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Linux 4.8.4

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I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.4 kernel. And yeah, sorry about
the quicker releases, I'll be away tomorrow and as they seem to have
passed all of the normal testing, I figured it would be better to get
them out earlier instead of later. And I like releasing stuff on this
date every year...

All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at:
git:// linux-4.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal git web browser:

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Also: Linux 4.7.10

Linux 4.4.27

New Releases: Budgie, Solus, SalentOS, and Slackel

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  • Open-Source Budgie Desktop Sees New Release

    The pet parakeet of the Linux world, Budgie has a new release available for download. in this post we lookout what's new and tell you how you can get it.

  • Solus Linux Making Performance Gains With Its BLAS Configuration

    Those making use of the promising Solus Linux distribution will soon find their BLAS-based workloads are faster.

    Solus developer Peter O'Connor tweeted this week that he's found some issues with the BLAS linking on the distribution and he's made fixes for Solus. He also mentioned that he uncovered these BLAS issues by using our Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.

  • SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0 released!

    With great pleasure the team announces the release of SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0.

  • Slackel "Live kde" 4.14.21

    This release is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, while the 64-bit iso supports booting on UEFI systems.
    The 64-bit iso images support booting on UEFI systems.
    The 32-bit iso images support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems.
    Iso images are isohybrid.

Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • Intel Has Been Working On MIPI SoundWire Support For Linux

    An Intel developer has published testing patches for providing a SoundWire bus driver within the Linux kernel, which implements the MIPI SoundWire 1.1 specification.

    For those unfamiliar with SoundWire as was I when coming across these patches, "The SoundWire protocol is a robust, scalable, low complexity, low power, low latency, two-pin (clock and data) multi-drop bus that allows for the transfer of multiple audio streams and embedded control/commands. SoundWire provides synchronization capabilities and supports both PCM and PDM, multichannel data, isochronous and asynchronous modes. SoundWire does borrow a number of concepts from existing interfaces such as HDAudio, AC97, SLIMbus, which already provide control/audio on the same wires, or legacy interfaces such as I2C/I2S, TDM, PDM."

  • Linux Perf Gets New "C2C" Tool For False Sharing Detection

    The perf code for Linux 4.10 is set to receive a new "c2c" tool.

    The C2C tool within the perf subsystem is aimed to track down cacheline contention and has already been used by developers in tracking down false sharing of large applications, readers/writes to cachelines, and related information to assist NUMA shared-memory applications.

  • OOPS! Sometimes Even Linus Gets It Wrong!
  • OpenTracing: Turning the Lights On for Microservices

    Those building microservices at scale understand the role and importance of distributed tracing: after all, it’s the most direct way to understand how and why complex systems misbehave. When we deployed Dapper at Google in 2005, it was like someone finally turned the lights on: everything from ordinary programming errors to broken caches to bad network hardware to unknown dependencies came into plain view.

  • Linux Foundation Spurs JavaScript Development

Yocto driven camera design taps octa-core Snapdragon

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Qualcomm and Thundercomm unveiled a Linux-supported, 4K camera reference design with an octa-core Snapdragon 625 and video analytics software.

Qualcomm and hardware partner Thundercomm Technology announced an IP Connected Camera reference design called the Snapdragon 625 IP Camera built around its 14nm-fabricated, octa-core Cortex-A53 Snapdragon 625 system-on-chip. This is Qualcomm’s first Connected Camera design to support Linux instead of Android.

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Renesas spins 3rd Gen automotive starter kits, adds new M3 SoC

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Renesas has launched two Linux-ready R-Car starter kits optimized for AGL and GENIVI: an R-Car H3 based “Premier” and a “Pro” with a lower-end M3 SoC.

Later this month, Renesas will begin selling two third-generation starter kits for its 64-bit ARM-based R-Car automotive SoCs. The kits are designed for ADAS, infotainment, reconfigurable digital clusters, and integrated digital cockpits.

The two kits are optimized for open source Linux standards like Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) and GENIVI, but they also support QNX. Earlier R-Car automotive starter kits include last year’s R-Car H2 ADAS Starter Kit, based on its earlier H2 automotive SoC.

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Linux/FOSS Events

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  • FOSDEM Desktops DevRoom 2016 all for Participation

    FOSDEM is one of the largest (5,000+ hackers!) gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium, Europe).

    Once again, one of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks.

    We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

  • LatinoWare

    Yesterday, Wednesday 19 oct, was the first day of LatinoWare thirteen edition hosted in the city of Foz do Iguaçu in Parana state with presence of 5155 participants and temperature of 36ºC. Currently this is the biggest event of free software in Brazil.

  • Attending a FUDcon LATAM 2016

    From my experience I will share my days at FUDcon 2016 held on Puno last week. There were 3 core days, and 2 more days to visit around.

Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Patches Updated For Linux 4.9

    Intel has updated its currently out-of-tree Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0 patches for compatibility against the Linux 4.9-rc1 kernel plus made other improvements to the code.

    These patches have been worked on the past few months after Intel PR initially claimed no TBM 3.0 Linux support. The patches have gone through several public revisions but sadly didn't make it for integration into the mainline Linux 4.9 kernel.

  • Linux 4.9 Is Showing A Performance Boost On More Systems

    Earlier this week I posted some benchmarks of a Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system seeing performance boosts under Linux 4.9 and it turns out it's looking more widespread than just affecting a niche system or two. When testing a more traditional Intel Haswell desktop, Linux 4.9 Git is seeing more wins over Linux 4.8 and 4.7 kernels.

    Following that earlier 4.9 Git benchmarking I set out to do a fairly large Linux kernel comparison on a Haswell system to go back three or so years worth of kernel releases. That big kernel comparison will be finished up and posted in the days ahead, but already from this Core i7 4790K Devil's Canyon system I am seeing some performance improvements with 4.9 Git to share over 4.7.0 and 4.8.0 stock kernels...

  • Linux Foundation Welcomes JavaScript Community

    Kris Borchers, executive director of the foundation, announced the news, saying that the JavaScript Foundation aims "to support a vast array of technologies that complement projects throughout the entire JavaScript ecosystem."

    This includes both client and server side application libraries, mobile application testing frameworks, and JavaScript engines.

    All jQuery Foundation projects will also be united within the JS Foundation including jQuery, Lodash, ESLint, Esprima, Grunt, RequireJS, jQuery UI, Globalize, Sizzle, Jed, and Dojo.

Patten: How to exorcise Windows from your old computer

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You may have heard of Linux (also known as GNU/Linux), but only as something that hackers use. It has a reputation for being unwieldy and hard. That reputation is deserved … sometimes.

But anyone can learn it. And if it’s good enough for Barbie, it should be good enough for you.

The best part: It’s free, free, free.

Linux is actually a kind of operating system, just as a mammal is a kind of animal. Linux systems are all similar or identical at the core (also known as the kernel). But they come in a lot of varieties, or distros. (Fun fact: Much of the Android operating system is based on Linux.)

The hard part about Linux isn’t learning. It’s choosing.

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Also: Kodi-fying an old computer

CVE-2016-5195 Patched

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  • Linux Kernels 4.8.3, 4.7.9 & 4.4.26 LTS Out to Patch "Dirty COW" Security Flaw

    Today, October 20, 2016, Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced three new maintenance updates for the Linux 4.8, 4.7, and 4.4 LTS kernel series, patching a major security vulnerability.

    Known as "Dirty COW," the Linux kernel vulnerability documented at CVE-2016-5195 is, in fact, a nasty bug that could have allowed local users to write to any file they can read. The worst part is that the security flaw was present in various Linux kernel builds since at least the Linux 2.6.x series, which reached end of life in February this year.

  • Canonical Patches Ancient "Dirty COW" Kernel Bug in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

    As reported earlier, three new Linux kernel maintenance releases arrived for various Linux-based operating systems, patching a critical and ancient bug popularly known as "Dirty COW."

    We already told you that the kernel vulnerability could be used by a local attacker to run programs as an administrator, and it looks like it also affects all supported Ubuntu releases, including Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), as well as all of their official or unofficial derivatives running the same kernel builds.

Mad Max Now on GNU/Linux

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  • Mad Max Open World Action-Adventure Video Game Released for Linux, SteamOS & Mac

    After teasing us earlier this month, today, October 20, 2016, Feral Interactive had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the Mad Max open world action-adventure video game for the SteamOS, Linux, and Mac platforms.

    Feral Interactive is well known for bringing AAA titles to the Linux and Mac gaming world, and after porting the Tomb Raider 2013 reboot last year to our beloved platforms, which continue to get more fans by the day, now the UK-based video games publisher delights us with the superb Mad Max title developed by Avalanche Studios and published by Warner Bros.

  • Mad Max Launches For Linux

    Feral Interactive's port of Mad Max to Linux (and macOS) is now officially out and can be found on Steam.

    Feral announced their Mad Max port at the beginning of October while today it's ready to ship. As mentioned in that original article, the Linux system requirements are fairly stiff with only listing NVIDIA hardware under Linux and the minimum being a GTX 660 while the recommendation is at least a GTX 970.

  • Mad Max Appears To Work Fine With RadeonSI Gallium3D

    This morning's release of the Mad Max game for Linux lists only NVIDIA graphics as supported, but it does turn out at least for newer AMD GPUs using the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver things should work -- well, assuming you are using the latest open-source driver code.

  • Mad Max released for Linux, port report and review available

    Mad Max is the latest Linux port from Feral Interactive, probably one of the titles I have been most excited about so hopefully it lives up to the promise.

    It has only been a few weeks since Feral Interactive released Dawn of War II, Chaos Rising and Retribution on Linux, and now we have a real whopper with Mad Max.

    Something Linux lacks is a reasonable amount of high quality open-world story-based games. We started getting a few with Borderlands 2 and Shadow of Mordor, but another top quality game like this is a must for us to keep the interest up.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.