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More on Release of Linux Mint 18.3

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GNU
Linux
  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' is here -- replace Windows 10 with the Ubuntu-based operating system now!

    Linux Mint is a great operating system. For those that want an alternative to Windows 10, it is a wonderful choice for two specific reasons. For one, it has a superior user interface. Whether you opt for the Cinnamon desktop environment or instead choose Mate, you will have a more intuitive experience than the insanity that is Windows 10. Secondly and more importantly, however, you don't have to worry about a billion dollar company tracking all of your activity. While telemetry sometimes has its benefits, Microsoft seems to have forgotten that their operating system is a guest on your computer. Again, it is your computer -- not the Windows-maker's.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 MATE and Cinnamon released

    The Linux Mint team has released version 18.3 of the popular Linux distribution as MATE and Cinnamon versions to the public.

    Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support released; this means that the development team will support it with updates until 2021.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 brings software manager, backup improvements

    Linux Mint has a reputation for being an easy-to-use Linux distribution, making it a good option for folks who may be new to Linux, but already familiar with Windows or macOS.

    The latest version of Linux Mint is out this week, and it’s a long-term support release that will be officially supported until 2021. For the most part, Linux Mint 18.3 is an incremental update, but it does have a few major improvements.

Gemini PDA, First Take: Return of the Psion Series 5, in Android/Linux form

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Android
Linux

Amid the barrage of Android phones desperate to differentiate themselves via camera technology, overlay software or physical design comes something truly different: the Gemini PDA. Gemini is an Android/Linux hybrid in a tiny clamshell chassis with a keyboard that's truly magnificent.

This Indiegogo-backed project is an unashamed homage to the Psion Series 5, the iconic Personal Digital Assistant that launched (hold your breath) 20 years ago in 1997. The Gemini's relationship to the earlier ground-breaker is clear in its physical design, in some of its software features, and in the general ethos of those who are bringing it to market. When I spoke with Dr Janko Mrsic-Flogel, CEO of Planet Computers -- the company behind Gemini -- he explained that his ethos is to be true to the original device, while also creating something exciting for the modern user.

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Also: Rugged mini-PC supports Linux on Apollo Lake

Linux Kernel 4.13 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.14 LTS Now

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Linux

At the end of last week, the developer announced the sixteenth maintenance update to the Linux 4.13 kernel series, versioned 4.13.16, which appears to be the last to be released for the branch. This means that Linux 4.13 won't receive any other updates.

Therefore, if you're using a kernel from the Linux 4.13 series, you need to upgrade to Linux kernel 4.13.16 or prepare to upgrade to the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel, which is a long-term support release that should be maintained for the next few years.

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How did Linux come to dominate supercomputing?

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Linux

After years of pushing toward total domination, Linux finally did it. It is running on all 500 of the TOP500 supercomputers in the world, and who knows how many more after that. That’s even more impressive than Intel’s domination of the list, with 92 percent of the processors in the top 500.

So, how did Linux get here? How did this upstart operating system created by a college student from Finland 26 years ago steamroll Unix, a creation of Bell Labs and supported by giants like IBM and Sun Microsystems and HP, Microsoft’s Windows, and other Unix derivatives?

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Hands On with Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon and MATE

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Linux
Reviews

This is a fundamentally good decision, considering the limited resources available to the Mint development team, and how different KDE is from Linux Mint's core distributions of Cinnamon and MATE. Not only at the user interface level but perhaps even more importantly at the development level, the libraries, the utilities and applications, pretty much everything is different. But that is not going to make this hurt any less for the long-time dedicated Mint KDE users.

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4MLinux 24.0 GNU/Linux Distro to Arrive March 2018 with GCC 7.1, Linux 4.9 LTS

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Linux

Development of the 4MLinux 24.0 operating system was kicked off two weeks ago with the release of the 4MLinux 24.0 Core Beta edition, on which 4MLinux 24.0 is based, as well as any other GNU/Linux distributions created by the developer, including TheSSS, 4MParted, 4MRescue, Antivirus Live CD, and BakAndImgCD.

Shipping with up-to-date core components, the 4MLinux 24.0 Beta is now ready for testing, powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.9.52 kernel and GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 7.1.0 compiler, which is used by default for all the apps included in the distribution. You can study the list of pre-installed packages for more details.

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Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.5 Officially Released, Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

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Linux

Based on the Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.5 uses the latest Xfce 4.12 desktop environment by default for the Desktop edition and it's powered by the upstream Linux 4.10.0-40 kernel. This is the first release of the OS two ship with two editions, Desktop and Core.

"The first is full-featured, offering everything users need," said Roberto J. Dohnert. "Core is designed for embedded systems, IoT devices and users who want to build their own systems from the ground up; servers, appliances and specialized desktop environments can be brought out of Core."

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Linux Mint 18.3

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Officially Released with Cinnamon and MATE Editions

    The Linux Mint team announced a few moments ago the general availability of the Cinnamon and MATE editions of their latest Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" operating system.

    Dubbed Sylvia, Linux Mint 18.3 is now officially out with the latest Cinnamon 3.6 and MATE 1.18 desktop environments. The distribution is powered by the Linux 4.10 kernel from Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and includes many new features and improvements, along with updated components from the upstream software repositories.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” Cinnamon released!

    Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” MATE released!

    Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 released

    Linux Mint has released 18.3 "Sylvia" in Cinnamon and MATE editions. Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. Both editions feature a revamped Software Manager with support for flatpaks. See more about what's new in the Cinnamon and MATE editions or check out the release notes for Cinnamon and MATE.

'Big four' Linux companies shift open-source licensing policies

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The GNU Public License version 2 (GPLv2) is arguably the most important open-source license for one reason: It's the license Linux uses. On November 27, three Linux-using technology powers, Facebook, Google, and IBM, and the major Linux distributor Red Hat announced they would extend additional rights to help companies who've made GPLv2 open-source license compliance errors and mistakes.

The GPLv2 and its close relative, GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) are widely-used open source software licenses. When the GPL version 3 (GPLv3) was released, it came with an express termination approach that offered users opportunities to cure errors in license compliance. This termination policy in GPLv3 provided a way for companies to repair licensing errors and mistakes. This approach allows license compliance enforcement that is consistent with community norms.

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Linux Kernel Developer: Mauro Carvalho Chehab

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Linux
Interviews

This year, I did a lot of patches that improves Linux documentation. A lot of them were related to the conversion from the XML-based DocBook docs to a markup language (Restructured Text). Thanks to that, no documents use the legacy document system anymore. I also finally closed the documentation gap at the DVB API, with was out of sync for more than 10 years! I also did several bug fixes at the media subsystem, including the 4.9 breakage of many drivers that were doing DMA via stack.

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More in Tux Machines

FLOSSophobia

I have seen it many times. "Linux is a cancer". "Open sauce". "Linuxtard". I even remember the teacher who did not bring a laptop for her presentation and, when I offered her my Linux netbook, she rejected it as if I had presented her something illegal. She tried to use an old Windows computer instead but, when the computer failed, she ended up displaying her presentation with my Linux netbook. Clearly, this teacher's position was not based on ignorance or lack of expertise because she knew Linux existed and all she had to do was to display slides. Her refusal was due to indoctrination: she had learned that Linux and non-Microsoft office suites had to be rejected. Read more

Today in Techrights

Hands on With elementary OS Powered Centurion Nano Laptop by Alpha Store

If you want to buy a new laptop, no doubt you should consider the Centurion line. It will be a good choice for you, Linux aficionado. As well as for your Windows-addicted husband/wife/employees. The Centurion Nano is certainly not a “gamer” laptop. However, besides that particular use case, and for an interesting price, you will get a very competent computer, 100% compatible with Linux and usable for a broad range of tasks. Read more

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.