical software.

Read more

What is Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

You may not know this, but Linux is the most popular operating system in the world. It's at the heart of your Android smartphone or tablet, your smart thermostat, your television, and set top box. Linux runs on the world's most powerful supercomputers, and on the International Space Station. If you've used the Internet today to send an email, you used Linux. Linux powers the Internet. If you searched for cat pictures online, you used Linux. If you sent a letter, the old fashioned way, you probably used Linux as well. Linux runs on the large server farms that create those cool special effects in Hollywood. If you've been to see the latest superhero epic at the local theatre, and were totally blown away by the effects, you can thank Linux for part of that.

Linux is everywhere.

Read more

Linux Kernel 3.18 RC8 Is Out, Final Version to Arrive in a Week

Filed under
Linux

Linux Kernel 3.18 RC8 has been announced by Linus Torvalds and it looks like the development cycle is coming to an end, despite a problem that has been bugging the team for a couple of weeks.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

It Turns Out RISC-V Hardware So Far Isn't Entirely Open-Source

While they are trying to make it an open board, as it stands now Minnich just compares this RISC-V board as being no more open than an average ARM SoC and not as open as IBM POWER. Ron further commented that he is hoping for other RISC-V implementations from different vendors be more open. Read more

Perl 5.28.0 released

Version 5.28.0 of the Perl language has been released. "Perl 5.28.0 represents approximately 13 months of development since Perl 5.26.0 and contains approximately 730,000 lines of changes across 2,200 files from 77 authors". The full list of changes can be found over here; some highlights include Unicode 10.0 support, string- and number-specific bitwise operators, a change to more secure hash functions, and safer in-place editing. Read more

Today in Techrights

Will Microsoft’s Embrace Smother GitHub?

Microsoft has had an adversarial relationship with the open-source community. The company viewed the free Open Office software and the Linux operating system—which compete with Microsoft Office and Windows, respectively—as grave threats. In 2001 Windows chief Jim Allchin said: “Open source is an intellectual-property destroyer.” That same year CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer.” Microsoft attempted to use copyright law to crush open source in the courts. When these tactics failed, Microsoft decided if you can’t beat them, join them. It incorporated Linux and other open-source code into its servers in 2014. By 2016 Microsoft had more programmers contributing code to GitHub than any other company. The GitHub merger might reflect Microsoft’s “embrace, extend and extinguish” strategy for dominating its competitors. After all, GitHub hosts not only open-source software and Microsoft software but also the open-source projects of other companies, including Oracle, IBM, and Amazon Web Services. With GitHub, Microsoft could restrict a crucial platform for its rivals, mine data about competitors’ activities, target ads toward users, or restrict free services. Its control could lead to a sort of surveillance of innovative activity, giving it a unique, macro-scaled insight into software development. Read more