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Linux

Build a $20 Computer with PINE64

Filed under
Linux

I love my Raspberry Pi, which I use for many different projects. But when I saw Kickstarter campaign for 64-bit PINE64 I could not resist, so I pre-ordered one for myself.

I wanted to play with the board and see whether I could do some home automation kind of stuff or make my Traxxas X-maxx smart. There are three editions of PINE64: 512MB, 1GB, and 2GB RAM, and I ordered the 512MB version.

The PINE64 is almost twice as big as the Raspberry Pi 2 (Figure 1), so it’s not as compact as I expected. Still, it’s a good size for a whole range of projects.

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Server Administration

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Open vSwitch Joins Linux Foundation Open Networking Ecosystem
  • Refereed Talk Deadline Approaching for Linux Plumbers Conference

    The refereed talk deadline for Linux Plumbers Conference is only a few weeks off, September 1, 2016 at 11:59PM CET. So there is still some time to get your proposals in, but time is growing short.

    Note that this year's Plumbers is co-located with Linux Kernel Summit rather than LinuxCon, so the refereed track is all Plumbers this year. We are therefore looking forward to seeing your all-Plumbers refereed-track submission!

  • What is Private Cloud?
  • Safety first: The best use of the public cloud for analytics apps and data
  • Huawei Launches Labs to Drive Open Cloud Networks

    The Cloud Open Labs are part of the vendor's All Cloud strategy to make it easier for telco operators to migrate their infrastructures to the cloud.
    Huawei is unveiling an interconnected group of laboratories that are designed to help network operators more quickly and easily embrace and deploy cloud computing solutions in their environments.

  • Data Center Architecture Lessons From Isaac Newton

    Sir Isaac Newton remains our favorite source for axiomatic laws of physics, despite giving us the language of calculus. Particularly relevant for today’s discussion is Newton's third law as formally stated: “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”

    In the cosmology of the data center, this existentially proves itself in the network whenever there are significant changes in application infrastructure and architectures. As evidence, consider the reaction to first, virtualization, and now, containerization, APIs, and microservice architectures.

    These changes, while improving speed and agility of application development and delivery, have created greater mass in the data center, essentially changing the center of gravity and pulling many network services toward it. Application-focused services like load balancing and even web application security have been pulled toward the development environment as scale and security have become a necessary component of application architectures.

    [...]

    Achieving the agility and speed necessary in the app network requires software -- virtual or containerized -- with APIs and programmatic methods of integration into the orchestration engines driving the build and release process. These components must also be scalable, but not of the same magnitude as the core network. Software solutions rule in this growing division in the data center.

Emmabuntus Debian Edition 1.0: the new story begins

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Emmabuntus Debian Edition is a nice distribution that works for the particular niche. It delivers Linux and computer enablement into remote areas of the world where computers are rare and Internet connection could be something exotic. That is why it contains "all you can eat" software in the same ISO image.

It is the reason of one of the issues I listed above as different applications may use different design styles.

However, there are some more issues mentioned above that could be solved if the team looked into the distribution polishing a bit more. Luckily, they are mostly in the design area, meaning they are very likely to be resolved in the next releases.

I remember the early version of Emmabuntus which had many similar issues at that time. Most of them are no longer in the system. Let's hope that Emmabuntus DE will follow the case.

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AMD Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • Radeon RX 460 Released, Linux Review Later This Week

    Just days after the Radeon RX 470 began shipping, the Radeon RX 460 is shipping this morning and the embargo concerning the RX 460 has expired.

    This Polaris 11 graphics card has 14 compute units, 896 stream process, 1090MHz boost clock speed with 1200MHz boost clock speed, and is rated for up to 2.2 TFLOPS of compute power. The video memory is GDDR5 on a 128-bit bus. The TDP for this graphics card is less than 75 Watts.

  • AMD GPUOpen's CodeXL 2.2 Now Supports Linux With AMDGPU-PRO

    Earlier this year AMD made CodeXL 2.0 open-source as a developer tool with GUI centered around profiling/optimizing D3D, OpenGL, and Vulkan (since CodeXL 2.1) under Windows and Linux. Today marks the release of CodeXL 2.2.

STEAMpunking Linux: The Physical Computing Stack

Filed under
Linux

I’ve been on a quest lately to add nano-Linux boards to steampunk projects. The effort has been pretty successful and it’s fun doing things like putting a Raspberry Pi into my “Conference Personality Identification Device,” which everyone recognizes as a name badge. The badge sports a 1.8-inch color TFT screen that plays little sepia toned promotional videos and an orbing tricolor LED “ozone tube.” I wear the badge to my conference tech talks and it tends to be a big hit.

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Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Review

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Linux

Now it has been approximately a month since I'm using Linux Mint 18 "Sarah". There is no doubt this distro is solid and newbie friendly. I always suggest Linux newbies start with Linux Mint as it makes easier for them to move around and learn Linux system. Sarah takes the same legacy forward with better look and user experience.

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Android and Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
  • Kernel.org Is Knocking On The Door Of My Odroid-C2

    If this ~$100 CDN tiny box pleases TLW, it’s Good Enough. When a proper video driver gets into Linus’ mainline, say, with Wayland, and distros have all the usual applications working, these things will take over. It surely blows away her old VIA box with 8 core-gHz CPU, gigabit/s networking and 2gB RAM compared to 0.4 core-gHz, 100 mbits/s, and 0.25gB RAM. We’re using files over NFS so TLW will be able to use her old desktop environment on Beast III if she wants. Otherwise, she can use the Odroid-C2 as a thick client well enough. Cost for the old ones was ~$150 CDN delivered a decade ago, with real money, not this inflated stuff. Life is good.

  • ​Google wants you to log in once on Android - with any password manager
  • Google Says Goodbye to Android Wear's 'Together' Watch Face
  • Here's an open source PC that can be a laptop, desktop or even tablet

    Would-be backers of the open-source, modular EOMA68 PC card can now support the crowdfunding campaign by purchasing several new gadgets that work with the system.

    Fund-raising for the 'Easy-on-Mother-Earth' EOMA68 PC began in July and have now reached $66,000, or just under half of the $150,000 targeted by the end of August.

    The concept, from UK firm Rhombus Tech, is designed to demonstrate that computers can be easy and cheap to fix or upgrade with a standardized PC board and 3D printable housing and components. It also hopes the modular design can cut the mountains of e-waste produced by the tech industry.

More on Linux Kernel 4.8 RC1

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Now it has been approximately a month since I'm using Linux Mint 18 "Sarah". There is not doubt this distro is solid and newbie friendly. I always suggest Linux newbies start with Linux Mint as it makes easier for them to move around and learn Linux system. Sarah takes the same legacy forward with better look and user experience.

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More in Tux Machines

NOAA Breaks Weather Apps, Slackware Updates, Valve @ 20

The LinuxCon headlines continue to dominate but, more importantly, our desktop weather apps are broken thanks to NOAA decommissioning the site. Liam Dawe looked back at 20 years of Valve and Sebastian "sebas" Kügler introduced new KDE kscreen-doctor. Slackware rolled out some updates including a rare kernel upgrade and The VAR Guy wants to hear about your first time. Read more

Android Leftovers

GNOME News

  • The future is here
    Nautilus from master, updated everyday, parallel installable, in less than 3 minutes. I cannot believe this is possible. Note that due to be sandboxed with no permission handling there are things that are not working, like opening with an application. For someone not aware of the whole platform and the Linux desktop, it’s difficult to see how many implications this bring to us and the changes that will allow in the upcoming months. This truly changes the game for GNOME (and any other desktop) as a project and platform, including 3rd party developers and companies using Linux desktops or that want to support it.
  • GUADEC’16 report
    I got a chance to attend GUADEC’16 which happened in Karlsruhe, Germany from 11 – 17 August. I stayed for the whole duration including Workshop Day, core days and the later BOF days which were very learning. I’m grateful to my mentor David Woodhouse who guided me all the time. I thank GNOME community for giving me the chance to speak at intern lightning talk and i tried my best to present my project in front of those great people. I hope to get a chance someday again to speak up. We have finished our GSoC project so i am free now to wander around to find some more places and tasks in GNOME’s huge shelter. My experience of attending GUADEC was awesome, despite being a less speaker i was very comfortable to talk and interact to people in the community. I made some new friends in the community and i came to know a lot more about it. I loved attending social events after the long day of great and motivating talks. I am thankful to the GUADEC organizers, i didn’t feel any problem for a second staying 6,000 kms away from home.
  • GUADEC 2016
    I came back from Karlsruhe last week, where GUADEC 2016 took place. It was a wonderful event. Even though it was only my second GUADEC, I felt at home in this community, meeting with old and new friends.
  • Summer Talks, PurpleEgg
    The topics were different but related: The Flock talk talked about how to make things better for a developer using Fedora Workstation as their development workstation, while the GUADEC talk was about the work we are doing to move Fedora to a model where the OS is immutable and separate from applications. A shared idea of the two talks is that your workstation is not your development environment environment. Installing development tools, language runtimes, and header files as part of your base operating system implies that every project you are developing wants the same development environment, and that simply is not the case.

Fedora News

  • UDP Failures and RNGs
  • F24-20160823 updated Live isos
    New Kernel means new set of updated lives. I am happy to release the F24-20160823 updated lives isos.
  • Curse you, Jon Masters! Why do you always have to be right!
    Long story short, Fedora 24 came out and I'm given the taste of the same medicine: the video on the ASUS is completely busted. I was able to limp along for now by using the old kernel 4.4.6-301.fc23, but come on, this is clearly a massive regression. Think anyone is there to bisect and find the culprit? Of course not. I have to do it it myself. So, how did F24 ship? Well... I didn't test beta versions, so I don't have much ground to complain.
  • Communication Anti-Patterns
  • Autocloud: What's new?
    Autocloud was released during the Fedora 23 cycle as a part of the Two Week Atomic Process. Previously, it used to listen to fedmsg for successful Koji builds. Whenever, there is a new message the AutocloudConsumer queues these message for processing. The Autocloud job service then listens to the queue, downloads the images and runs the tests using Tunir. A more detailed post about it’s release can be read here. During the Fedora 24 cycle things changed. There was a change on how the Fedora composes are built. Thanks to adamw for writing a detailed blogpost on what, why and how things changed.