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New Release of Parted Magic

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Parted Magic 2017_03_14 News

    For the most part this is a maintenance release with a few nice feature additions. We created a GUI to extract embedded Windows product keys. It’s located in the Rescue menu. The output is also saved to a text file so you can just copy it to a USB drive. Some of the newer machines like the DELL XPS 13 are now freezing the NVMe drives at boot. The machine needs to be put to sleep and woken up just like standard SSD drives. We added a sleep button to the NVMe Secure Erase program to overcome this.

    As always, Parted Magic was released with the latest Xorg drivers and Linux Kernel 4.10.1.

  • Parted Magic 2017_03_14 Adds Tool to Extract Embedded Windows Product Keys, More

    Parted Magic creator Patrick Verner is announcing the release of Parted Magic 2017_03_14, a brand-new ISO snapshot of the commercial GNU/Linux distribution designed for disk partitioning, cloning, and rescue operations.

    Parted Magic 2017_03_14 comes more than two months after the Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release, which was also the first to kick off the new year, and implements a bunch of interesting new features, such as a graphical tool that promises to let users extract embedded Windows product keys.

Linux Foundation and Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Docker Donating ContainerD to Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    In December 2016, Solomon Hykes, the founder of Docker, announced a re-focused containerd (Con-tay-ner-D) initiative, spinning out the core container runtime from the Docker Engine community project. At the time, it wasn't entirely clear where containerd would land, but now the picture has come into focus, as Docker is sending containerd to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

  • Canonical Releases Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to Patch 2 Flaws

    Canonical published a few moments ago a new security notice to inform users of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users about the availability of a kernel update for their systems.

    Two kernel vulnerabilities are affecting Ubuntu 16.04, 16.04.1, and 16.04.2 users that are still using a kernel from the long-term supported Linux 4.4 series, including the Linux kernel for Raspberry Pi 2 devices, Snapdragon processors, as well as Google Container Engine (GKE) and Amazon Web Services (AWS) systems.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.54 LTS Is a Small Patch with Updated GPU and InfiniBand Drivers

    After releasing the Linux 4.10.3 and Linux 4.9.15 LTS kernels, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the availability of the fifty-fourth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

  • Linux Kernel 4.9.15 LTS Released with Updated GPU Drivers, Various Improvements

    Immediately after announcing the availability of Linux kernel 4.10.3, renowned Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman released the fifteenth maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel series.

    That's right, we're talking about Linux kernel 4.9.15 LTS, which comes only three days after the release of the Linux 4.9.14 patch, which shipped with numerous improvements. Linux kernel 4.9.15 LTS is half of the previous update, and according to the appended shortlog, it changes a total of 82 files, with 690 insertions and 342 deletions.

Accenture, Microsoft Proxy

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Row over 'very limited' Linux PCs escalates in Munich [Ed: Microsoft and Accenture working together to undermine GNU/Linux and 'make an example' or send out a warning]

    With the controversy now escalating into a very public debate, it's currently unknown which operating system Munich will be using for the next decade. Linux is currently deployed on 20,000 computers across the city. Converting them all back to Windows will take months of further work.

    While it's attracted the most attention, Munich isn't the only city to have shunned Windows in favour of open-source software. Last September, Moscow abandoned Microsoft's Outlook email program in favour of its own system. Concerns about the use of proprietary software in government departments have also been raised across the world, including in the UK where a long-running but slowly progressing campaign is encouraging Linux usage

  • Accenture and Docker Team on Container Services

    Accenture has expanded its relationship with Docker to enhance its existing multicloud Container as a Service solutions. The company will leverage Docker Datacenter to provide enterprises with the capabilities needed to secure the software supply chain, expand workload portability, and improve application resilience.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • How to build an IoT project with Mongoose OS

    It could be a small single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi, which costs around US $30, BeagleBone for approximately US $60, Intel Edison for US $70, or other similar devices. These computers usually run Linux. These are suitable for some tasks, like being a gateway device, but again they are quite large, very power hungry, and too expensive to run on things like sensors, wearables, and small appliances.

  • A Look at MINIBIAN: A Minimalist Image for Raspberry Pi

    My way of celebrating Pi Day (March 14th = 3.14) was to take a look at an awesome little image for the Raspberry Pi called Minibian. A new edition of Minibian was released on 12 March 2017, updating the image with support for the latest RPi 3B and other improvements.

    Minibian is based on and fully compatible with the official Raspbian “Jesse” software. It is meant to be used for embedded linux and server type situations, and that is great for IoT scenarios. There is no desktop environment and much effort has gone to providing a minimalist operating system that conserves system resources. The 12 March release of Minibian boasts a 15 second boot time, 31 MB of RAM usage, 477 MB of disk space usage, and is small enough to fit on a 1GB SD card. My test install and inspection of Minibian shows that these claims are indeed correct.

  • Tough, 84 x 55mm Intel Atom COM offers soldered memory

    Eurotech’s rugged, Linux-friendly “CPU-163-15” is an 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Bay Trail Atoms and soldered ECC and eMMC.

    Eurotech’s Intel Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CPU-163-15 COM Express Type 10 Mini module continues the Amaro, Italy based company’s tradition of offering rugged embedded boards with support for its cloud-based Everyware Software Framework (ESF) IoT platform. Other recent Intel-based COM Express modules from Eurotech include the CPU-161-18, a headless COM Express Type 6 Compact module with a 12-core Xeon-D1500 from the Broadwell generation.

  • BQ Deutschland releases Android 7.1.1 OTA for the Aquaris X5 Plus (while most of us still haven't received 7.0)

7 Ways You Can Use Linux to Organize Your Life

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Many people have taken to using smartphones to keep their lives in order, but not you! You have a system in place that you’ve perfected over years, and your laptop or desktop remains your primary means of keeping everything in order. But now you’re switching to Linux, and you want to know what’s out there.

Linux may not have the same apps you’ve grown accustomed to, but there’s no shortage of software that can help you keep track of everything. Whether it’s juggling dates or managing your finances, Linux has plenty of tools to organize your life. Here’s a taste, one category at a time.

Read more

Also: Microsoft is disgustingly sneaky: Windows 10 isn't an operating system, it's an advertising platform

How to write SD cards for the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

Writing SD cards for the Raspberry Pi is something that every member of the Pi community has attempted. Some are old hats and tackle the task with aplomb, but for some it strikes fear into their hearts.

In this article, I look at two different ways to write an SD card. First using the latest application to offer a simple GUI, Etcher. Then, I take a look at dcfldd, a Linux terminal command that expands on the popular dd command and offers much more functionality.

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Linux 4.4.54

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.54 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.15

Desktop Linux the best it’s ever been—and keeps getting better

Filed under
Linux

While users of proprietary operating systems suffer with new, slower, buggier, more spy-filled systems, Linux users are enjoying better performance and more support.

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Colibri COM offers WiFi, Bluetooth, and a new i.MX6 ULL SoC

Filed under
Linux

Toradex unveiled a Linux-driven Colibri module with NXP’s i.MX6 ULL SoC that offers industrial temperature support and dual-band WiFi-ac and BT 4.2/BLE.

Toradex has revealed preliminary specs — but so far no photo — of its Colibri iMX6ULL — the first of Toradex’s 67.6 x 36.7mm Colibri modules to offer onboard wireless. It’s also the first embedded board we’ve seen that features NXP’s new cost-optimized version of the i.MX6 UL (UltraLite) called the i.MX6 ULL. The module will ship in the third quarter.

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A Penguin tries FreeBSD as a desktop operating system

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

A Penguin tries FreeBSD 11.0 RELEASE on an old i386 PC as his main desktop operating system, for the first time, for a weekend.

The story begins, you guess, with the operating system installation using the FreeBSD i386 hybrid image in order to boot a USB key.

Read more

Also: openbsd changes of note 7

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Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics