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First Raspberry Pi Desktop Release Based on Debian Stretch Is Out for PCs & Macs

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Linux
Debian

The company kicked off the month of December with a big announcement today, announcing that they've managed to rebase the Raspberry Pi Desktop OS for PCs and Macs on the latest stable Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, as well as to release a new version of the Raspbian Stretch distro for Raspberry Pi.

"Today, we are launching the first Debian Stretch release of the Raspberry Pi Desktop for PCs and Macs," said Simon Long, UX engineer at Raspberry Pi Foundation. "We’re also pleased to announce that we are releasing the latest version of Raspbian Stretch for your Pi today."

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System76 is disabling Intel's flawed Management Engine on its Linux laptops

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Linux

LINUX PC FLOGGER System76 has announced that it'll be disabling Intel's flawed Management Engine on all its laptops.

Earlier this month, Intel posted a security advisory warning manufacturers and users of its Management Engine of a number of firmware-level vulnerabilities and bugs found, which were also present in its Server Platform Services and the Trusted Execution Engine.

Security researchers warned that cybercriminals can cause instability with complete system crashes by exploiting the management engine, noting that they've also found a way to "impersonate" the engine and, in the process, kill existing PC security mechanisms.

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Devices: Qseven, Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Qseven module builds on Apollo Lake SoCs

    Avalue has launched a Linux-ready “EQM-APL” Qseven module with Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 64GB eMMC, and optional -40 to 85°C support.

    Avalue’s EQM-APL joins other Intel Apollo Lake based Qseven modules such as Axiomtek’s Q7M311, MSC’s MSC Q7-AL, Arbor’s EmQ-i2401, Portwell’s PQ7-M108, Advantech’s SOM-3569, Congatec’s Conga-QA5, and Seco’s Q7-B03. The 70 x 70mm, Qseven 2.1 compliant EQM-APL supports Linux, Android, and Windows 10 on all three Apollo Lake Atom options, as well as the Pentium N4200 and Celeron N3350.

  • Have you got Gear S3 FACER watch face issues after Tizen 3.0 update? Here are the Fixes
  • Hulu’s new UI and live TV service are now available on Samsung’s 2017 Smart TVs
  • Essential CEO Andy Rubin goes on leave for “personal reasons”

    Andy Rubin, the founder of Google’s Android and current CEO of Essential, is taking a month-long leave from Essential for “personal reasons.” At the same time, a report of an “inappropriate relationship” at Google has surfaced.

    A report from The Information claims that Google’s HR division conducted an investigation into Rubin after a complaint and found that he maintained an “inappropriate relationship” with a subordinate while at the Internet giant. Google policy forbids a romantic relationship between supervisors and subordinates, and Google’s investigation apparently concluded that “Rubin’s behavior was improper and showed bad judgement.” (Although Google cofounder Sergey Brin ran the Google Glass team and dated the Google Glass marketing manager, Amanda Rosenberg.)

  • 8 Best Secure And Encrypted Messaging Apps For Android & iOS

    Millions of people exchange message all over the world every day. But, how many people know what happens to a message once they send it? Is it being intercepted by any third-party users? Well, the truth is, we live in an age of internet surveillance and data logging. Agencies and organizations often want access to private communication; we have had instances of CIA hacking attempts and attempts by FBI to gain unauthorized access. Such events have raised concerns among users. To tackle such issues, there has been a rise in secure messaging apps. These apps focus on keeping your privacy intact by launching end-to-end encryption services.

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  • Google Launches Datally To Save Mobile Data In Android
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 - Old tablet, new times

System76 Shuts Off Intel Back Doors, But Will Continue to Pay Intel

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Security
  • System76 Will Begin Disabling Intel ME In Their Linux Laptops

    Following the recent Intel Management Engine (ME) vulnerabilities combined with some engineering work the past few months on their end, System76 will begin disabling ME on their laptops.

  • Linux hardware vendor outlines Intel Management Engine firmware plan

    The Linux-equipped computer maker, System76, has detailed plans to update the Intel Management Engine (ME) firmware on its computers in line with Intel’s November 20th vulnerability announcement. In July, System76 began work on a project to automatically deliver firmware to System76 laptops which works in a similar fashion to how software is usually delivered through the operating system.

  • System76 to disable Intel Management Engine on its notebooks

    Intel has recently confirmed the earlier findings of third parties who revealed that its Management Engine firmware has some serious security issues. Since we talked about this recently, we should now move to System76's approach in handling this situation.

Alpine Linux 3.7.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are pleased to announce the release of Alpine Linux 3.7.0, the first in the v3.7 stable series.

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Also: Alpine Linux 3.7 Brings EFI Support, Installer Option For GRUB

Want to switch from Apple macOS to Linux because of the 'root' security bug? Give deepin 15.5 a try!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Security

Apple's macOS is a great operating system. Not only is it stable and beautifully designed, but it very secure too. Well, usually it is. Unless you live under a rock, you definitely heard about the macOS High Sierra security bug that made the news over the last couple of days. In case you somehow are unaware, the bug essentially made it so anyone could log into any Mac running the latest version of the operating system.

Luckily, Apple has already patched the bug, and some people -- like me -- have forgiven the company. Understandably, not everyone will be as forgiving as me. Undoubtedly, there are Mac users that are ready to jump ship as a result of the embarrassing bug. While that is probably an overreaction, if you are set on trying an alternative operating system, you should not go with Windows 10. Instead, you should embrace Linux. In fact, rather serendipitously, a Linux distribution with a UI reminiscent of macOS gets a new version today. Called "deepin," version 15.5 of the distro is now ready to download.

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Also: deepin 15.5 Linux Distro Released — Get A Beautiful And Easy-to-use Linux Experience

Google launches TensorFlow-based vision recognition kit for RPi Zero W

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Linux

Google’s $45 “AIY Vision Kit” for the Raspberry Pi Zero W performs TensorFlow-based vision recognition using a “VisionBonnet” board with a Movidius chip.

Google’s AIY Vision Kit for on-device neural network acceleration follows an earlier AIY Projects voice/AI kit for the Raspberry Pi that shipped to MagPi subscribers back in May. Like the voice kit and the older Google Cardboard VR viewer, the new AIY Vision Kit has a cardboard enclosure. The kit differs from the Cloud Vision API, which was demo’d in 2015 with a Raspberry Pi based GoPiGo robot, in that it runs entirely on local processing power rather than requiring a cloud connection. The AIY Vision Kit is available now for pre-order at $45, with shipments due in early December.

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System76 will disable Intel Management engine on its Linux laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

System76 is one a handful of companies that sells computers that run Linux software out of the box. But like most PCs that have shipped with Intel’s Core processors in the past few years, System76 laptops include Intel’s Management Engine firmware.

Intel recently confirmed a major security vulnerability affecting those chips and it’s working with PC makers to patch that vulnerability.

But System76 is taking another approach: it’s going to roll out a firmware update for its recent laptops that disables the Intel Management Engine altogether.

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Kernel: Linux 4.14.3, 4.9.66, 4.4.103, 3.18.85 and Linux Foundation Pieces

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.14.3
  • Linux 4.9.66
  • Linux 4.4.103
  • Linux 3.18.85
  • Four new stable kernels

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the release of the 4.14.3, 4.9.66, 4.4.103, and 3.18.85 stable kernels. As usual, they contain fixes throughout the tree; users of those series should upgrade.

  • A Closed-Source Apple File-System APFS Driver For Linux Announced

    With macOS High Sierra finally ditching the HFS+ file-system and switching all macOS users over to Apple's new file-system, APFS, you may find the need to read a APFS file-system from another non-macOS device. Now it's possible with an APFS Linux file-system driver, but it's closed-source and doesn't yet have write capabilities.

    Paragon Software who has also developed a commercial Microsoft ReFS Linux file-system driver as well as an EXT4 driver for Windows has now developed an Apple File-System (APFS) driver for Linux systems.

  • What OPNFV Makes Possible in Open Source

    OPNFV provides both tangible and intangible benefits to end users. Tangible benefits include those that directly impact business metrics, whereas the intangibles include benefits that speed up the overall NFV transformation journey but are harder to measure. The nature of the OPNFV project, where it primarily focuses on integration and testing of upstream projects and adds carrier-grade features to these upstream projects, can make it difficult to understand these benefits.

    To understand this more clearly, let’s go back to the era before OPNFV. Open source projects do not, as a matter of routine, perform integration and testing with other open source projects. So, the burden of taking multiple disparate projects and making the stack work for NFV primarily fell on Communications Service Providers (CSPs), although in some cases vendors shouldered part of the burden. For CSPs or vendors to do the same integration and testing didn’t make sense.

  • The Evolving Developer Advocate Role — A Conversation with Google’s Kim Bannerman

    At this year’s Cloud Foundry Summit Europe, the story was about developers as the heroes. They’re the ones who make the platforms. They are akin to the engineers who played such a pivotal role in designing the railroads, or in modern times made the smartphone possible. This means a more important role for developer advocates who, at organizations such as Google, are spending a lot more time with customers. These are the subject matter experts helping developers build out their platforms. They are gathering data to develop feedback loops that flow back into open source communities for ongoing development.

Faulty Graphics Driver From NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • NVIDIA Confirms Linux Driver Performance Regression, To Be Fixed In 390 Series

    If you think recent NVIDIA Linux driver releases have been slowing down your games, you are not alone, especially if you are running with a GeForce graphics card having a more conservative vRAM capacity by today's standards.

    Long time ago Nouveau contributor turned NVIDIA Linux engineer Arthur Huillet confirmed there is a bug in their memory management introduced since their 378 driver series that is still present in the latest 387 releases.

  • NVIDIA has confirmed a driver bug resulting in a loss of performance on Linux

    It seems there's a performance bug in recent NVIDIA drivers that has been causing a loss of performance across likely all GPUs. Not only that, but it seems to end up using more VRAM than previous drivers too.

    User HeavyHDx started a thread on the official NVIDIA forum, to describe quite a big drop in performance since the 375 driver series. So all driver updates since then would have been affected by this.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distro to Get a New Look with Debonaire Desktop Theme

Q4OS is a small GNU/Linux distribution based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE). It's explicitly designed to make the Microsoft Windows to Linux transition accessible and more straightforward as possible for anyone. Dubbed Debonaire, the new desktop theme uses dark-ish elements for the window titlebar and panel. Somehow it resembles the look and feels of the acclaimed Arc GTK+ theme, and it makes the Q4OS operating system more modern than the standard look offered by the Trinity Desktop Environment. Read more

today's leftovers

Software: GIMP, VLC, Cryptsetup, Caprine, KWin and NetworkManager

  • GIMP 2.9.8 Open-Source Image Editor Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing
    GIMP 2.9.8, a development version towards the major GIMP 2.10 release, was announced by developer Alexandre Prokoudine for all supported platforms, including Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released
    Newly released GIMP 2.9.8 introduces on-canvas gradient editing and various enhancements while focusing on bugfixing and stability. For a complete list of changes please see NEWS.
  • It Looks Like VLC 3.0 Will Finally Be Released Soon
    VLC 3.0 is something we've been looking forward to for years and it's looking like that big multimedia player update could be released very soon. Thanks to Phoronix reader Fran for pointing out that VLC 3.0 release candidates have begun to not much attention. VLC 3.0 RC1 was tagged at the end of November and then on Tuesday marked VLC 3.0 RC2 being tagged, but without any official release announcements.
  • cryptsetup 2.0.0
  • Cryptsetup 2.0 Released With LUKS2 Format Support
    A new major release is available of Cryptsetup, the user-space utility for dealing with the DMCrypt kernel module for setting up encrypted disk volumes. Cryptsetup 2.0.0 is notable in that it introduces support for the new on-disk LUKS2 format but still retaining support for LUKS(1). The LUKS2 format is security hardened to a greater extent, more extensible than LUKS, supports in-place upgrading from LUKS, and other changes.
  • Caprine – An Unofficial Elegant Facebook Messenger Desktop App
    There is no doubt Facebook is one of the most popular and dynamic social network platform in the modern Internet era. It has revolutionized technology, social networking, and the future of how we live and interact. With Facebook, We can connect, communicate with one another, instantly share our memories, photos, files and even money to anyone, anywhere in the world. Even though Facebook has its own official messenger, some tech enthusiasts and developers are developing alternative and feature-rich apps to communicate with your buddies. The one we are going to discuss today is Caprine. It is a free, elegant, open source, and unofficial Facebook messenger desktop app built with Electron framework.
  • KWin On Wayland Without X11 Support Can Startup So Fast It Causes Problems
    It turns out that if firing up KDE's KWin Wayland compositor without XWayland support, it can start up so fast that it causes problems. Without XWayland for providing legacy X11 support to KDE Wayland clients, the KWin compositor fires up so fast that it can cause a crash in their Wayland integration as KWin's internal connection isn't even established... Yep, Wayland compositors are much leaner and cleaner than the aging X Server code-base that dates back 30+ years, granted most of the XWayland code is much newer than that.
  • NetworkManager Picks Up Support For Intel's IWD WiFi Daemon & Meson Build System
    NetworkManager now has support for Intel's lean "IWD" WiFi daemon. IWD is a lightweight daemon for managing WiFi devices via a D-Bus interface and has been in development since 2013 (but was only made public in 2016) and just depends upon GCC / Glibc / ELL (Embedded Linux Library).

Linux Foundation: Servers, Kubernetes and OpenContrail

  • Many cloud-native hands try to make light work of Kubernetes
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation, home of the Kubernetes open-source community, grew wildly this year. It welcomed membership from industry giants like Amazon Web Services Inc. and broke attendance records at last week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon conference in Austin, Texas. This is all happy news for Kubernetes — the favored platform for orchestrating containers (a virtualized method for running distributed applications). The technology needs all the untangling, simplifying fingers it can get. This is also why most in the community are happy to tamp down their competitive instincts to chip away at common difficulties. “You kind of have to,” said Michelle Noorali (pictured), senior software engineer at Microsoft and co-chair of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America & Europe 2017. “These problems are really hard.”
  • Leveraging NFV and SDN for network slicing
    Network slicing is poised to play a pivotal role in the enablement of 5G. The technology allows operators to run multiple virtual networks on top of a single, physical infrastructure. With 5G commercialization set for 2020, many are wondering to what extend network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) can help move network slicing forward.
  • Juniper moves OpenContrail's SDN codebase to Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks has announced its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail, an open-source network virtualisation platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. OpenContrail provides both software-defined networking (SDN) and security features and has been deployed by various organisations, including cloud providers, telecom operators and enterprises to simplify operational complexities and automate workload management across diverse cloud environments.
  • Juniper moves OpenContrail’s codebase to Linux Foundation, advances cloud approach
    Juniper Networks plans to move the codebase for its OpenContrail open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud to the Linux Foundation, broadening its efforts to drive more software innovations into the broader IT and service provider community. The vendor is hardly a novice in developing open source platforms. In 2013, Juniper released its Contrail products as open sourced and built a user and developer community around the project. To drive its next growth phase, Juniper expanded the project’s governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort.
  • 3 Essential Questions to Ask at Your Next Tech Interview
    The annual Open Source Jobs Report from Dice and The Linux Foundation reveals a lot about prospects for open source professionals and hiring activity in the year ahead. In this year’s report, 86 percent of tech professionals said that knowing open source has advanced their careers. Yet what happens with all that experience when it comes time for advancing within their own organization or applying for a new roles elsewhere?