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UBOS Beta 14: support for data disks and more

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Just in time for the Let’s Self-host Installathon at Linuxfest NorthWest in Bellingham, WA, UBOS beta 14 is out!

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The Linux Kernel Might Drop Memory Protection Extensions Support

Filed under
Linux
Security

Yesterday I wrote about GCC developers moving to drop Intel MPX support and now the Linux kernel developers are looking at dropping the Memory Protection Extensions support too, thereby rendering this modern CPU feature unsupported by Linux.

Memory Protection Extensions is a security feature present since Skylake for checking pointer references at run-time to avoid buffer overflows. MPX support requires plumbing through the kernel, compiler, run-time library, etc. But with Intel not maintaining that support too well on Linux, it looks like it will be dropped entirely. With mainline LLVM Clang not supporting MPX, with GCC dropping it means no compiler support and thus no support for this functionality short of any Intel compiler offering it.

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Should Have Installed GNU/Linux....

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Microsoft sends recycler to jail for reinstalling obsolete, licensed copies of Windows on refurbished PCs

     

    After doing everything in its power to put this amazing, brilliant, principled man in jail, Microsoft issued a statement smearing him and calling him a "counterfeiter."
     

    As JWZ puts it: "In case you've forgotten: Microsoft is still a vile garbage fire of a company."

  • Penguins in a sandbox: Google nudges Linux apps toward Chrome OS

    This indicates it's a feature aimed squarely at developers and system administrators – a world away from the education market where locked-down Chromebooks rule.

    "Signs point to other devices, even ones with ARM system-on-chips, receiving support in the future," wrote Miyamoto. "But perhaps not quite yet for 32-bit machines. There are also hints that some parts of VM functionality required to run Crostini won't be available for devices with older kernel versions."

    More may be revealed at Google's annual developer conference, I/O, starting 8 May.

  • Crostini Linux Container Apps Getting Full Native Treatment on Chromebooks

    Another day, another Crostini feature comes to light. So far, we have the Linux Terminal installer, Files app integration, and Material Design cues already rounding out the Linux app experience. As we continue to uncover clues by the day, it seems development of the Crostini Project is full steam ahead today is no different. Each clue we uncover continues to push the entire experience closer to something I believe will be delivered to developers and general users alike.

Linux Foundation: Blockchains, Node.js Foundation, and Microsoft Entryism

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • How the blockchain could secure our identities

    We’re bringing information and devices online at an unprecedented rate, raising one of the fundamental questions of our time: how do we represent ourselves in this digital world that we are creating? And, more importantly, how do we secure our identity in a digital world? We’ve heard about blockchain for currencies and smart contracts; a compelling and crucial application is in securing online identity.

  • The future of Node.js: Q&A with Mark Hinkle

    onceived in 2015, the Node.js Foundation is focused on supporting Node.js and its related modules through an open governance model. Node.js as a technology has gone through a lot of changes in the last few years, and is becoming a staple in the enterprise. It is used across industries to build applications at any scale.

    Executive Director of the Node.js Foundation, Mark Hinkle provides commentary on the growth of Node.js in general, how the Node.js Foundation works with the community and what he is most excited about this year with Node.js.

  • Extending Kubernetes API for Complex Stateful Applications using Operator [Ed: Writer "spent several years working at Microsoft in the Entertainment division and most recently in the Windows and Windows Live division." Now in Linux Foundation events, sites. A form of entryism.]
  • The Future of Kubernetes Is Serverless [Ed: Microsoft entryist in a Linux Foundation event (money buys keynote spots) promotes the illusion of "serverless". No, Kubernetes always requires a server. The Linux Foundation promotes this piece.]
  • High Availability Microsoft SQL Server in a Linux Environment [Ed: The Linux Foundation promotes Microsoft's proprietary software. Ain't that lovely? It doesn't even run on GNU/Linux but on DrawBridge.]

Linux Lite 4.0 OS Enters Beta with New Look and Feel, Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Dubbed "Diamond," based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel, the Linux Lite 4.0 operating system enters beta stages of development today to give us a first glimpse of the upcoming release, which was slated for worldwide release on June 1, 2018.

According to the developer, Linux Lite 4.0's biggest changes are both internal and visual as the operating system comes with a brand new icon and system theme, namely Papirus and Adapta, Timeshift app by default for system backups, and new, in-house built Lite applications.

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Crostini for GNU/Linux Ubiquity

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Linux Apps On Chromebooks

    Don't you sometimes wish that you could throw the entire development stack out and start again. Yes we all do, but we all also know that if we did no-one would follow us. The reasons we use the technology we do has very little to do with good engineering and nothing at all to do with good design. We sort of struggle on from where we are to get a little further down the road. It isn't even that we know what our end point is, it is more that we inch along to a slightly better place. Viewed from 1000 feet our progress must look a lot like a random walk.

  • Chrome OS will support Linux apps — with a dash of Material Design

    A commit to Chromium’s code has revealed more about Google’s plan to support Linux apps in Chrome OS with a dash of Material Design.

    Google’s annual I/O developer conference is just around the corner, and we’re starting to see the usual early hints at what to expect. We’ve known about Project Crostini, the codename for the project to bring Linux apps to Chrome, for some time — but the UI elements have remained a mystery, until now.

    The developers behind Crostini appear to have settled on the Material Design-inspired ‘Adapta’ theme for Linux. Google may choose to create its own bespoke theme which is even closer to Chrome OS, but for now, it seems this is what’s being used.

  • “Terminal” App Brings Crostini And Linux Apps One Step Closer To Chrome OS

    Developers continue to bring together bits and pieces of the still mysterious Project Crostini and this week we see more detail of what the end-user could see whenever the new feature is made available. Yesterday, Robby shared a sneak-peek as some new UI elements that will bring a Material Design feel to the container tech as well as evidence that Crostini will have access to the Files App on Chromebooks.

  • Crostini Seemingly Gaining Direct File Access In Chrome OS

    Google Chromebook owners who frequently have to work with Linux applications can attest that one of the biggest limitations of the Crostini Linux container is that it does not have direct access to the device’s file system, but it seems that this may be changing soon. The way things work now forces files generated in the Crostini container to stay there, and keeps users from using local files inside the container’s application. A workaround is available via SSH, but it can be cumbersome. A recent code commit in the Chromium repository points to Google using Crostini’s built-in SSH and a pre-built action library to create an easier solution, essentially giving Crostini file access privileges to and from the Chromebook.

Raspberry Pi-alike NanoPi K1 Plus: For $35 you get 2xRAM, 4K video, Gigabit Ethernet

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

FriendlyElec has released a $35 rival to the Raspberry Pi 3 B+, outdoing the better-known board with 2GB of memory, Gigabit Ethernet, and a more powerful GPU.

The NanoPi K1 Plus follows FriendlyElec's Nano Pi K2, released last year with similar dimensions to the Raspberry Pi 3 for $40.

The NanoPi K1 Plus shares similar specs to the Nano Pi K2 and maintains the Raspberry Pi's form factor, but offers double the RAM, Gigabit Ethernet, and 4K video playback.

The device also has the same 40-pin GPIO pin-header as the Raspberry Pi 3, so it should work with Raspberry Pi accessories and housings.

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Devices: Nintendo Switch, Kontron, LineageOS 'on' Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Tegra X1 Exploit Opens Up Nintendo Switch, Other Devices

    NVIDIA’s powerful Tegra X1 chip sits at the heart of the Nintendo Switch, along with the Google Pixel C and the NVIDIA SHIELD TV, and a new exploit called Fusée Gelée has opened the Switch up for developers and has far-reaching implications for the two Android-running Tegra X1 devices. Fusée Gelée was originally found by engineer Katherine Temkin and hacking group ReSwitched, the exploit runs at the boot level, and seemingly cannot be patched on current Nintendo Switch units. It allows for full modification of the Switch’s code, up to and including running a full GNU/Linux distribution, and will likely mean similar developments for the SHIELD TV and the Pixel C.

  • Linux-friendly Coffee Lake module supports up to 64GB DDR4

    Kontron’s “COMe-bCL6” COM Express Basic Type 6 module features Intel’s 8th Gen Core and Xeon CPUs with 4x SATA III, 4x USB 3.1, 8x PCIe, and options including a 1TB NVMe SSD, -40 to 85°C, and up to 64GB DDR4.

    Kontron has unveiled its first product based on Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors. The COMe-bCL6 joins other Coffee Lake based COM Express Basic Type 6 modules including the Congatec Conga-TS370 and Seco COMe-C08-BT6, which were announced early this month when Intel rolled out 18 Coffee Lake H-, M-, U- and T-series Intel Core and Xeon chips, as well as the more recent Data Modul EDM-COMB-CF6 and MSC Technologies MSC C6B-CFLH.

  • How to Install LineageOS on Android

    I’ve you’ve been considering giving your phone new life with a custom ROM, LineageOS is one of the most popular ones available today. Here’s everything you need to know about flashing this ROM onto your phone.

A look at Peek screen recorder for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Have you ever found yourself wanting to record something on your screen for a few moments, to show someone else?

I’m not talking videogame streaming or anything on that big of a level, but rather more the need to show someone where to find a menu item, or how to change a configuration setting, or other similar examples. If so, Peek could become your new best friend, for recording GIFs or other silent videos of what's happening on your screen.

Peek is likely the most simplistic tool I have ever used for this purpose, but I don’t say that in a bad way, if anything it makes it even more of a pleasure to work with.

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GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

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Android
GNU
Linux
Google
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Thunderbolt Networking Now Supported in Linux's NetworkManager Tool

Implemented by Intel developer Mika Westerberg last year during the development of the Linux 4.15 kernel series, Thunderbolt networking arrived for Linux-based operating systems to enable peer-to-peer (P2P) network connections where you connect two computers directly via a certified Thunderbolt cable to transfer files. But while the implementation was there in the Linux kernel, the userspace bits were missing to make Thunderbolt networking work on a standard installation of a GNU/Linux distribution. By adding a new udev rule in the NetworkManager the two developers managed to load the thunderbolt-net kernel module. Read more

Based on Enterprise Code, Tested Millions of Times: openSUSE Leap 15 released

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