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Linux

Interesting facts about Linux

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Linux

There is a never-ending debate on whether or not Linux is an operating system. Technically, the term "Linux" refers to the kernel, a core component of an operating system. Folks who argue that Linux is not an operating system are operating system purists who think that the kernel alone does not make the whole operating system, or free software ideologists who believe that the largest free operating system should be named "GNU/Linux" to give credit where credit is due (i.e., GNU project). On the other hand, some developers and programmers have a view that Linux qualifies as an operating system in a sense that it implements the POSIX standard.

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Linux 3.17 Doesn't Boost Ivy Bridge Performance Numbers

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Linux

Last week I ran some performance tests that found Sandy Bridge was faster with the Linux 3.17 kernel and these performance gains with the still in-development kernel extended beyond just graphics. Curious, I ran some tests this weekend to see whether Intel Ivy Bridge processors were also running faster with Linux 3.17 compared to Linux 3.16 stable.

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Opening Up in New Ways: How the OpenPOWER Foundation is Taking Open to New Places

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Linux
Server

It’s no secret that open development is the key to rapid and continuous technology innovation. Openly sharing knowledge, skills and technical building blocks is something that we in the Linux community have long been promoting and have recognized as a successful model for breeding technology breakthroughs. Much of The Linux Foundation’s and its peerss efforts to date have been centered on fostering openness at the software level, starting right at the source -- the operating system – and building up from there. Traditionally, the agenda has not included a great amount of attention on how to open up at the hardware level. Until now.

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Tanglu 2.0 Alpha 1 (Bartholomea annulata) Is an Interesting OS Based on Debian

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Not too many people heard about the new Tanglu operating systems, although the developers are not at their first release. In fact, Tanglu 1.0 (Aequorea Victoria) was made available back in February, 2014. Now, the Tanglu devs have started to work on a second release and everything seems to be going as planned.

The system features a modern desktop and it's based on GNOME (not the default). It seems to be faster than the other distros with the same desktop, but this is still an Alpha release and many things can change in a few months’ time.

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Linux Turns 23 Years Old Today

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Linux

It was on this day in 1991 that Linus Torvalds first announced his new operating system that would go on to become Linux.

On 25 August 1991 is when Linus Torvalds in Helsinki announced his "free operating system" as a hobby that he had been developing since April. The initial release had GCC 1.40 and Bash 1.08 ported. The work wasn't originally known as Linux but originally was called Freax before being renamed to Linux. While most Phoronix readers have likely already seen that classic email many times, for those that haven't you can see the original posting to comp.os.minix. Happy birthday Linux!

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Don’t Fret Linus, Desktop Linux Will Slowly Gain Traction

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Linux

What? What challenge?
Of course there’s not a kernel problem. From where I sit, there’s not a GNU problem either. I’ve been using Mint with Xfce for a while now and I find it better than any version of Windows I’ve ever used, many times over. Other than needing a little polishing with some distros, there’s no problem whatsoever with the penguin. Desktop Linux is only the best there is.

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Spice Fire One now in India: A look at alternate mobile OSes beyond Android, iOS, WP8

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Linux
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Finally, Firefox smartphone now arrives in India. Though Mozilla’s Firefox OS as a smartphone operating system has had a negligible impact on the market, but all that could change very soon as the first Firefox smartphone has been announced for India. The Spice Fire One has predictable low-end specifications and a greatly attractive price tag of Rs 2,299.

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Start Talking About the GNU/Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux

Shortly, I will be going to a meeting where one participant has asked me for help with GNU/Linux on a notebook. She doesn’t like what M$ does for her there. I’ve made up a bootable USB-drive with the Debian installer and a repository of stuff the typical desktop user will need, including Synaptic and gksu so she can customize her notebook when she gets home. I will start her off with a basic installation of Debian GNU/Linux and add the XFCE4 desktop environment with a selection of a few typical applications: FireFox browser, VLC media player, GIMP image editor, and Ristretto image viewer. XFCE4 is similar to what she liked from M$: XP. If M$ won’t give her what she wants, I and the FLOSS community will. When random people you meet are interested in desktop GNU/Linux, this is no time to abandon this thriving technology. It works for ordinary people.

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Choose your side on the Linux divide

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Linux

The battle over systemd exposes a fundamental gap between the old Unix guard and a new guard of Linux developers and admins

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Linux Skills Gap: Where to Look for Linux Systems Management?

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GNU
Linux

The 2014 Linux Jobs report showed that the demand for Linux professionals is on the rise throughout Europe, with developers and system administrators most in demand. Such is the demand that 93% of hiring managers reported difficulty finding professionals with the Linux Systems Management skills they require. Of those unable to fill open positions, 25% have delayed projects as a result.

The “skills gap” reflects the rapid growth of Linux right across the business world. LinuxIT CIO Mike Curtis sees two groups of Linux professionals: the very highly skilled system administrators from corporate computing backgrounds; and then the less skilled employees of smaller organisations or public services who have trained on other operating systems. The second group have learned Linux in their own time and perhaps implemented some systems to handle specific functions for their employer. There is a huge skills gap between the two groups, and it’s not just technical.

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Android Leftovers

Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger. Read more

Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more