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Linux

Microsoft Powershell Is Now Available For Linux

Filed under
Linux
News

​Powershell is a Windows command line tool and associated scripting language built on the .Net framework for performing administrative tasks on both local and remote Windows systems. Powershell has been a part of Windows systems for 10 years(November 14, 2006 ). On 18th August Microsoft announced on their blog that they have brought Powershell to Mac OSX and Linux.

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Desktop News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • The aristocratic desktop (part 1)

    Still, there was some issues. And I discovered that some very basic concepts are harder to understand than I thought. Double-click, a window, a folder, the desktop, the taskbar, the trayicon. I also discovered that some users were using a computer for ten years without even understanding the minimize function for a window ! The only way to switch between a web page and a word processor was to close one and then opening the other. It was seen as normal !

  • Windows 10 needs proper privacy portal, says EFF

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has called on Microsoft to offer a “single unified screen” on which Windows 10 users can control how Windows 10 deals with their personal information and monitors their use of the OS.

    The organisation has listed the long list of nasty nagware tactics Microsoft used to get people running Windows 10, labelling some “questionable tactics to cause users to download a piece of software that many didn’t want.”

    It's not keen on the nagware bundled alongside patches, suggesting that tactic reduced trust in patches and therefore potentially exposed users who don't act promptly when important fixes arrive.

    It also rails against the telemetry Windows 10 collects and is especially harsh on Microsoft's insistence that if business users send it less data, Windows Update will be less effective and PCs will be less secure.

    The Foundation says “this is a false choice that is entirely of Microsoft’s own creation.”

    “There’s no good reason why the types of data Microsoft collects at each telemetry level couldn’t be adjusted so that even at the lowest level of telemetry collection, users could still benefit from Windows Update and secure their machines from vulnerabilities, without having to send back things like app usage data or unique Ids like an IMEI number.”

  • Microsoft wants to pay you to use its Windows 10 browser Edge [Ed: CNET's editor in chief called it "Bribery" last time Microsoft did such things. How to starve a lesser wealthy competitor, drive it out of the market...]

    Microsoft has a new browser. It launched with Windows 10 and it’s called Edge. The company says it’s faster, more battery efficient and all-round better than Chrome or Firefox. You can even draw on websites with a stylus. Trouble is, not very many people are using it. So now Microsoft’s trying to bribe you to switch.

    The newly rebranded Microsoft Rewards – formerly Bing Rewards, which paid people for using Bing as their search engine (another product Microsoft says is better than a Google product but that very few people actually use) – will now pay you for using Edge, shopping at the Microsoft store, or using Bing.

    Users of Edge who sign up to Microsoft Rewards, which is currently US-only, are then awarded points simply for using the browser. Microsoft actively monitors whether you’re using Edge for up to 30 hours a month. It tracks mouse movements and other signs that you’re not trying to game the system, and you must also have Bing set as your default search engine.

Arch Linux Take Your Linux Knowledge To Next Level [Review]

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This review will be a bit unconventional, probably because Arch Linux itself is a bit unconventional. Rather than having continued, numbered releases like most distros, Arch Linux follows the rolling-release model, meaning that you install Arch once and it updates forever (or at least, until you break something). There is no “Arch Linux 16.04 LTS”, there is simply Arch Linux. The philosophy of Arch, known as The Arch Way, focuses on simplicity and user centrality, rather than user friendliness.

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Beyond Linux: 7 Open-Source Projects the Linux Foundation Is Leading

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Linux Foundation got its start in 2007 as a home for the development of Linux and its creator Linus Torvalds. In the last decade, the mission of the foundation has expanded beyond the confines of the Linux kernel. Although the Linux kernel still remains central, the foundation's model of enabling open, collaborative software development has proven valuable to multiple groups. That's where the Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects effort comes in, enabling groups of developers to bring software projects under the Linux Foundation umbrella. By being part of the foundation, software projects benefit from its infrastructure and expertise at helping to shepherd and grow open-source software development efforts in a vendor-neutral approach. A 2014 slideshow on eWEEK looked at 10 projects beyond Linux that the foundation now manages. So far in 2016, the Linux Foundation has announced at least seven new efforts that are now collaborative projects. eWEEK takes a look at some of the efforts the foundation is leading beyond just Linux.

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New BlackArch Linux ISO Lands with Over 1,500 Penetration Testing, Hacking Tools

Filed under
Linux

The skilful team of developers and security professional behind the BlackArch Linux operating system have announced today, August 19, 2016, the general availability of a new ISO image.

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Linux Foundation Conquers the World, or at Least Becomes Quite Influential in SDN & NFV

Filed under
Linux

Open source projects are new to networking, but they’ve been cropping up all over the place in the last couple of years. And many of them are gravitating toward the Linux Foundation.

Some of them were originally independent groups. The Open Network Operating System (ONOS) for example, was founded by On.lab. But in October, it became part of the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation was already hosting the OpenDaylight Project, which some considered a rival to ONOS. But the two groups seem to be happily coexisting under the same host.

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Benchmarks: 2 BSDs vs. 7 Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

The operating systems tested for this comparison included CentOS Linux 7, Clear Linux 9710, DragonFlyBSD 4.6.0, Fedora 24, FreeBSD 11.0-Beta 4, Manjaro 16.06.1, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, and a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 16.10. For those wondering about OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, I'll have tests of that Clang-compiled distribution later in the week. This BSD/Linux OS comparison grew out of curiosity sake when first seeking to test how well DragonFlyBSD 4.6 and FreeBSD 11 are performing.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

3 command line music players for Linux

Filed under
Linux

One perception that Linux can't seem to shake off is that you can't do anything without using the command line. A number of people in my circle have been using Linux effectively for years, and they've yet to crack open a terminal window.

Having said that, working at the command line can make certain tasks faster and more efficient. If you're using older hardware, command line tools are an excellent alternative to graphical applications since they don't use too many resources.

One of those tasks playing music. You can do that in a terminal. How? Here's a look at three command line music players.

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Linux Kernel 3.14.76 LTS Updates InfiniBand Drivers, Improves EXT4 Support

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.1, Linux kernel 4.4.18 LTS, and Linux kernel 4.6.7, which marks the end of the Linux 4.6 series, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of Linux kernel 3.14.76 LTS.

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More in Tux Machines

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • World Wide Web became what it is thanks to Linux
    Linux is used to power the largest websites on the Internet, including Google, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, and Wikipedia.
  • SFC's Kuhn in firing line as Linus Torvalds takes aim
    A few days after he mused that there had been no reason for him to blow his stack recently, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has directed a blast at the Software Freedom Conservancy and its distinguished technologist Bradley Kuhn over the question of enforcing compliance of the GNU General Public Licence. Torvalds' rant came on Friday, as usual on a mailing list and on a thread which was started by Software Freedom Conservancy head Karen Sandler on Wednesday last week. She suggested that Linuxcon in Toronto, held from Monday to Thursday, also include a session on GPL enforcement.
  • Linux at 25: A pictorial history
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.