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Solus Is Now Officially a Rolling Release Linux Operating System

Filed under
OS
Linux

It looks like the "This Week in Solus" weekly newsletter are a thing again, and this is the second week in a row Solus developer Joshua Strobl announces a new installation to keep the community updated with the latest innovations.

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Recycle and reuse your old computers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As I am sure you have heard me mention before, Linux is free to download and install as there is no licence fee. There are also many different distributions available, some of which have been specifically designed to work on old or low powered hardware. With the added bonus that malware is virtually non-existent on Linux (it really is secure), it means you can turn your old PC that was gathering dust into a working machine that is also safer to use than before.

A lot of Linux distributions come with software preloaded, so you can be up and running in no time. Ubuntu for instance comes with LibreOffice and Thunderbird preloaded, which means all of your office and email needs are sorted without you having to worry about additional downloads, or forking out on some third party product.

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New to Linux? HandyLinux Is a Great Distro for Linux Newbies

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Linux

HandyLinux offers a simplified approach for those who are new to the Linux desktop operating system. The developers make it easy to peal off the “Handy” layers to reveal a more standard Linux environment as users learn the system. Those who no longer need the IT tools included with the initial installation can remove them easily using the Handy2Debian application from the main menu.

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Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Kernel 4.6.3 Has Been Released

    Because it is very difficult to compile a Linux kernel, Canonical has packed all the kernel releases as deb packages and made them available for everybody that uses Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based systems, via its kernel.ubuntu.com repository.

  • X Developer Keith Packard's ChaosKey Hardware RNG Is Almost Here

    Veteran X.Org/X developer Keith Packard along with well known open-source advocate Bdale Garbee have been working on an "inexpensive yet robust" USB-based hardware random number generator.

    After years of work on this USB hardware RNG, they finally have a device they are taking into production: ChaosKey v1.0. There's already the mainline ChaosKey driver for supporting this true random number generator and the device itself is also open-source. ChaosKey 1.0 was presented at this week's DebConf16 Debian conference in Cape Town.

  • Trying The Experimental Radeon RX 480 Overclocking With AMDGPU OverDrive Isn't Going So Well
  • Mesa Is Almost Back Up To 1.9 Million Lines Of Code

    Being half-way through the year now and also given the recent Mesa 12.0 release I decided to run some Git statistics on Mesa to see how this year is panning out for its development.

    As of this morning, Mesa is at 5115 files that together have a total of 1,879,768 lines of code. There have been 83,063 recorded commits from 723 different authors / email addresses.

HandyLinux Is a Great Toolbox for Linux Newbies

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

HandyLinux is just that. It is a handy Linux distro that is very welcoming to Linux newbies. However, its dumbed-down handling of the Xfce desktop environment will leave more experienced Linux users craving for something a bit more advanced.

The developers have to standardize their use of English in the English language version. Too many slips into French detract from the attractiveness of this distro for English-only users. Looks can be deceiving, though. HandyLinux performs admirably.

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What If Linux Users Made Movies!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

I am just trying to imagine a few movies made by Linux lovers and for Linux loving audience. If such thing happens, what would be the movies look like? What would be their title?

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Tiny Core Linux 7.2 Released With New Features — A Blazing Fast 16MB Linux Distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Core Project has recently announced the release of Tiny Core Linux 7.2. Tiny Core Linux is one of the smallest operating systems based on Linux kernel. TinyCore, the operating system’s popular version, is just 16MB in size and comes with a simple and fast GUI.

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TeamViewer Alternatives for Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you follow tech news at all, you’ve heard about “the happening” over at TeamViewer and of the “stuff” the victims of this exploit inadvertently purchased for the bad guys. Now, some of you might be thinking that this is old news. After all, this was like a month ago. What’s in the past stays in the past – wrong.

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Kernel Space Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Radeon/AMDGPU Updates For The Linux 4.8 Kernel

    Alex Deucher has submitted the main feature pull request for DRM-Next of the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver changes for the next kernel cycle, Linux 4.8.

    Some will be sad though, the AMDGPU material for Linux 4.8 doesn't contain the huge DAL display abstraction layer code that's needed for bringing the open-source AMDGPU driver display capabilities more on par with the former closed-source driver stack and also necessary for supporting new features like FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync.

  • Wayland Founder Kristian Høgsberg Is The Latest Open-Source Developer Leaving Intel

    Sadly, another blow to report on with regard to Intel's open-source efforts... Just days after reporting on Intel losing its chief Linux/open-source technologist, Dirk Hohndel, there's another high profile departure in the open-source world.

  • Mesa 12.0 Released With OpenGL 4.3 Support, Intel Vulkan & Many Other Features

    While it's coming late, the huge Mesa 12.0 release is now official! Mesa 12.0 is easily one of the biggest updates to this important open-source user-space OpenGL driver stack in quite some time and will offer much better support and features especially for Intel, Radeon, and NVIDIA open-source Linux desktop users/gamers.

  • Mesa 12.0.0 3D Graphics Library Released with Vulkan Driver for Intel Hardware

    Today, July 8, 2016, Collabora's Emil Velikov has had the honor of announcing the release of the final Mesa 12.0.0 3D Graphics Library for all GNU/Linux operating systems.

World’s smallest quad-core SBC starts at $8

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyARM launched an $8 open-spec, 40 x 40mm “NanoPi Neo” SBC that runs Ubuntu Core on a quad-core Allwinner H3. It’s Ethernet-ready, but headless.

With the NanoPi Neo, FriendlyARM has released what appears to be the world’s smallest quad-core ARM based single-board computer, and one of the smallest ARM SBCs we’ve seen. This open spec, 40 x 40mm sibling to the $11, 69 × 48mm NanoPi M1 has the same 1.2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 SoC with 600MHz Mali 400MP2 GPU, and the higher-end, $10 model has the same 512MB of DDR3 RAM. However, in order to slim down, the Neo sacrifices the HDMI port, the camera and CVBS interfaces, DC jack, and Raspberry Pi compatible expansion connector.

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Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more