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Linux

Fedora, Manjaro, and Ubuntu MATE on the Raspberry Pi 2 & 3

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Linux

I'm a bit surprised, disappointed and encouraged all at the same time. Surprised and disappointed by the number of problems that I had with Fedora 25, and the magnitude of some of those problems, particularly on the Pi 2 and with the Fedora spins. I was really hoping that I would be able to install Fedora and just use it reasonably happily, and it did not turn out that way. I will cling to the positive side, though, that this is now an official Fedora distribution, they are continuing to work and improve it, and that means it is very likely going to get steadily better. Perhaps by the time Fedora 26 comes along it will be a lot more like what I was hoping for right now.

But I am encouraged by both Manjaro ARM and Ubuntu MATE. Both of these installed easily and worked really well. Both recognized the Pi 3 built-in WiFi and Bluetooth adapters, and both performed reasonably well.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Has Been Working On An Open-Source GPU Debug Tool, To Be Released Soon

    Yesterday we noted the new open-source AMD GPU debugging tool being developed by a Valve engineer as part of their work on the open-source RADV/RadeonSI/AMDGPU code. It turns out AMD has officially been working on a GPU debugging tool too.

    As noted in that article yesterday it was sad that AMD hadn't to date worked on a full-featured debug tool, especially considering how good Intel's intel-gpu-tools is for debugging and testing, and how many years already AMD has been working on their open-source driver stack without having some official and public open GPU debug tool. Fortunately, it turns out that AMD has been working on such a utility.

  • OpenGL 4.3 Lands For Maxwell With Nouveau Gallium3D, Plus 1.5~3.5x Performance Boost

    It should be a busy end of week for Mesa with the Mesa 17.0 feature freeze being this weekend. In addition to Haswell hitting OpenGL 4.2, Nouveau's NVC0 Gallium3D driver has enabled OpenGL 4.3 support for newer Maxwell and Pascal hardware.

  • OpenGL 4.3 now available in Mesa for nouveau (NVIDIA) for Maxwell and above

    Samuel Pitoiset (Valve developer) just put some fresh work into Mesa-git that enables OpenGL 4.3 with nouveau (NVIDIA) for Maxwell and above.

  • Haswell should now see OpenGL 4.2 thanks to recent work in Mesa

    Mesa is continuing to progress rapidly, as of today Haswell should now support OpenGL 4.2 ready for the next release of Mesa. Only a few days ago Haswell gained OpenGL4, so this progress is amazing.

    Mesa 17 should arrive soon, which means this will be in the next stable release. Mesa switched their versioning, so Mesa 13.1 is now Mesa 17 as they are using a year-based version model.

  • OpenGL 4.2 Now Exposed For Intel Haswell On Mesa 17.0

    Days ago we mentioned the patches were lining up to get Intel's Haswell to OpenGL 4.2 and this morning those patches have landed in Mesa Git ahead of the branching for the Mesa 17.0 release.

  • Updated AMD DC/DAL Patches For Polaris 12, 5K VSR

    Harry Wentland of AMD on Wednesday posted updated DC (DAL) display patches for the AMDGPU code-base.

    This is just the latest of long-running work on getting the DC display stack into shape for hopefully merging into the mainline Linux kernel later this year.

3 to-do list managers for the Linux command line

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Linux

There are dozens, if not more, tools out there that can help you manage your ever-expanding lists of tasks and to-dos. If you want to manage your tasks like a techie, or just feel like going back to basics, the best way to do that is to turn to the command line.

With the software choices that are available, there's no reason why you can't effectively manage your tasks from the command line. You don't need to worry about sacrificing features and functions, either. The three task management tools I look at in this article have something for everyone.

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GNU/Linux Workstations, Major Linux Companies

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GNU
Linux
  • Linux People Should Say, ‘You’re Welcome, Windows Users’

    There was a time when a computer operating system called Windows totally dominated the market, and it sucked. I mean, really sucked. Blue screens of death, unexplained crashes, viruses and worms galore, re-re-reboots all the darn time…and still, despite all the problems, people used this Windows thing. Why? Because except for the artsy/hipster $MacOS, it was the only computer OS you could get for your desktop, and it was the one that ran all the 17 jillion programs businesses wanted their office workers to use. Luckily, Windows has gotten a lot better over the years. Except…was it luck or was it Linux that made Windows improve?

    Before we get into that, let’s talk about cars for a minute. Specifically Volkswagens, Renaults and Fiats. Once upon a time. American cars ruled our nation’s highways and byways. They were big. They had 738 cubic inch Hemiverberator V-8 engines, and loved to stop at gas stations. But hey! Gas was cheap. A couple of friends, maybe me and Indian Ron, could put $5 worth of premium into the big black Chrysler and cruise Van Nuys Boulevard all night or until we found honeys to ride with us, after which…. Sorry, this is a family website.

  • The reason why I can’t use GNU/Linux (for now)

    2) The migration to systemd.

    I won’t write something long here. Because this is not an anti-systemd post.

    I don’t really care if a distribution have or not systemd. If somebody tell me to try X distribution, I do without paying attention of the init.

    What I don’t really like about this is that a lot of distributions are moving to systemd as it was the best thing ever. Some of the did it even when most of the users were against the change.
    For example, Slackware had some users just because it had BSD-style init scripts. But since they moved to systemd, they are like any other distribution but without dependencies handling.

  • Insights on RedHat, SUSE & Canonical; The Major Linux Companies

    Open source software were always promisable. Thanks for the collaboration, opportunities and infrastructure that it provides to both end users and enterprises. Linux is an amazing example for a successful open source code which shapes future.

    The 25-years-old operating system has grown so fast. Today, it is used almost everywhere. From web servers, android devices, supercomputers and to IoT devices. Linux became more than just an operating system to run some lab servers. And because of this, it created huge opportunities for enterprises to benefit from. This market allowed great tech companies to be established to fulfill its needs. Which gave us the 3 major1) Linux companies: Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical.

    The business model for each of the major companies was similar; selling support services and subscriptions for their own open source and Linux-based products. It was the case for most business models in the open source world as well; profit from around the product, not the product itself.

Linux ready COM taps FPGA/ARM Arria 10 SoC

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Linux

Enclustra’s “Mercury+ AA1” COM runs Linux on an Altera Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid with up to 8GB DDR4, up to 8GB eMMC, PCIe Gen 3, and -40 to 85°C support.

Swiss FPGA specialists Enclustra announced a Mercury+ AA1 computer-on-module built around Intel/Altera’s dual-core, Cortex-A9 Arria 10 FPGA/ARM hybrid SoC. The 74 × 54mm module is open for pre-orders, and is said to be “already in use,” suggesting it has entered the sampling stage.

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SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

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Linux
SUSE

Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

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The Newest Linux Operating Systems and Who Should Try Them

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OS
GNU
Linux

Linux operating systems (known as “distributions” or “distros”) have constant releases and updates, with some more substantial than others. Updates usually bring minor fixes and tweaks, but occasionally new distro releases or iterations can yield major changes.

Picking the right distro depends on several factors. Whether it’s a fresh release or major update, check out these new Linux operating systems and who should try them.

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From OSX to Ubuntu

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GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

I didn't debate this for days, I installed the latest available Ubuntu right away as it was the distribution I was using before moving to OSX (I even contributed to a book on it!). I was used to Debian-based systems and knew Ubuntu was still acclaimed for its ease of use and great hardware support. I wasn't disappointed as on the X1 everything was recognized and operational right after the installation, including wifi, bluetooth and external display.

I was greeted with the Unity desktop, which was disturbing as I was a Gnome user back in the days. Up to a point I installed the latter, though in its version 3 flavor, which was also new to me.

I like Gnome3. It's simple, configurable and made me feel productive fast. Though out of bad luck or skills and time to spend investigating, a few things were not working properly: fonts were huge in some apps and normal in others, external display couldn't be configured to a different resolution and dpi ratio than my laptop's, things like that. After a few weeks, I switched back to Unity, and I'm still happily using it today as it has nicely solved all the issues I had with Gnome (which I still like a lot though).

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Tizen Games

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
  • Top 20 Most Popular Tizen Apps and Games in 2016

    Tizen smartphones certainly gained further in popularity during 2016. We had the Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3 models and we are promised more to be released during 2017. During the course of last year, we kept you updated with the Top apps/games that were being downloaded from the Tizen Store, and today we have the Tp 20 most popular Tizen apps and Games in the whole of 2016.

  • Smartphone Game: Genius Test, a good mind test game released in Tizen Store

    Hi guys, many puzzles game released have been released in the Tizen Store. But, a different type of puzzle game in mind testing game is now available. The game named Genius Test has been added by Amjad Chaudhry and copyright of I Need Play.

  • Smartphone Game: Ramble Race 2, ride on your Motorcycle

    Rample Race 2 is a game where you have to drive on a road without crashing. There are different motorcycles that you can buy using virtual money, which you collect by doing various things on the levels.

System76 and Dell with GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Fans of System76 Ubuntu Linux computers can win a trip to the company's Denver headquarters

    "The last Superfan event was a resounding success, bringing together a wide range of Linux enthusiasts doing neat stuff with their System76 computers. Attendees included those working on Linux gaming content, a System76 Android app, tree-planting drones, and an open source personal assistant. During their time at the System76 headquarters the winners shared their feedback on current and future products, as well as joined the team for fun and games," says System76.

  • Dell’s Latest Laptop is $100 Cheaper If You Buy It With Ubuntu

    Dell love Linux. That’s not a bit of marketing fluff designed to look good writ large on a conference banner, but actual, tangible fact.

    Today the company announced the immediate availability of the Dell Precision 3520 mobile workstation (that’s “professional laptop” to you and Sleepy.

    Better yet buyers can save over $100 by choosing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS pre-loaded instead of Windows 10 — now that’s what you call a deal!

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Qt Creator 4.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2.1. This is a pure bugfix release, and takes care of various important bugs.
  • KTextEditor depends on KSyntaxHighlighting
    Recently, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was added to the KDE Frameworks 5.29 release. And starting with KDE Frameworks 5.29, KTextEditor depends on KSyntaxHighlighting. This also means that KTextEditor now queries KSyntaxHighlighting for available xml highlighting files.
  • [Krita] Interview with Adam
    Good day. My name is Adam and I am a 26-year-old person who is trying to learn how to draw…
  • [Krita] We’re doing a User Survey!
    While we’re still working on Vector, Text and Python Scripting, we’ve already decided: This year, we want to spend on stabilizing and polishing Krita!

More of today's howtos

Linux and Graphics

ASUS "Tinker Board"

  • Asus takes on Raspberry Pi with 4K-capable Tinker Board
    Tech giant Asus is taking on the Raspberry Pi with its own DIY-friendly single-board computer that's said to offer 4K video playback and 24-bit audio support in exchange for a hefty £55 price tag.
  • ASUS "Tinker Board" Powered By Rockchip ARM SoC, Supports Debian
    Making its rounds this morning as a "Raspberry Pi competitor" is the Tinker Board from ASUS. The Tinker Board is ASUS' take on an ARM SBC similar to what's already offered by a plethora of vendors. The Tinker Board features a quad-core 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 processor with ARM Mali T764 graphics and there is 2GB of DDR3 memory.