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Linux

Sailfish OS at MWC 2018: A Wrap-up!

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Linux

Every year for the past 6 years we have attended Mobile World Congress alongside our community, bringing Sailfish OS to so many people’s attention by showing off new devices running the OS. We host press events packed with journalists, to illustrate to everyone how this duopoly of mobile operating systems is playing out and there is room for change. This year was no different and we brought in many new believers into the world of the only independent and alternative mobile operating system.

There were articles and event coverage on publishers like Engadget, Techcrunch, NDTV and many more major websites and publications that wrote about our adventure, latest news and how we are on our path to capture different parts of a market which is thirsty for what we have to provide.

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Meet OpenAuto, an Android Auto emulator for Raspberry Pi

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Android
Linux

In 2015, Google introduced Android Auto, a system that allows users to project certain apps from their Android smartphones onto a car's infotainment display. Android Auto's driver-friendly interface, with larger touchscreen buttons and voice commands, aims to make it easier and safer for drivers to control navigation, music, podcasts, radio, phone calls, and more while keeping their eyes on the road. Android Auto can also run as an app on an Android smartphone, enabling owners of older-model vehicles without modern head unit displays to take advantage of these features.

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Mini-ITX dev kit expands upon new i.MX8M module

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Linux

Intrinsyc announced a Mini-ITX development kit for a wireless-enabled “Open-X 8M SOM” module that runs Linux or Android 8.0 on a quad-core i.MX8M SoC.

Intrinsyc announced the Open-X 8M SOM a month ago and has now followed up with a Mini-ITX form factor Open-X 8M Development Kit built around the module. The kit includes a GbE port, dual USB 3.0 ports, M2 expansion, and more.

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Linux-driven modules and SBC tap i.MX8, i.MX8M, and iMX8X

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Linux

Phytec is prepping three PhyCore COMs based on NXP’s Cortex-A53 based i.MX8M, its -A53 and -A72 equipped i.MX8 Quad, and its -A35 based i.MX8X. Also up: an SBC based on the i.MX8M module.

Phytec has posted product pages for three PhyCore modules, all of which support Linux and offer a -40 to 85°C temperature range. The three modules, which employ three different flavors of i.MX8, include a phyCORE-i.MX 8X COM, which is the first product we’ve seen that uses the dual- or quad-core Cortex-A35 i.MX8X.

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My Linux Workstation Environment in 2018

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GNU
Linux

I’ve been wanting to make another list of the apps on my workstation since the last one but I couldn’t because I was switching between my Linux Mint and Ubuntu PCs on an almost daily basis. Now, I have settled on using one PC to work and let go of the other so I can dive right into the topic.

My distro of choice is – you guessed it, Ubuntu. I run 17.10 and am waiting to see what 18.04 will officially bring when it is released in April. “Why 17.10 and not 16.04 LTS?“, I hear you ask. Well, I have always been one to test Ubuntu’s builds and it includes the new shell, so heaven yeah!

It wouldn’t be resourceful to list every single installation on my PC so my list will regard the apps that I use the most, especially for my web development and writing jobs. For my design gigs, I mainly use a Mac and easy-to-use online tools whenever I’m away from home.

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Also: Librem laptop orders now shipping within a week

Why Classrooms Are Apple, Google and Microsoft's Next Big Battleground

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Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Google’s Chromebooks accounted for 59.6% of mobile computing shipments in the kindergarten through 12th grade market in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to Futuresource Consulting. By comparison, Windows accounted for 25.6% and iOS comprised 10.6% of shipments.

Among the reasons tech giants are scrambling to get their gadgets into schools: It’s a big business opportunity. The education technology market is expected to reach $252 billion by 2020, according to a report published by education-focused technology conference host EdTechXGlobal and advisory firm IBIS Capital. But there’s potential upside even after students leave the classroom and turn into fully-fledged consumers, too. “It gets people using your technology young,” says Avi Greengart, research director for consumer platforms and devices for GlobalData. “The hope is that they stick with it.”

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Phoenix RC Flight Controller Driver Coming For Linux 4.17

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Linux

One of several new drivers slated for Linux 4.17 is PXRC for the Phoenix RC flight controller adapters.

This is a flight controller modeled after that's used by radio control airplanes/helicopters/drones. Phoenix RC makes a PC flight simulator and for going with that software they have this controller. While there doesn't appear to be a Linux port of the Phoenix RC software that has been around for years, with Linux 4.17 at least their RC flight controllers will now work under Linux if you want to use it as an input device for another game, etc.

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Linux Foundation: AI, Blockchain/Hyperledger, and dNOS

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Linux

4MLinux A Miniature Linux Distribution

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Linux

I've always been quite a fan of minimalist/light distros. They have ability to work on many computers where others do not come. One of my recent discoveries is 4MLinux, a much smaller distro, almost a miniature of what we are accustomed to see, but able to do amazing things.

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Stable kernels 4.15.14, 4.14.31, 4.9.91 and 4.4.125

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Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

  • Rust pattern: Precise closure capture clauses
    This is the second in a series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (b) how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.
  • This Week in Rust
  • Mozilla publishes recommendations on government vulnerability disclosure in Europe
    As we’ve argued on many occasions, effective government vulnerability disclosure (GVD) review processes can greatly enhance cybersecurity for governments, citizens, and companies, and help mitigate risk in an ever-broadening cyber threat landscape. In Europe, the EU is currently discussing a new legislative proposal to enhance cybersecurity across the bloc, the so-called ‘EU Cybersecurity Act’. In that context, we’ve just published our policy recommendations for lawmakers, in which we call on the EU to seize the opportunity to set a global policy norm for government vulnerability disclosure.
  • Testing Strategies for React and Redux
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – April 20th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, micde, Jarrod Michell, Thomas Brooks.
  • Supporting Same-Site Cookies in Firefox 60
    Firefox 60 will introduce support for the same-site cookie attribute, which allows developers to gain more control over cookies. Since browsers will include cookies with every request to a website, most sites rely on this mechanism to determine whether users are logged in. Attackers can abuse the fact that cookies are automatically sent with every request to force a user to perform unwanted actions on the site where they are currently logged in. Such attacks, known as cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), allow attackers who control third-party code to perform fraudulent actions on the user’s behalf. Unfortunately current web architecture does not allow web applications to reliably distinguish between actions initiated by the user and those that are initiated by any of the third-party gadgets or scripts that they rely on.
  • Enterprise Policy Support in Firefox
    Last year, Mozilla ran a survey to find out top enterprise requirements for Firefox. Policy management (especially Windows Group Policy) was at the top of that list. For the past few months we’ve been working to build that support into Firefox in the form of a policy engine. The policy engine adds desktop configuration and customization features for enterprise users to Firefox. It works with any tool that wants to set policies including Windows Group Policy.
  • any.js
    Thanks to Ms2ger web-platform-tests is now even more awesome (not in the American sense). To avoid writing HTML boilerplate, web-platform-tests supports .window.js, .worker.js, and .any.js resources, for writing JavaScript that needs to run in a window, dedicated worker, or both at once. I very much recommend using these resource formats as they ease writing and reviewing tests and ensure APIs get tested across globals.
  • Alex Gibson: My fifth year working at Mozilla
    Today marks my fifth year working for Mozilla! This past year has been both fun and frantic, and overall was a really good year for both Mozilla and Firefox. Here’s a run down a few of the things I got to work on.

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28
    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.
  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update
    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

Android Leftovers

Configuring local storage in Linux with Stratis

Configuring local storage is something desktop Linux users do very infrequently—maybe only once, during installation. Linux storage tech moves slowly, and many storage tools used 20 years ago are still used regularly today. But some things have improved since then. Why aren't people taking advantage of these new capabilities? This article is about Stratis, a new project that aims to bring storage advances to all Linux users, from the simple laptop single SSD to a hundred-disk array. Linux has the capabilities, but its lack of an easy-to-use solution has hindered widespread adoption. Stratis's goal is to make Linux's advanced storage features accessible. Read more