Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

Last month Samsung introduced the 970 Series solid-state drives with the mainstream 970 EVO models and 970 PRO models for professionals/enthusiasts. The 970 Series moves to a 64-layer flash and uses a five-core Phoenix controller. For those curious about the Samsung 970 EVO performance under Linux, I have carried out some quick benchmarks to show off its potential under Ubuntu.

Read more

Automation controller upgraded with new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Filed under
Linux

Techbase has upgraded its Linux-powered ModBerry M500 controller with the RPi 3 Model B+ SBC, advancing to a 1.4GHz SoC, GbE, and dual-band WiFi-ac. The launch follows several new NanoPi and Orange Pi based ModBerry M300 models.

Techbase announced the availability of a new version of its ModBerry M500 industrial control computer (also called the ModBerry NPE M500), which advances from the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B to the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ SBC. The updated ModBerry M500 offers a more powerful, feature-rich alternative to the ModBerry 500, which is based on the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3), as well as the ModBerry 500 M3, which combines the RPi 3-like CM3 with an ESP32 module.

Read more

Desktop: Themes, Plasma, GNOME Boxes, Mageia, Fedora and Voice Chat Software for Linux Gaming

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Top 30 Best Ubuntu Themes That Will Blow Your Mind

    Over the last year, we covered different themes for Ubuntu; most of them being GTK themes inspired by material design and flat design. It has been a while since our last theme article and I figure today will be a day to present you with a somewhat mega list.

    My compilation includes a few themes already featured on FossMint together with others you probably haven’t heard about yet. If you are keen on personalization and UI beauty then I’m sure that my compilation will blow your mind.

  • Release AnnouncementsPlasma 5.13.0
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Now Available, OpenGear's New NetOps Automation Platform, New Zynthian Raspberry Pi Synthesizer and More

    KDE released Plasma 5.13.0 today. The team has "spent the last four months optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance and less memory consumption. Basic features like panel popups were optimised to make sure they run smoothly even on the lowest-end hardware. Our design teams have not rested either, producing beautiful new integrated lock and login screen graphics." New features in Plasma 5.13 include Plasma Browser Integration, redesigned system settings, new look for lock and login screens, improved KWin graphics compositor and more. See the release announcement for links to download pages for live images, distro packages and source.

  • Contributing to Boxes

    I have to admit that Boxes is a bit late for the Flatpak party, but that’s not a problem. The technical difficulties of getting a virtualization hypervisor to run inside the flatpak sandbox are mostly overcomed. This way, contributing to Boxes has never been easier.

    In the following sections I will describe the step-by-step process of making your first code contribution to GNOME Boxes.

  • Mageia at RMLL – and a roundup

    RMLL  (also known as LSM, Libre Software Meeting) is one of Mageia’s important annual events and 2018 is no different. It’s the premier world meeting for Libre Software, upon the principles of which our distro and our community is based.

    This year RMLL is to be held in in Strasbourg, and we have a booth! We’re calling for people to come and spend a little time on the stand, or a lot of time if you have a lot – we need Mageians to come talk to people about our distro, and encourage them to try us out, join the community and contribute in any way they want. It’s also a great opportunity to meet a wide variety of people in the Libre Software community, both developers and users, and catch up on what’s happening in our world.

  • GLPI version 9.3

    GLPI (Free IT and asset management software) version 9.3~RC2 is available. RPM are available in remi-glpi93 repository for Fedora ≥ 25 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6.

  • Best Free Voice Chat Software for Linux Gaming

    It’s estimated that more than 1.4 billion people play computer games, with about 750 million of them participating in online gaming. That’s a colossal market for Linux to tap. The design of online games is diverse, ranging from simple text-based environments to the incorporation of complex graphics and immersive virtual worlds.

    Although gamers rely on their keyboards, communicating with fellow players with the keyboard is often arduous, and an unnecessary distraction when in-game. While shortcut keys can streamline communicating, nothing compares to the convenience of being able to talk into a headset, and share messages in real time.

Linux: NOVA Filesystem, Systemd 239, LF Deep Learning Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • New NOVA Filesystem

    Andiry Xu (working with Lu Zhang, Steven Swanson and others) posted patches for a new filesystem called NOVA (NOn-Volatile memory Accelerated). Normal RAM chips are wiped every time you turn off your computer. Non-volatile RAM retains its data across reboots. Their project targeted byte-addressable non-volatile memory chips, such as Intel's 3DXpoint DIMMs. Andiry said that the current incarnation of their code was able to do a lot already, but they still had a big to-do list, and they wanted feedback from the kernel people.

    Theodore Y. Ts'o gave the patches a try, but he found that they wouldn't even compile without some fixes, which he posted in reply. Andiry said they'd adapt those fixes into their patches.

    The last time NOVA made an appearance on the kernel mailing list was August 2017, when Steven made a similar announcement. This time around, they posted a lot more patches, including support for SysFS controls, Kconfig compilation options and a significant amount of documentation.

  • Systemd 239 Is Being Prepped For Release With Many Changes

    Systemd developers have begun wrangling the v239 release together. Among the features coming are a change where the network interface device naming may now be different (though it seems to primarily affect SR-IOV/NPAR situations), support for using the RestrictNamespaces property multiple times, the sd-boot systemd boot functionality has new configuration settings so you can turn off Windows/macOS partition discovery, sd-boot should now pick a better screen resolution when booting a HiDPI system, systemd-resolve has been renamed to resolvectl, a NoNewPrivileges property has been added to turn off acquiring of new privileges system-wide, swap files should now work for hibernation now, networkd now automatically uses the kernel's route expiration feature, documentation improvements, and many other changes.

  • LF Deep Learning Foundation Announces Project Contribution Process

    I am very pleased to announce that the LF Deep Learning Foundation has approved a project lifecycle and contribution process to enable the contribution, support and growth of artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects. With these documents in place, the LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

    The LF Deep Learning Foundation, a community umbrella project of The Linux Foundation with the mission of supporting artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects, is working to build a self-sustaining ecosystem of projects. Having a clear roadmap for how to contribute projects is a first step. Contributed projects operate under their own technical governance with collaboration resources allocated and provided by the LF Deep Learning Foundation’s Governing Board. Membership in the LF Deep Learning Foundation is not required to propose a project contribution.

Intel in Linux 4.19 and MIPS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Begins Queuing Graphics Driver Improvements For Linux 4.19

    While the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window isn't even over until the end of the week followed by about eight weeks worth of testing before that kernel version will debut as stable, Intel open-source developers have already sent in their first pull request to DRM-Next of material they would like to begin staging for Linux 4.19.

    Intel's OTC developers are usually quite punctual in queuing up their tested work in DRM-Next for the next kernel cycle while even for their standards this is quite early with there being several days left to the current merge window.

  • Linux Kernel Patches Appear For A Line Of Intel MIPS SoCs

    It appears Intel is launching a line of SoCs based on the MIPS architecture.

    Hitting the kernel mailing list overnight is a set of kernel patches for bringing up the Intel GRX500 SoCs, which are based on the MIPS interAptiv design. MIPS interAptiv processor cores are based on a 32-bit, multi-core design and have been available the past few years. Background information on interAptiv is available from MIPS.com.

Linux Kernel 4.17 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Is Out

Filed under
Linux

Even if it's a small one changing only 23 files, with 131 insertions and 68 deletions, the Linux kernel 4.17.1 point release marks the Linux 4.17 kernel series as ready for mass deployments, which means that OS vendors can now start compiling it for their supported architectures and GNU/Linux operating systems to distribute the new kernel version to their users.

"I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.1 kernel. All users of the 4.17 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.17.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.17.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux stable.git;a=summary," said Greg Kroah-Hartman in the mailing list announcement.

Read more

Stable kernels 4.17.1, 4.16.15 and 4.14.49

Filed under
Linux

Zynthian Open Source Raspberry Pi Synthesiser

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Musicians may be interested in a new fully open source Raspberry Pi synthesiser aptly named the Zynthian which provides a “new class of machine” described as a “swiss army knife of synthesis, equipped with multiple engines, filters and effects”. The Raspberry Pi synthesiser is completely configurable and upgradable and offers an open platform for Sound Synthesis based on the awesome Raspberry Pi mini PC and Linux operating system making the synthesiser fully hackable.

Read more

Kernel: Linux Kernel 4.17, Linux 4.18 and Mesa

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel 4.17 Now Ready for Mass Deployments as First Point Release Is Out

    Just a little over a week after the release of the Linux 4.17 kernel series, renowned kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today the availability of the first point release, Linux kernel 4.17.1.

    Even if it's a small one changing only 23 files, with 131 insertions and 68 deletions, the Linux kernel 4.17.1 point release marks the Linux 4.17 kernel series as ready for mass deployments, which means that OS vendors can now start compiling it for their supported architectures and GNU/Linux operating systems to distribute the new kernel version to their users.

    "I'm announcing the release of the 4.17.1 kernel. All users of the 4.17 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.17.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.17.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux stable.git;a=summary," said Greg Kroah-Hartman in the mailing list announcement.

  • Linux 4.18 Supports The Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 & DT For NES Classic Edition, Steam Link

    The ARM SoC/platform changes have been submitted and already pulled into the merge window for the Linux 4.18 kernel.

    The ARM hardware support this time is quite exciting. With the Linux 4.18 kernel there is now initial mainline support for the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 high-end SoC and on the board front are the initial additions for supporting the Steam Link and the Nintendo NES Classic Edition.

  • DRM Leasing / Display Patches Updated For Mesa's Vulkan Drivers

    Keith Packard's patches for improving the Linux infrastructure around VR HMD devices have landed within the mainline Linux kernel as well as in X.Org Server 1.20, but for rounding out the work, there still are pending patches for the Mesa Vulkan drivers.

    Keith has spent more than one year working on allowing "DRM leasing", non-desktop handling for virtual reality head-mounted displays, and other related improvements to better embrace HMDs on the Linux graphics stack for optimal performance. The patches for the Vulkan DRM leasing though have yet to be merged into Mesa.

F2FS in Linux 4.18, Netconf 2018, Linux Foundation Groups and Events

Filed under
Linux
  • f2fs update for 4.18-rc1

    So sorry for a bit late pull request. I had to take a look at the test results run during the weekend. Could you please consider this?

  • F2FS File-System Gets Discard Improvements, Nobarrier Fsync Mode For Linux 4.18

    Flash-Friendly File-System (F2FS) maintainer Jaegeuk Kim has submitted the file-system updates intended for the Linux 4.18 kernel.

  • HERE, Airbiquity, Bose and more join Automotive Grade Linux open source project

    The Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) project, an open source collaborative program bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies, has welcomed a number of new members which brings it to over 120. The latest to join are Abalta Technologies, Airbiquity, Bose, EPAM Systems, HERE, Integrated Computer Solutions and Sitech Electric Automotive.

    Dan Cauchy, executive director of AGL at the Linux Foundation, said in a statement: “Our newest members include the some of the industry leaders in embedded, software and automotive technologies from all over the world, including our first Chinese automaker. We look forward to leveraging the expertise of these members as we continue to enhance our infotainment platform and build out functionalities like vehicle-to-cloud connectivity and virtualization.”

  • More Firms Join Open Source Networking Group

    More communications firms are coming onboard with the open source networking organization launched earlier this year by The Linux Foundation.

    That organization, called LF Networking Fund (LFN), recently welcomed KDDI, KT, SK Telecom, Sprint, Swisscom and Telecom Italia into its fold.

    LFN coalesces six top networking projects to increase harmonization across platforms, communities and ecosystems, according to its site. The organization says it seeks to address major industry challenges through collaboration between end users, vendors and developers, who can work together to transform all aspects of the network and accelerate open source deployments.

  • Open Source Summit North America Fosters Exchange of Ideas

    All the way back in 1991, when some of you were working at your first IT jobs, others were still in high school, and still others hadn't even been born yet, a student named Linus Torvalds attending the University of Helsinki in Finland took an interest in computer operating systems and began writing his own OS kernel.

     

    Today, we have penguins, the backbone of the modern internet, and so many different distributions of the original Linux that we could read them off one by one and plausibly pretend to be listing famous pirates (Yellow Dog, Red Flag, Jarro Negro), Greek mythological monsters (Xandros, Sidux, Tanglu), ancient Roman senators (Canaima, Matriux, Maemo), obscure Marvel Comics characters (Liquid Lemur, Estrella Roja, Evil Entity), or even visitors form a neighboring galaxy (KaarPux, NuTyX, Kororaa, Papug).

  • Coverage of Netconf 2018

    Netconf, the Linux kernel networking development conference, has provided coverage of this year's event, which was held in Boston, MA, May 31-June 1.

  • Netconf 2018 Day 1

    The two day Linux kernel networking development plenary session, called Netconf was held in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 31st and June 1st 2018. Covered here is day one of the sessions, attended by 15 developers.

  • Netconf 2018 Day 2
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

EXT4 fscrypt vs. eCryptfs vs. LUKS dm-crypt Benchmarks

Given the recent advancements of the EXT4 file-system with its native file-system encryption support provided by the fscrypt framework, here are benchmarks comparing the performance of an EXT4 file-system with no encryption, fscrypt-based encryption, eCryptfs-based encryption, and a LUKS dm-crypt encrypted volume. Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" Has Reached End of Security Support, Upgrade Now

Released more than three years ago, on April 25, 2015, Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" is currently considered the "oldstable" Debian branch since the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series precisely a year ago, on June 17, 2017. As such, Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" has now reached end of life and will no longer receive regular security support beginning June 17, 2018. Security support for Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" will be handed over to the Debian LTS team now that LTS (Long Term Support) support has ended for Debian GNU/Linux 7 "Wheezy" on May 31, 2018. Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" will start receiving additional support from the Debian LTS project starting today, but only for a limited number of packages and architectures like i386, amd64, armel, and armhf. Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers