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Linux

Kernel: Linux 4.16, LizardFS, ZFS, XFS

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Linux

Linux Foundation: MOOC, OPNFV, Open Source Leadership Summit

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Linux
  • ​One million Linux and open-source software classes taken

    Want to get a job in IT? Then, you need to know Linux and open-source software. While nothing beats hands-on experience, classes are a great way to get started. So, it comes as no surprise that The Linux Foundation recently announced would-be IT staffers have now taken a million Linux and open-source software classes.

    The Linux Foundation has been able to reach so many students because of its partnership with edX. EdX is the non-profit online learning platform from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Their popular massive open online courses (MOOC) make it possible for you to take classes anywhere in the world on your schedule.

  • Crossing a New Milestone in NFV: Open Source Verification of Commercial Products

    As we kick off 2018, the OPNFV Compliance & Certification committee—the members driven body within OPNFV that defines recommendations to the Board for policies and oversight for compliance and certification—is pleased to announce the launch of the OPNFV Verified Program (OVP). The program is designed to simplify adoption of NFV in commercial products by establishing an industry threshold based on OPNFV releases. The fact we are using an open source platform as referent to measure compliance of commercial products—not necessarily based on its source code—is a new and innovative step for the industry.

  • Session Agenda Announced for The Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the schedule of sessions and speakers for Open Source Leadership Summit, taking place March 6-8 in Sonoma, CA.

RK3399 based Odroid-N1 SBC doubles up on SATA III

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Linux

Hardkernel unveiled a community-backed “Odroid-N1” SBC with a Rockchip RK3399, GbE and HDMI 2.0 ports, a 40-pin GPIO, and a pair each of PCIe-based SATA III, USB 3.0, and USB 2.0 ports.

The Rockchip RK3399 juggernaut continues to roll through the open-spec single-board computer world, with Hardkernel’s Odroid project the latest to tap the hexa-core SoC. Hardkernel released images, specs, and extensive benchmarks on a prototype for its storage-oriented Odroid-N1 board, which it plans to launch for about $110 in May or June.

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Tiny i.MX7 module runs both Linux and FreeRTOS

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Linux

F&S announced a 40 x 35mm “PicoCore MX7ULP” module that can run Linux and FreeRTOS on an NXP i.MX7. You also get up to 32GB eMMC plus optional WiFi/BT and extended temp support.

F&S Elektronik Systeme, which has produced a number of NXP-based COMs over the years, including the i.MX6 UL based efus A7UL and QorIQ LS1012A based efus A53LS, has launched the first in a new line of pin-compatible PicoCore branded modules that feature a tiny 40 x 35mm footprint. The PicoCore MX7ULP, which will formally launch at Embedded World (Feb. 27-Mar. 1), and ship in the third quarter, features NXP’s power-sipping i.MX7 SoC.

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Open Source and Standards Team: How Red Hat Measures Open Source Success

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Linux
Red Hat
OSS

Red Hat is, by its very nature, a deviation from the norm in this series of profiles. It is not a company with an open source program, but rather an open source company with an open source and standards office and an engineering team dedicated to curating communities and tending upstream contributions. In essence, Red Hat is a living, breathing testament to the success of open source. However, it still benefited from some organization and goal-setting in its community efforts.

“The Open Source and Standards office, or what some would refer to as an open source program office, was established six years ago to create a consistent way to support communities which Red Hat is actively participating. We created a centralized organization of expertise and resource to support our goals by flanking the considerable upstream engineering efforts ,” explained Deborah Bryant, senior director, Open Source and Standards, in the office of the CTO at Red Hat.

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The best VPN for Linux in 2018

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Linux

Linux is a great option for privacy-minded users in general, due to its open source and transparent nature, and the fact that there are even specific distros for the privacy conscious. But you can take things a step further on Linux with a VPN service that adds a whole extra layer of security to keep your internet connection private. Not to mention the other benefits of VPNs, such as unblocking content or circumventing censorship.

While Linux users routinely draw the short straw in terms of software support for their beloved OS, when it comes to VPNs, the situation isn’t so bad, with a decent amount of providers offering native apps for Linux.

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Pi Desktop: useful, desirable, but Linux skills required

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Linux

With the launch of Forthings – Farnell’s new PayPal-enabled website for makers and educators – I noticed Pi Desktop, a lovely-looking tiny Raspberry Pi 3 based desktop computer – just what I am looking for as used a Pi 3 as my home computer, until I got fed up with the tangle of cables.

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Why Linux is better than Windows or macOS for security

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Linux

Enterprises invest a lot of time, effort and money in keeping their systems secure. The most security-conscious might have a security operations center. They of course use firewalls and antivirus tools. They probably spend a lot of time monitoring their networks, looking for telltale anomalies that could indicate a breach. What with IDS, SIEM and NGFWs, they deploy a veritable alphabet of defenses.

But how many have given much thought to one of the cornerstones of their digital operations: the operating systems deployed on the workforce’s PCs? Was security even a factor when the desktop OS was selected?

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Top 5 Linux Partition Managers

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Linux

There are many programs out there that help users manage partitions on their drives. Some, like fdisk, are command-line tools. Others have a GUI (graphical user interface), like GParted. I shall demonstrate, today, five very good Linux partition managers, both graphical and text-only.​

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ExTiX 18.2 with Deepin 15.5 Desktop, Refracta snapshot, Calamares 3.1.9 Installer and kernel 4.15.1-exton – Build 180206

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GNU
Linux

I’ve released a new version of ExTIX 18.2 Deepin today with Calamares 3.1.9 installed from source and kernel 4.15.1-x86_64-exton. Calamares is an installer framework. By design it is very customizable, in order to satisfy a wide variety of needs and use cases. All packages have been updated to the latest available version as of today. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin Build 180206.

About ExTiX 18.2 with the Deepin 15.5 Desktop
I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Deepin 15.5 Desktop (made in China!). Deepin is devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. Only a minimum of packages are installed in ExTiX Deepin. You can of course install all packages you want. Even while running ExTiX Deepin live. I.e. from a DVD or USB stick. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin.

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FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers