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Linux

Tiny Core Linux 7.2 Enters Development, First Release Candidate Is Out Now

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GNU
Linux

The developers of one of the smallest GNU/Linux operating systems, Tiny Core, have announced that the next point release in the Tiny Core Linux 7 series, version 7.2, is now open for development.

Tiny Core Linux 7.2 RC1 (Release Candidate 1) has been released today, June 25, 2016, and it lets early adopters and public testers get an early taste of what's coming to the final Tiny Core Linux 7.2 operating system in the coming weeks.

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New Kernel Releases

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Linux

Tizen News

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Linux

IT runs on the cloud, and the cloud runs on Linux. Any questions?

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GNU
Linux
Server

A recent survey by the Uptime Institute of 1,000 IT executives found that 50 percent of senior enterprise IT executives expect the majority of IT workloads to reside off-premise in cloud or colocation sites in the future. Of those surveyed, 23 percent expect the shift to happen next year, and 70 percent expect that shift to occur within the next four years.

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Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

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Linux

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion.

You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close.

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DAISY: A Linux-compatible text format for the visually impaired

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GNU
Linux
Software

If you're blind or visually impaired like I am, you usually require various levels of hardware or software to do things that people who can see take for granted. One among these is specialized formats for reading print books: Braille (if you know how to read it) or specialized text formats such as DAISY.

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Linux Kernel 4.6.3 Has Multiple Networking Improvements, Better SPARC Support

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Linux
Security

Today, June 24, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the general availability of the third maintenance release for the Linux 4.6 kernel series.

Linux kernel 4.6.3 is here two weeks after the release of the second maintenance update in the series, Linux kernel 4.6.2, to change a total of 88 files, with 1302 insertions and 967 deletions. Unfortunately, very few GNU/Linux distributions have adopted the Linux 4.6 series, despite the fact that Greg Kroah-Hartman urged everyone to move to this most advanced kernel branch as soon as possible from Linux 4.5, which reached end of life.

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Linux and Linux Foundation

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Linux

Peppermint OS 7 Linux Distribution Officially Released Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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GNU
Linux

It's a bit earlier than expected, but the Peppermint OS 7 GNU/Linux distribution has been officially unveiled today, June 24, 2016, based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

Peppermint OS 7 has been in development for the past year, and it comes as a drop-in replacement for the Peppermint Six version, which was officially released back in May 2015. It is distributed as 64-bit and 32-bit flavors for all computers, but the 64-bit one also offers complete support for UEFI/Secureboot systems.

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GNU/Linux on Servers and PS3

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GNU
Linux
Server
  • Nearly 1 in 3 Azure virtual machines now run Linux
  • What a Virtual Network Looks Like: Planning

    Network services don't spring up unbidden from the earth but rather they're coerced out of infrastructure in response to business and consumer opportunities. Every operations and management paradigm ever proposed for networking includes an explicit planning dimension to get the service-to-infrastructure and service-to-user relationships right. On the surface, virtualization would seem to help planning by reducing inertia, but don't you then have to plan for virtualization? How the planning difficulties and improvements balance out has a lot to do with how rapidly we can expect virtualization to evolve.

  • How DevOps Failed 60K Users

    Back in 2006, when I was an operations engineer at Slideshare, I was part of a team that launched a DevOps model to speed processes and stay ahead of our competition.

  • Democratizing Docker: Changing Containers' Competitive Landscape

    At DockerCon 16, approximately 4,000 attendees descended on the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle from June 19 to 21 to learn about and experience the phenomenon that is the Docker container ecosystem.

    The big news of the event came on the first day of the conference with the announcement of Docker 1.12 and its integrated orchestration system. In the keynote speeches and in multiple sessions that I attended, that new Swarm mode was a hot topic of technical and business discussion.

  • Apple Opens the iOS 10 Kernel, Sony Compensates Linux Users… [Tech News Digest]
  • Here's How Much You'll Get From Sony's PlayStation 3 Bungle
  • Sony Settles 'Other OS' PS3 Lawsuit
  • Did you install Linux on your PS3? Then Sony owes you $55
  • Sony Settlement Gives PS3 Owners $9 After Company Made Console Less Useful Via Firmware Update

    We've noted countless times how in the modern computing era, you don't really own what you think you own. You don't really own the music or books that can arbitrarily disappear on your devices, and you no longer really own a wide variety of hardware that can be dramatically changed (often for the worse) via firmware update months or years after purchase. If you're extra lucky, you'll shell out $300 for a piece of hardware that one year later simply won't work at all. With intelligent automobiles and the rise of the internet-of-not-so-smart things, that's more true now than ever.

    Case in point: back in 2010 we noted how Sony issued several firmware updates for its Playstation 3 gaming console that effectively made the console less useful. One specifically (PS3 software update 3.21) removed the console owner's ability to load alternative operating systems like Linux. But tinkerers being tinkerers, some users found ways to use the feature to expand the console's functionality in all kinds of creative ways. Fearing a loss of control and potential spike in piracy, Sony decided to make the console significantly less useful.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: Linux Mint 18 (Sarah)

If you were looking to jump the Ubuntu ship completely, then we recommend taking a look at our recent Review of Fedora 24. It’s equally as good as Mint 18 and equally worthy of your consideration. Between Linux Mint 18 and Fedora 24, we reckon it’s exciting times in the Linux world. With the exception and onset of the boring world of vanilla Ubuntu releases, Linux feels reinvigorated and fresh once again. Jump on board, because it can only get better from here. Read more

Security Leftovers

GNU News

Leftovers: OSS

  • Mozilla Firefox 47.0.1 Is Now Available in the Arch Linux and Solus Repos
    Mozilla quietly delivered the first point release of the Mozilla Firefox 47.0 web browser to users of Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X operating systems on the day of June 28, 2016. However, because the built-in updater of the Mozilla Firefox web browser doesn't work on GNU/Linux distributions, users have to wait for the latest version of the software to be first pushed by the maintainers of their operating systems on the main repositories before they can upgrade.
  • Questions loom about the future of open source at VA
    The CIO for the Department of Veterans' Affairs sought to reassure stakeholders that the agency was committed to open source in the future, but with Congress pressuring the agency to give up the homegrown health record system VistA, the open source community is a bit perplexed.
  • Watch out for job offers from Google after this open source course
    Over five lakh polytechnic students from 500 colleges across Tamil Nadu would begin training on open source software from Friday, learning more about the nitty-gritties of ‘free’ software under a programme run by the Indian Institute of Technology – Bombay along with the Tamil Nadu government.
  • Bombay Stock Exchange: Open source is a mindset
    Open source is still gaining momentum in the industry worldwide. Despite naysayers, open-source software and hardware are making believers out of a broad array of users. In the case of Bombay Stock Exchange, LTD (BSE), the transition has been cost efficient, as well as has improved order processing power. By switching from proprietary hardware to open source, Kersi Tavadia, CIO of BSE, reported going from being able to process 10 million orders a day to 400 million. Even with the increase, the new open-source hardware is only using 10 percent capacity.
  • GitHub releases data on 2.8 million open source repositories through Google BigQuery
    GitHub today announced that it’s releasing activity data for 2.8 million open source code repositories and making it available for people to analyze with the Google BigQuery cloud-based data warehousing tool. The data set is free to explore. (With BigQuery you get to process up to one terabyte each month free of charge.) This new 3TB data set includes information on “more than 145 million unique commits, over 2 billion different file paths and the contents of the latest revision for 163 million files, all of which are searchable with regular expressions,” Arfon Smith, program manager for open source data at GitHub, wrote in a blog post.
  • How one company is using open source to double its customers’ mobile business
    Most retailers today stay a step or two behind when it comes to modern technology, especially on the mobile side. Sawyer Effect, LLC, a consultant for J.Crew Group, Inc., has been using Red Hat, Inc.’s open-source product Ansible, an IT automation engine, to get its customer’s mobile business up to speed and greatly improve its business.
  • Can Capital One change banking with open source, mobile apps, and NoSQL?
    Oron Gill Haus of Capital One came to MongoDB World to present on Hygieia, an open source DevOps dashboard built on MongoDB. Behind that dashboard lies an ambition to change the customer banking experience – no small feat. Prior to his keynote, Haus shared his team’s story with me.
  • How bank Capital One developed an open source DevOps visualisation tool based on MongoDB
    In order to keep up with customers' expectation of a proactive service available 24x7 on many devices, US bank Capital One moved to an agile DevOps structure and a year ago released its own DevOps dashboard. While visualisation tools were available for continuous integration, scanning and testing, Capital One's development team was unable to find one that provided a complete overview of the whole production process. The dashboard they developed, called Hygieia, was open sourced to encourage rapid development. It is currently in version 2.0. VP of engineering Gil Haus explained some of the thought processes that went into the creation of Hygieia.
  • What is DC/OS?
    What if we could take the total amount of power in any cloud computing datacentre and provide a means of defining that as one total abstracted compute resource? This notion has given brith to DC/OS, a technology base built on Apache Mesos to abstract a datacentre into a single computer, pooling distributed workloads and (allegedly) simplifying both rollout and operations.
  • What's holding your conference back
  • Airtel Leverages Cloudera Enterprise to Improve Customer Experience and Product Personalization
  • Airtel adopts Cloudera for business intelligence
  • Airtel moves customer data on an open source platform
  • ​RightScale can help you pick out the right public cloud
    For example, let's say you need a local cloud in Australia. With the tool, you'll see that Google can't help you while the others can. Or, for instance say you've tied your business to Oracle and you want Oracle Linux as your operating system. The program will quickly and easily tell you that AWS and Azure are the clouds for you.
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Bahir™ as a Top-Level Project
    Apache Bahir bolsters Big Data processing by serving as a home for existing connectors that initiated under Apache Spark, as well as provide additional extensions/plugins for other related distributed system, storage, and query execution systems.
  • Bahir is the Latest Big Data Project to Advance at Apache
    Recently, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support and more.
  • MongoDB launches Atlas, its new database-as-a-service offering
    MongoDB, the company behind the eponymous open source database, is launching Atlas today, its third major revenue-generating service. Atlas is MongoDB’s database-as-a-service offering that provides users with a managed database service. The service will offer pay-as-you-go pricing and will initially allow users to deploy on Amazon Web Services (AWS), with support for Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform coming later.