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Linux

14 Linux and open source conferences worth attending in 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Whether your budget permits you to attend large, global events or just small local shows, there's a Linux and open source conference to suit everyone.

As I write this at the end of 2017, my thoughts turn to holiday celebrations, friends and family, and setting up my 2018 Linux and open source trade show calendar. OK, so maybe everyone doesn't put that last item on their project planning list, but when you cover Linux and open source as deeply as I do, detailed scheduling is necessary.

Even if you don’t live and breathe open source, I highly recommend you attend at least one conference that fits your schedule and travel budget. The technical know-how you gain can make your life easier, and it’s helpful to know what’s on the horizon. Sometimes, a single how-to presentation can save you a week of work or a panel discussion can help you formulate your company’s IT strategy—and that justifies the cost.

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On GUADEC:

  • Sam Thursfield: 2017 in review

    The single biggest event was certainly bringing GUADEC 2017 to Manchester. I had various goals for this such as ensuring we got a GUADEC 2017, showing my colleages at Codethink that GNOME is a great community, and being in the top 10 page authors on wiki.gnome.org for the year. The run up to the event from about January to July took up many evenings and it was sometimes hard to trade it off with my work at Codethink; it was great working with Allan, Alberto, Lene and Javier though and once the conference actually arrived there was a mass positive force from all involved that made sure it went well. The strangest moment was definitely walking into Kro Bar slightly before the preregistration event was due to start to find half the GNOME community already crammed into the tiny bar area waiting for something to happen. Obviously my experience of organizing music events (where you can expect people to arrive about 2 hours after you want them somewhere) didn’t help here.

Samsung Z4 review: Are Samsung underestimating Tizen’s smartphone capabilities

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Linux
Reviews

So the Samsung Z4 although is somewhat better than the Z2, is still far behind the quality that the Z3 brought as a Tizen smartphone. There were a lot of expectations which Samsung continued to not meet and hence puts a doubt on us on how far, Samsung is looking to go with Tizen as an OS for smartphones. With Samsung being the only OEMs making Tizen smartphones, our expectations of a true flagship or at least a mid-range powerful Tizen smartphone are slowly starting to vanish. And we really hope, Samsung proves us wrong if there is a next time.

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Tizen OS set to dominate 70% of the global smart TV market this year

Filed under
OS
Linux

Smart TV refers to digital TVs that use various operating systems (OS) such as Tizen (Samsung) webOS (LG), FirefoxOS (Panasonic) and Android (Sony). This year saw the advent of numerous smart TV’s and one of the leading manufacturers of these products is Samsung Electronics. This company has released TVs with multiple sizes, specs, and compatibility. It successfully debuted “The Frame“, a smart TV which is more like an artwork hung on a wall when not in use. For the first time, Samsung’s TV sales volume is expected to surpass 70%. With the inclusion of advanced features such as voice recognition, Artificial Intelligence (AI), and a variety of content that runs on the latest Tizen operating system, Samsung Electronics is certainly leading the growth of the smart TV market. According to market researcher IHS Markit and the electronics industry, the share of smart TV in the global TV market this year is estimated to account for over 60% of total TV sales.

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Latest $20 Orange Pi runs Android 7.0 on new Allwinner H6

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Android
Linux

The video-focused “Orange Pi One Plus” updates the Orange Pi One design with a new, 10-bit HDR 4K enabled quad -A53 Allwinner H6 SoC with Mali-T720, and provides GbE and HDMI 2.0 ports.

Shenzhen Xunlong has updated its $10, two-year old Orange Pi One SBC with a similarly open source, $20 Orange Pi One Plus that features the new set-top box focused, Allwinner H6 SoC. Otherwise, it has an almost identical feature set, layout, and 68 x 48mm footprint as the Allwinner H3-based Orange Pi One.

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Open source, sandwich-style CubieAIO SBCs tap the Actions S700 and S500 SoCs

Filed under
Linux
OSS

CubieTech unveiled “CubieAIO-S700” and “CubieAIO-S500” SBCs, and opened global sales of the CubieBoard6, which like the recent CubieBoard7, are all based on Actions Sx00 SoCs.

CubieTech’s CubieBoard line of open source ARM SBCs was once a major contender in the hacker board market, but there hasn’t been much shaking over the last few years. That changed in May with an Allwinner A20-based CubieAIO-A20 SBC. In July, CubieTech acquired the application processor unit of Actions Technology. Since then, CubieTech has launched several Actions-based open source SBCs that run Linux and Android.

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Linux Lite 3.8 Is the Last One to Be Released for Series 3, Coming February 1

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Linux

Scheduled for launch on February 1, 2018, as the last release in the Linux Lite 3 series, Linux Lite 3.8 promises to introduce various improvements and tweaks, along with updated components and some new features. The most important of them all being the implementation of the TLP power management tool for laptops in Lite Tweaks.

"TLP brings you the benefits of advanced power management for Linux without the need to understand every technical detail," reads project's website. "TLP comes with a default configuration already optimized for battery life, so you may just install and forget it. Nevertheless, TLP is highly customizable to fulfill your specific requirements."

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Puppy Linux Derivative Fatdog64 Gets New Release with Linux 4.14, UEFI Installer

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Linux

Prominent new features of the Fatdog64 720 release include a UEFI Installer that lets users install the GNU/Linux distribution on modern UEFI machines using USB flash drives, the implementation of LICK Installer 1.2 by default in the ISO image, and libinput support for X.Org Server by default, replacing Synaptics and evdev.

Fatdog64 720 also ships with a home-made touchpad configuration client designed as a drop-in replacement for flSynclient, a new keyboard layout that supports multiple layouts, support for dual-nano initrd in the ISO image, as well as new and updated parameters including waitdev and mergeinitrd{n}.

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Dual Boot Ubuntu And Arch Linux

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Linux

​Dual booting Ubuntu and Arch Linux is not as easy as it sounds, however, I’ll make the process as easy as possible with much clarity. First, we will need to install Ubuntu then Arch Linux since it's much easier configuring the Ubuntu grub to be able to dual boot Ubuntu and Arch Linux.

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Syzbot: Google Continuously Fuzzing The Linux Kernel

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Linux
Google

On the Linux kernel mailing list over the past week has been a discussion about Syzbot, an effort by Google for continuously fuzzing the mainline Linux kernel and its branches with automatic bug reporting.

Syzbot is the automation bot around Syzkaller, the Google-developed unsupervised kernel fuzzer that has since been extended to support FreeBSD, Fuchsia, NetBSD, and Windows. For those curious how the Syzkaller fuzzer works, it's documented via their GitHub documentation and the main project site. Syzkaller has been heavily developed over the past nearly two years while Syzbot is the more recent effort.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi, Tizen and Android/Eelo

Filed under
Android
Linux
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Linux Kernel: Linux 4.14.14, Linux 4.9.77, Linux 4.4.112 and Linux 3.18.92

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Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE: Alberto Bullo

I started using Linux few years ago out of curiosity when my old computer started to get slow and wanted to try something lighter. At the time, I had a disk of Fedora lying around from a conference and managed to get it installed and working. Since then, I started using it for everyday tasks to get more familiar with the alternative software. I really liked the fact that I could select any distro I wanted and have full control of the operating system. I also used Linux for university projects and started to better understand how to use the utilities and services. Open source projects caught my attention when I started using them on my first job as they gave me the ability to adjust the features and code to my needs but also to contribute back to the community. I then started visiting open source conferences to get more involved and became a big fan of the initiative. Read more

RF-enabled Raspberry Pi add-on brings Google Assistant to gizmos, speakers, and robots

JOY-iT and Elector have launched a $42 “Talking Pi” RPi add-on that enables Google Home/AIY compatible voice activation of home automation devices linked to the Pi’s GPIO, and includes a mic board, PWM servo controls, and support for a 433MHz SRD radio. Elektor has begun selling a $42, open source voice control add-on board that is programmable via the Google Assistant SDK. Built by Germany based JOY-iT, and marketed by Conrad Business Supplies, the RF-enabled Talking Pi enables voice control of home automation equipment such as smart lights, power sockets, and other gizmos via addressable extensions to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO. Read more

How To Install Windows 10 In Virtualbox On Linux

​You might be a developer and just want to try out your application in a Windows environment, or just want the thrill of doing something in Windows 10. Well, the solution might be as easy as using Virtualbox to install windows 10 unlike installing it on your machine, which may bring may problems to your Linux installation such as grub being overwritten. Read
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