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Arch Linux 2017.09.01 Is Available for Download, Powered by Linux Kernel 4.12.8

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GNU
Linux

A new month, a new ISO snapshot of the popular Arch Linux operating system sees the light of day, offering newcomers or those who want to deploy the OS on new systems an up-to-date installation medium.

Arch Linux 2017.09.01 is the Arch Linux ISO snapshot for September 2017, powered by the Linux 4.12.8 kernel, incorporating all the software updates and security patches, as well as other tweaks that have been released through the official repositories of the GNU/Linux distribution during the entire month of August 2017.

It's the most up-to-date Arch Linux installation medium, and you should download it if you want to deploy the operating system on new hardware or you want to reinstall your broken Arch Linux OS without having to download hundreds of updates from the repositories after the installation.

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AMD Secure Processor Support and Sound in Linux 4.14

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Linux
  • AMD Secure Processor Support In Linux 4.14

    The crypto subsystem updates have been pulled in for the Linux 4.14 kernel and it includes more complete AMD Secure Processor support, among other changes.

  • Sound Updates Ready To Be Heard On Linux 4.14

    Takashi Iwai of SUSE has mailed in his sound driver updates for the Linux 4.14 kernel. This time around there isn't too many speaker-shattering changes, but a wide range of fixes and a few notable changes.

Ditching Apple and Microsoft for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
  • Switching to xmonad + Gnome – and ditching a Mac

    I have been using XFCE with xmonad for years now. I’m not sure exactly how many, but at least 6 years, if not closer to 10. Today I threw in the towel and switched to Gnome.

    More recently, at a new job, I was given a Macbook Pro. I wasn’t entirely sure what to think of this, but I thought I’d give it a try. I found MacOS to be extremely frustrating and confining. It had no real support for a tiling window manager, and although projects like amethyst tried to approximate what xmonad can do on Linux, they were just too limited by the platform and were clunky. Moreover, the entire UI was surprisingly sluggish; maybe that was an induced effect from animations, but I don’t think that explains it. A Debisn stretch install, even on inferior hardware, was snappy in a way that MacOS never was. So I have requested to swap for a laptop that will run Debian. The strange use of Command instead of Control for things, combined with the overall lack of configurability of keybindings, meant that I was going to always be fighting muscle memory moving from one platform to another. Not only that, but being back in the world of a Free Software OS means a lot.

  • Google is trying to poach Microsoft Azure partners by sending them free Chromebooks
  • Google’s Cloud Team Is Sending Chromebooks To Microsoft Partners

     

    Microsoft has its Azure platform, Amazon has AWS, Google is entering the arena with Google Cloud and each company is throwing serious money to grab a slice of this market as it continues to expand.

  • Windows loses the market share growth battle against Linux [Ed: Almost no site (that I've stumbled upon) mentions that the firm behind these numbers is Microsoft-connected. Microsoft sites like this one say Windows "market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%." But no, it's more like 50%. ChromeOS, Android etc. are conveniently unaccounted for.]

    In August, Windows dropped to a 90.70% market share from 91.45% from July, despite Microsoft’s effort. This drop of 0.75% is the biggest one that the operating system had recorded since April 2016. Back then, the OS’s market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%.

3 Cool Linux Service Monitors

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Linux

The Linux world abounds in monitoring apps of all kinds. We're going to look at my three favorite service monitors: Apachetop, Monit, and Supervisor. They're all small and fairly simple to use. apachetop is a simple real-time Apache monitor. Monit monitors and manages any service, and Supervisor is a nice tool for managing persistent scripts and commands without having to write init scripts for them.

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Android Oreo Adds Linux Kernel Requirements and New Hardening Features

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Android
Linux

The Linux kernel continues to add security protections so developers don’t have to build them on their own. As a result, one of the first steps security experts recommend for protecting against embedded Linux malware threats is to work with the latest possible kernel release and then regularly update field devices. Now that Android is getting long in the tooth -- it was nine years ago this month that Sergey Brin and Larry Page rollerbladed onto the stage to announce the debut of the flagship HTC G1 phone -- more and more Android devices are being attacked due to out-of-date Linux kernels. To address the problem before it adds to Android’s substantial challenge with malware generated from rogue or unprotected apps, Google has announced new requirements in Android 8.0 (“Oreo”) to build on Linux kernels no older than kernel 4.4.

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Latest Parted Magic Release Adds Support for GParted 0.29.0, Linux Kernel 4.12.9

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Linux

Patrick Verner, the creator of the Parted Magic live system designed for disk partitioning, closing and erasing, as well as data recovery and rescue, and system benchmarking tasks, announced the release of Parted Magic 2017_09_05.

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GNU Linux-Libre 4.13 Kernel Launches Officially for Those Who Seek 100% Freedom

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GNU
Linux

Alexandre Oliva, the maintainer of the GNU Linux-libre project, an Open Source initiative to provide a 100% free version of the Linux kernel to those who seek 100% freedom, announced the release of the GNU Linux-libre 4.13 kernel.

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Bodhi Linux With Moksha Is Truly Enlightening

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Linux
Reviews

Bodhi Linux is a very functional alternative to the run-of-the-mill distro offerings. It will extend users' comfort zones as they get familiar with its different computing procedures. Newcomers to Linux, not knowing how Linux "is supposed to work," actually may have an easier time gaining proficiency in using this Enlightened approach to computing.

The Midori browser by default loads a help file with wiki-like links to some startup information. That file is part of the installation content, so new users can access the quick start guide and FAQ topics even if they are not able to access a wireless Internet connection.

Minimum hardware specs include a 500-Mhz processor with 256 MB of RAM and 4 GB of drive space.

Recommended specs are a 1.0-Ghz processor with 512 MB of RAM and 10 GB of drive space.

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Jetson TX2 camera add-on features 6x HD cameras

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Linux

E-con has launched a Linux-driven camera system for the Jetson TX1 and TX2 dev kits with six 3.4MP, HD cameras that stream in uncompressed YUV422.

Embedded vendor E-con Systems has long been known for its Linux-driven embedded camera modules and boards such as its i.MX6 based e-CAM50IMX6. Now, the company has launched an ambitious, six-camera “e-CAM30_HEXCUTX2” solution designed to work with Nvidia developer kits for the Nvidia Jetson TX1 and Jetson TX2 computer-on-modules.

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Linux: Linux 4.14, LXC 2.1, and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Add-on board expands i.MX6 UL SBC

MYIR released an add-on board for its Linux-driven, i.MX6 UL-based MYS-6ULX SBC that adds a second LAN port, plus CAN, RS485, camera, audio, and RTC. In April, MYIR released a Linux-powered MYS-6ULX SBC, which was notable for being available in two different versions using NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) or the more affordable, and almost identical i.MX6 ULL SoC. Now, MYIR has released an “MYB-6ULX Expansion Board” designed to stack onto either model. The $21.20 accessory adds a second 10/100 Ethernet port to the MYS-6ULX, as well as new CAN, RS485, audio, micro-USB, RTC, and camera functions. Read more

Hardware: PocketBeagle, Purism Librem 5, Aaeon Embedded PCs

Finding the Mainframers of the Future Through Open Source Ecosystem Development

Speak the word “mainframe” to many millennial techies, and the first things that likely come to mind are in the form of grainy sepia photos of floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall computers with big spinning tapes. But that’s far from the reality of the modern mainframe. Imagine instead up to 240 10-core, 5.2ghz processors, 32TB of RAIM (redundant array of independent memory), hardware-based encryption, and fully hot-swappable hardware components. Those are the specs of the newly released IBM z14 – a single machine that could replace the computing resources of an average corporate data center with room to spare. Read more

Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Days and KDE's Randa

  • Introducing The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Networking Days
    One of my primary goals at The Linux Foundation is to foster innovation across the entire open source networking ecosystem. This involves coordinating across multiple open source projects and initiatives and identifying key areas for collaboration to create an open source networking stack. We are working across the entire ecosystem with industry-leading partners — from developers to service providers to vendors — to unify various open source components and create solutions that will accelerate network transformation. As part of this journey, I am pleased to introduce Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days), a series of free events that are hosted and organized by local user groups and The Linux Foundation members, with support from our projects, including DPDK, FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, and others.
  • Randa news, release update
    Last week, from wednesday to saturday I attended KDE’s annual Randa sprint organized by wonderful people. This was an occasion to work fulltime on Kdenlive.