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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • How to build an IoT project with Mongoose OS

    It could be a small single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi, which costs around US $30, BeagleBone for approximately US $60, Intel Edison for US $70, or other similar devices. These computers usually run Linux. These are suitable for some tasks, like being a gateway device, but again they are quite large, very power hungry, and too expensive to run on things like sensors, wearables, and small appliances.

  • A Look at MINIBIAN: A Minimalist Image for Raspberry Pi

    My way of celebrating Pi Day (March 14th = 3.14) was to take a look at an awesome little image for the Raspberry Pi called Minibian. A new edition of Minibian was released on 12 March 2017, updating the image with support for the latest RPi 3B and other improvements.

    Minibian is based on and fully compatible with the official Raspbian “Jesse” software. It is meant to be used for embedded linux and server type situations, and that is great for IoT scenarios. There is no desktop environment and much effort has gone to providing a minimalist operating system that conserves system resources. The 12 March release of Minibian boasts a 15 second boot time, 31 MB of RAM usage, 477 MB of disk space usage, and is small enough to fit on a 1GB SD card. My test install and inspection of Minibian shows that these claims are indeed correct.

  • Tough, 84 x 55mm Intel Atom COM offers soldered memory

    Eurotech’s rugged, Linux-friendly “CPU-163-15” is an 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Bay Trail Atoms and soldered ECC and eMMC.

    Eurotech’s Intel Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CPU-163-15 COM Express Type 10 Mini module continues the Amaro, Italy based company’s tradition of offering rugged embedded boards with support for its cloud-based Everyware Software Framework (ESF) IoT platform. Other recent Intel-based COM Express modules from Eurotech include the CPU-161-18, a headless COM Express Type 6 Compact module with a 12-core Xeon-D1500 from the Broadwell generation.

  • BQ Deutschland releases Android 7.1.1 OTA for the Aquaris X5 Plus (while most of us still haven't received 7.0)

7 Ways You Can Use Linux to Organize Your Life

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Many people have taken to using smartphones to keep their lives in order, but not you! You have a system in place that you’ve perfected over years, and your laptop or desktop remains your primary means of keeping everything in order. But now you’re switching to Linux, and you want to know what’s out there.

Linux may not have the same apps you’ve grown accustomed to, but there’s no shortage of software that can help you keep track of everything. Whether it’s juggling dates or managing your finances, Linux has plenty of tools to organize your life. Here’s a taste, one category at a time.

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Also: Microsoft is disgustingly sneaky: Windows 10 isn't an operating system, it's an advertising platform

How to write SD cards for the Raspberry Pi

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Linux

Writing SD cards for the Raspberry Pi is something that every member of the Pi community has attempted. Some are old hats and tackle the task with aplomb, but for some it strikes fear into their hearts.

In this article, I look at two different ways to write an SD card. First using the latest application to offer a simple GUI, Etcher. Then, I take a look at dcfldd, a Linux terminal command that expands on the popular dd command and offers much more functionality.

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Linux 4.4.54

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.54 kernel.

All users of the 4.4 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux 4.9.15

Desktop Linux the best it’s ever been—and keeps getting better

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Linux

While users of proprietary operating systems suffer with new, slower, buggier, more spy-filled systems, Linux users are enjoying better performance and more support.

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Colibri COM offers WiFi, Bluetooth, and a new i.MX6 ULL SoC

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Linux

Toradex unveiled a Linux-driven Colibri module with NXP’s i.MX6 ULL SoC that offers industrial temperature support and dual-band WiFi-ac and BT 4.2/BLE.

Toradex has revealed preliminary specs — but so far no photo — of its Colibri iMX6ULL — the first of Toradex’s 67.6 x 36.7mm Colibri modules to offer onboard wireless. It’s also the first embedded board we’ve seen that features NXP’s new cost-optimized version of the i.MX6 UL (UltraLite) called the i.MX6 ULL. The module will ship in the third quarter.

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A Penguin tries FreeBSD as a desktop operating system

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GNU
Linux
BSD

A Penguin tries FreeBSD 11.0 RELEASE on an old i386 PC as his main desktop operating system, for the first time, for a weekend.

The story begins, you guess, with the operating system installation using the FreeBSD i386 hybrid image in order to boot a USB key.

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Also: openbsd changes of note 7

Linux Kernel 4.10.3 Released with Better Graphics Drivers, s390 and x86 Fixes

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Linux

Coming only three days after the release of Linux kernel 4.10.2, the third maintenance update to the Linux 4.10 kernel series was announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman a few moments ago.

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Linux Devices

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Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.