Linux

Kernel or distros

IFC6410 Pico-ITX Development Board Now Supports Fedora And Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Makers, hobbyists and developers looking for a new Linux Fedora or Ubuntu development board for their projects might be interested to learn that the IFC6410 Pico-ITX board which is available to purchase for around $149.

Read more

Rescatux 0.32 Beta 1 OS Can Help Users Fix Windows Systems and Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Rescatux can fix GRUB and GRUB2, check and fix filesystems (Windows MBR included), change GNU/Linux passwords, regenerate sudoers files, and much more.

Having a set of tools that can help you save your system from various problems is great, especially when those tools are packaged in a nice Debian-based Live distro. It may not look like much, but the point of this OS is not to look good, but to do a very specific job.

Read more

Control Your Phone with These Open Source Linux Apps

Filed under
Linux
OSS

If your phone can be connected to your computer with an USB cable you can do a lot more through this connection than just recharging it or transferring files to and from your phone's storage. For example, you can make phone calls, read and send text messages, and see a bunch of other information from your phone, right on your PC. There is a number of Free Open Source software applications that allow you to do this, and you don't even need to have a smartphone for this to work, just a phone that can connect to USB.

Read more

World’s most secure Android phone finally starts shipping next month

Filed under
Android
Linux
Security
  • World’s most secure Android phone finally starts shipping next month

    Secure communications specialist Silent Circle recently set out to build the most secure Android phone in the world, and some have gone as far as to call the company’s Blackphone an “NSA-proof” smartphone. That statement can’t be confirmed, of course, since the NSA surely still has a few tricks up its sleeve that we don’t know about. What we can say, however, is that people concerned with keeping their mobile communications private will soon have a new option that is more secure than any publicly available Android phone currently on the market.

  • Silent Circle's Blackphone will ship out in three weeks

    Silent Circle in partnership with Geeksphone announced the Blackphone in January this year. The makers of the Blackphone claims that the handset is the world's first smartphone that gives its user total control of privacy.

    The upcoming smartphone is powered by a modified version of Android, PrivatOS, which is believed to be more security-oriented. The Blackphone will be carrier and vendor independent, which will ensure that individuals and businesses are able to make and receive secure phone calls, send texts, store files, browse the internet and more without compromising the privacy of the user.

  • Blackphone is about to sidle stealthily into the mainstream
  • NSA-Proof? Super-Secure Blackphone Shipping by July
  • Super-Secure Blackphone Shipping by July
  • Anti-forensic mobile OS gets your phone to lie for you

    In Android Anti-forensics: Modifying CyanogenMod Karl-Johan Karlsson and William Bradley Glisson present a version of the Cyanogenmod alternate operating system for Android devices, modified so that it generates plausible false data to foil forensic analysis by law enforcement. The idea is to create a mobile phone that "lies" for you so that adversaries who coerce you into letting them take a copy of its data can't find out where you've been, who you've been talking to, or what you've been talking about.

Initial thoughts on Linux Mint 17

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Initial thoughts on Linux Mint 17

    As night follows the day, so too do Linux Mint launches follow Ubuntu releases. Linux Mint is a project which puts together a desktop-oriented distribution based on Ubuntu packages. The Linux Mint project tends to take a more practical and conservative approach to crafting a desktop operating system when compared to Ubuntu. While Ubuntu experiments with the Unity desktop, servers, cloud computing and mobile devices, the Mint team stays focused on producing a familiar, user-friendly, multimedia-enabled desktop solution. Starting with their most recent release, Linux Mint 17, the Mint team has announced they will be adjusting their release cycle, basing all Linux Mint releases on the most recent Ubuntu long term support release. This should make for a more stable platform and a more relaxed release cycle.

  • Download Linux Mint 17 Xfce and KDE release candidates

    In today's open source roundup: Linux Mint 17 Xfce and KDE RC released. Plus: Deepin 2014 RC released, and a review of Linux Mint 17 MATE by DistroWatch

Linux professionals use tweak tools to customize their OS, and so can you

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Where Windows has utilities, Linux has tweak tools. And whether you're a Linux pro or a recent refugee from Windows XP, they can help you makeA Ubuntu 14.04 LTS "Trusty Tahr" (the latest and greatest offering from Linux distro pioneer Canonical) really start to feel like home.

Customizability has long been one of Linux's most compelling features--particularly when compared with proprietary alternatives such as Windows and OS X--but the tweak tools out there today let you refine the OS even further. And if you're making the migration to Linux on your workplace PCs, tweak tools can help ease the transition.

Read more

Alienware say Steam Machine will increase Linux gamers by “20, 30 fold. Overnight”

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux gaming has seen massive growth in the past two years, ever since Valve began openly supporting the open source operating system. That growth is nothing compared to what it will be after the launch of their Steam Machines, says Alienware’s product manager, Marc Diana.

Read more

Seven Out of Ten Most Played Games on Steam Have Linux Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Valve is looking very seriously at Linux as a genuine replacement for Windows and the company has put a lot of effort into it. An interesting way of seeing just how much they care is to check the top ten most played games on Steam.

Read more

UAS: USB Attached SCSI now available in the 3.15 kernel, qemu USB-3.0 compatibility coming up

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

At the end of 2013 I've spend 2 full months working on getting XHCI streams support and the UAS driver in the Linux kernel, which uses streams into shape. With the release of the 3.15 kernel this work now is available for end users to use.

This is good news for anyone who cares about performance of USB connected harddisks / ssds. The old usb mass-storage protocol is well known for its poor performance. UAS however allows NCQ and thus allows effectively using the full USB-3 bandwidth. If you've an UAS capable harddisk enclosure then all you need is a 3.15 kernel build with the UAS driver enabled and you should instantly get better performance. Note that most harddisk enclosures, including USB-3 enclosures do not support UAS, so if you want to use UAS double check before buying a harddisk enclosure.

Read more

Meet Cubicle OS 2.3, a Failed Attempt at Building a Proper Linux Distribution

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Cubicle OS is a rather new operating system and it shows, especially from the way it's built. The developer chose to implement GNOME as the default desktop environment, but it looks like he didn't bother to customize it too much.

In fact, this is a rather odd operating system and it even seems that the developer is planning to make some money with it in the near future. At least this is what we can determine from his website.

Read more

Trying Out Nouveau GPU Re-Clocking On Linux 3.16

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With the Linux 3.16 kernel comes the ability to re-clock select NVIDIA GeForce GPUs when using the open-source, reverse-engineered Nouveau driver. Here's my first impressions with trying out this option to maximize the performance of NVIDIA graphics cards on open-source drivers.

As explained previously, the GPUs where Nouveau in Linux 3.16 will support re-clocking are the NV40, NVAA, and NVE0 GPU series. The NV40 chip family is the GeForce 6 and 7 series. The NVAA series meanwhile is part of the NV50 family but consists of just the GeForce 8100/8200/8300 mobile GPUs / nForce 700a series and 8200M G. NVE0 meanwhile is the most interesting of the bunch and consists of the Kepler (GeForce 600/700 series) GPUs. Re-clocking support for other graphics processor generations is still a work-in-progress.

Read more

First handheld Steam Machine revealed

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

A “Steamboy” handheld gaming console teased in a video appears to be the first portable Steam Machine to emerge for Valve’s Linux-based Steam OS platform.

A Steamboy Project site registered under a Steamboy Machine copyright posted a teaser video of what looks to be the first handheld console form-factor Steam Machine (see farther below). The video shows a handheld device with a screen in the middle that resembles a cross between the now-delayed Valve Steam Controller and a Sony PlayStation Vita device.

Read more

IFC6410 Snapdragon 600 dev board now supports Fedora, Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

The IFC6410 Pico-ITX board is a tiny computer-on-a-board powered by the same Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor as the Samsung Galaxy S4 or HTC One M7 smartphones. It sells for $149 and it’s aimed at developers, hobbyists, and others interested in testing their hardware or software designs… but thanks to a few recent developments, you can also use the IFC6410 as a small, inexpensive desktop computer.

It’s now possible to run Ubuntu 14.04, Fedora 20, or other desktop operating systems based on Linux on the little developer board.

Read more

Kubuntu 14.04 LTS Users Can Test the Beautiful Plasma 5 Beta 2 Desktop

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

The new KDE Plasma 5 Beta 2 that was released only a few days ago can be tested in Kubuntu 14.04 LTS with a just a minimum of effort.

The KDE developers are preparing to release the final version of Pasma 5, the replacement of the current desktop that is being used by KDE. It's still in the Beta stages, but the final version is close. The good news is that you can now test it in Kubuntu 14.04 LTS.

Read more

HP's The Machine Open Source OS: Truly Revolutionary

Filed under
Linux

Last week, Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) announced its plan to build a revolutionary new type of computer called The Machine. And here's what makes it truly revolutionary, in all senses of the word: The Machine will run an open source operating system developed in universities, as well as Linux and Android.

Read more

Linux 3.16-rc1 - merge window closed

Filed under
Linux

So it's been two weeks since the merge window opened, and rc1 is out
there and thus the merge window is closed.

It may have been a slightly unusual two week merge window, in that
it's only one week since the release of 3.15 and the first week
overlapped with the last -rc for that previous release, but that
doesn't seem to have affected development much. Things look normal,
and if anything, this is one of the bigger release windows rather than
on the smaller side. It's not quite as big as the merge window for
3.15, but it's actually not that far off.

It also looks fairly usual from a statistics standpoint: about two
thirds of the changes are to drivers (and one third of *that* is to
staging), and half of the remainder is architecture updates (with arm
dominating, dts files leading - but there's mips, powerpc, x86 and
arm64 there too).

Outside of drivers and architecture updates, there's the usual mixture
of changes elsewhere: filesystems (mainly reiserfs, xfs, btrfs, nfs),
networking, "core" kernel (mm, locking, scheduler, tracing), and
tooling (perf and power, also new self-tests).

Also as usual, the shortlog is much too big to be generally useful and
posted as part of this announcement, but you can obviously look at the
details in git. I'm posting the "mergelog" as usual, which I think is
a slightly better way to see the high-level picture. And as usual, it
credits not the people who necessarily wrote the code, but the
submaintainers that sent it to me. For real credits, see the git tree.

Go forth and test,

Linus

Read more

The history of Android: The endless iterations of Google’s mobile OS

Filed under
Android
Linux

Android has been with us in one form or another for more than six years. During that time, we've seen an absolutely breathtaking rate of change unlike any other development cycle that has ever existed. When it came time for Google to dive in to the smartphone wars, the company took its rapid-iteration, Web-style update cycle and applied it to an operating system, and the result has been an onslaught of continual improvement. Lately, Android has even been running on a previously unheard of six-month development cycle, and that's slower than it used to be. For the first year of Android’s commercial existence, Google was putting out a new version every two-and-a-half months.

Read more

Best Weather Applications for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

It is hard to keep up with the weather at times. If you are living in a place where the weather is unpredictable, knowing if it is going to rain or not makes a huge difference to you. That's why you need to keep yourself updated about the weather from time to time.

If you are using Ubuntu or other Linux distro, this isn't hard to do. Linux offers a plethora of options for users to keep an eye on the weather. Here is a selection of some of the best weather applications for your Linux desktop.

Read more

5 reasons why you should switch from Windows XP to Lubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows XP is dead. Some people may not be aware of this fact but I'm telling you now "That parrot is dead".

Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 8th 2014 but what does end of support mean? Does it mean it doesn't work anymore?

Actually, Windows XP will continue to work perfectly well for quite some time but the trouble is that any remaining security holes will remain unplugged and that leaves a huge opportunity for the cyber criminals to exploit any individual or organisation that remains on that platform.

Read more

Also: Announcing Lubuntu Week

The World Cup of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At some point or other 23 of the 32 nations have had a Linux distribution. As you can see by the list I have had to name some discontinued distros and this is the nature of Linux.

Read more

Syndicate content