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Linux

Cortex-A5 module has mainline Linux and an open-spec carrier

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Linux

Acme’s 40 x 30mm “RoadRunner” COM runs Linux on a Microchip Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D27, and offers -40 to 85°C support and an optional “Berta D2” carrier.

The RoadRunner computer-on-module is more synergistically named than Acme Systems’ previous Acqua A5, which similarly ran Linux on a Microchip (then Atmel) SAMA5D SoC. The RoadRunner uses the newer SAMA5D2, which is more power-efficient than the Acqua A5’s SAMA5D3.

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IoT cloud service adds Linux support via free BeagleBone BSP

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Linux

Anaren released v2.1 of its Anaren Atmosphere cloud-based IoT development platform, for the first time adding Linux support via a free BeagleBone Black BSP.

Syracuse, New York based Anaren IoT Group, which is known for its AIR-branded WiFi, Bluetooth, ZigBee, and RF modules, also offers a web-based Anaren Atmosphere online development platform designed to hook up wireless enabled gizmos to an Amazon Web Services (AWS) hosted cloud service. Anaren already sells several MCU-based, sensor-enabled Atmosphere development kits that feature WiFi, Bluetooth Smart, and cellular communications. Now, with the release of its latest Atmosphere 2.1 software, it is delivering its first Linux-driven kit by reaching out to target the popular, open-spec BeagleBone Black SBC.

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6 reasons why GNOME is still the best Linux desktop environment

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Linux
GNOME

I've been using Linux for about 15 years now, trying multiple desktop environments along the way. For the majority of my career, I was a diehard KDE Plasma user (starting with version 2.x). I stuck with Plasma for the majority of the 4.x series, eventually moving on due to stability issues. I've tried Xfce, MATE, Openbox, and many others, but ever since I switched to GNOME 3, I've never looked back. It's a responsive and stable environment that allows me to focus on my work with minimal distractions.

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How to get started with Linux: A beginner's guide

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GNU
Linux

The world of Linux is ready to welcome you, with a shower of free open-source software you can use on any PC: hundreds of active Linux distributions, and dozens of different desktop environments you could run on them. It’s a far cry from the one-size-fits-all, this-is-just-what-comes-with-your-PC vision of Windows.

Everything from software installation to hardware drivers works differently on Linux, though, which can be daunting. Take heart—you don’t even need to install Linux on your PC to get started. Here’s everything you need to know.

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Also: Linux IT Career Advice | Unleaded Hangout

Automotive Grade Linux Moves to UCB 4.0, Launches Virtualization Workgroup

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Linux

The Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) project released Unified Code Base (UCB) 4.0 (“Daring Dab”) for Linux-based in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems, and added seven new members. The open source group also launched a new virtualization working group that will enable new UCB profiles for telematics, instrument clusters, and head-up-displays (HUDs). In other Linux automotive news, Ubuntu has been spotted in an Uber self-driving car trial (see below).

The new AGL members bring the total membership to over 100. The newcomers are Brison, Karamba Security, Lear Corp., Luxoft, Thundersoft, SafeRide Cyber Security, and Wipro Ltd. The announcement follows an April expansion of six new members.

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NOVA: The Newest Linux File-System, Designed For Persistent Memory

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Linux

It's been an interesting week for Linux storage with Red Hat deprecating Btrfs and Stratis being their next-gen Linux storage bet. Independent of that is now the announcement of NOVA, a new Linux file-system coming out of university research into file-systems for persistent memory.

NOVA is short for NOn-Volatile memory Accelerated file-system built for persistent memory. NOVA was developed at the beautiful University of California, San Diego.

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Vulkan Gains and Features

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Epic Games Is Planning To Use Vulkan By Default For Unreal Engine On Linux

    Epic Games has an interesting goal of eventually being able to use the Vulkan graphics API by default on Linux systems running the Unreal Engine.

  • The Vulkan Feature List For Mesa

    Intel's Jordan Justen has added to Mesa's feature.txt the current Vulkan extensions as well as indicating the current state of each Mesa Vulkan driver regarding their support.

    As most Phoronix readers should know, right now there is just the Intel "ANV" and (unofficial) Radeon "RADV" Vulkan drivers within the Mesa Git tree. And as frequent readers should know, most of the Vulkan extensions are implemented by both drivers.

Antergos 17.8 Released

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GNU
Linux

5 ways to use Raspberry Pi in the classroom

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Linux

I recently finished reading Your Starter Guide to Maker Spaces by Nick Provenzano, a Raspberry Pi Certified Educator. In the book, Nick describes a Raspberry Pi competition at the school where he teaches.

Each student received a Raspberry Pi kit and was told to identify a problem, come up with a solution using the Pi, and not spend more than $75 on their project. The students' solutions varied, but the common result was that the students taught themselves to code. This is what happens when you give students a broad assignment and ample opportunity to explore learning on their own.

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Automotive Grade Linux Gains

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Linux
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Linux & Radio: What You Can Do With It Now

Third, there is a belief that Linux apps are still too primitive to get anything productive done. Besides (whiny voice), “I tried Linux in 2005, and it was just too ha-r-r-d.” Sorry. A lot of those objections are no longer valid. Linux is solid, stable, free for the most part and has become as easy to navigate as Windows. And those old apps are all grown up now. You may have skipped over previous Linux articles we’ve run, but don’t skip this one. We’re not going to crow about Linux like it’s something brand new, because we both know it has been on your radar screen for 20+ years. This time, we’d rather you read about what you can do with it at your station — and primarily in your production studio — right now. Read more