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Linux

Pico-ITX SBC runs Linux on 1.9GHz quad-core Atom SoC

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Linux

Axiomtek’s “PICO840″ Pico-ITX SBC features a quad- or dual-core Intel Atom, and offers multiple video ports, plus GbE, SATA, serial, USB, and Mini-PCIe I/O.

The PICO840 is a lower-powered, but more energy efficient alternative to the similarly Pico-ITX based PICO880 single board computer, which runs on a 4th Gen Intel Core processor. The 100 x 72mm PICO840 is said to support PoS systems, mobile medical monitors, compact panel PCs, and other embedded systems with tight space constraints. No OS support was mentioned, but we are confident the PICO840 runs Linux.

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ASUS C201 Chromebook with Rockchip RK3288 SoC Coming Soon

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GNU
Linux
Google

We have been hearing rumors about affordable Chromebooks powered by Rockchip processors ever since last year, but we are yet to see something palpable in this regard.

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The best Chromebook ever: Google's 2015 Pixel

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GNU
Linux
Google

I didn't just buy Google's new Chromebook Pixel. No, I bought the high-end model with the 5th-generation, 2.4GHz Intel Core i7-5500U processor with 16GBs of memory and a 64GB Solid State Drive (SSD) for $1,299. And, I'm not the only one. That top-of-the-line Chromebook Pixel is sold out. Why would I spend this kind of money? Because the Pixel 2015 is worth it.

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Alpine Linux 3.1.3 released

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GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.1.3 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

This is a bugfix release of the v3.1 musl based branch. This release is based on the 3.14.36 kernel which has some critical security fixes.

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Samsung Tizen TV SDK 1.4 has been released

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Linux

The Samsung TV SDK Team has today released Samsung Tizen TV SDK 1.4. Downloads are available for Windows, Linux and also Mac OSX that will enable developers to begin developing for the Tizen TV platform. The tool set includes an Integrated Development Environment (IDE), a light-weight TV Simulator for testing web apps, and a TV Emulator.

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KDE Plasma 5 on Arch Linux review

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KDE
Linux
Reviews

A few weeks ago, during a little break from studies, I’ve finally found some time for installing Plasma 5 on my Arch Linux workstation. Before a not too deep period of usage I’d like to share with you my impressions on the current state of Plasma.

As the title says, I’m going to talk about the 5.2 version of Plasma so everything on this post will concern this version in particular.

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Embedded Linux Keeps Growing Amid IoT Disruption, Says Study

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Linux

A new VDC Research study projects that Linux and Android will continue to increase embedded market share through 2017 while Windows and commercial real-time operating systems (RTOSes) will lose ground. The study suggests that the fast growth of IoT is accelerating the move toward open source Linux.

"Open source, freely, and/or publicly available" Linux will grow from 56.2 percent share of embedded unit shipments in 2012 to 64.7 percent in 2017, according to VDC's "The Global Market for IoT and Embedded Operating Systems." That represents a CAGR of 16.7 percent for open Linux, says VDC.

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5 Golden Rules to Live By as a New Linux User

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GNU
Linux

You have ignored persistent Linux myths and decided to give Linux a try. How do you ensure that your transition to the new OS is smooth? Stick to the following five rules and you should do just fine. It’s time to get over your fear of failing at Linux.

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It's not time for Popcorn Time, and it never will be

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GNU
Linux

Both Linux and open source have come a very long way. But all of those strides could so easily be undone by the constant proliferation of tools such as Popcorn Time. And now, even a Linux distribution, ChaletOS has included Popcorn Time by default. The ChaletOS could be one of those Linux distributions anyone and everyone could use and love. After all, it offers an interface that is as close to Windows 7 as any Linux desktop has ever achieved (thanks to Xfce). Average Windows users will be right at home with an arsenal of applications that easily covers their work and personal needs. But then, the developers throw in Popcorn Time. What makes this doubly odd is that ChaletOS is hosted by Google.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Amazing Facts about Linux Operating System You Probably Don't Know [Ed: This gets some facts wrong, right from the very first sentence]
    It was almost 20 years ago when the first version of Linux came into the market and since then, this operating system has made its important stature beside Microsoft Windows. Linux has turned out to be one of the most acknowledged and extensively used operating system. Enthused by UNIX, Linux has smartly managed to attract a lot of tech giants such as Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Twitter, Amazon, and much more. However, when it comes to assessing the exact rate of adoption of Linux in the market, the task is a bit tough since the sources to get copies are wide in number. Appreciating workers' and developers' hard-work, Linux has been designed in such a way that exploring and learning things on this operating system has become quite captivating and enthralling. In this post, let's know more about amazing features and facts of this operating system.
  • MenuLibre 2.1.4 Released For Menu Editing On GNOME/LXDE/Xfce/Unity
    MenuLibre is an advanced menu editor that supports not just one desktop environment but GNOME, LXDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, and Unity Linux systems. Today's MenuLibre 2.1.4 for advanced menu editing of Linux desktop systems has a new "test launcher" option, new sorting abilities for menus, new layout preferences for desktops supporting client-side decorations, improved file handling, and many bug fixes.
  • EU Makes EUR 1B Bid to Boost Supercomputer Efforts
    The market for High-Performance Computing (HPC) has increasingly been dominated in recent years by China. Now the European Union (EU) is aiming to get back into the hunt with a new initiative called the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking. The goal of the EuroHPC effort is to acquire, build and deploy a world-class High-Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructure. The effort will also involve the development of application software that will run on the HPC infrastructure. The EU will contribute EUR 486 million, which will be matched by Member States and associated countries. According to the EU, approximately EUR 1 billion in total will be invested in the effort by 2020.
  • EasyLinux Show 18.2 | Meltdown, Spectre and Linux Mint
  • Videos on Samba shares
    A longstanding complaint about KDE Plasma is that it’s a pain in the butt to stream videos that are located on Samba shares. It’s a usability issue for sure. I’d like to talk a bit about the origins of the problem and how I helped drive a solution.
  • 3 Growth Stocks to Buy and Hold for 25 Years
  • Swing Trading Earnings Bullish Momentum With Options in Red Hat Inc
  • 10 Best Android Cleaner Apps For 2018

Google's Debian Move and Promotion of DRM Inside Linux

  • Google moves internal systems from Ubuntu to Debian
    Google has begun the process of transitioning its internal machines’ operating systems from Ubuntu to Debian after announcing last year it would make the switch. Google’s engineers have been using a customised version of Ubuntu called Goobuntu, naturally, for years, but according to Spanish website MuyLinux, the tech giant is now moving from a "light-skinned" distro which it has no contribution to, to gLinux, based on Debian Testing.
  • Open-Source HDCP Support Gets Extended To More Platforms
    With the Linux 4.17 kernel (not the upcoming 4.16 cycle) there is likely to be added initial HDCP support to Intel's Direct Rendering Manager driver. Ahead of that this High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection support continues getting improved upon. While Google developers working on Chrome/Chromium OS were the ones originally working on the patches and proposing this HDCP functionality be upstreamed into the mainline i915 DRM Linux driver, coming out today are patches from an Intel developer for extending the HDCP content protection coverage.

SUSE: Change of Plans and Disclosure

  • SUSE Dropping Mainline Work On Their In-Kernel Bootsplash System
    For those that were excited over the months of ongoing work by SUSE to bring up an in-kernel boot splash system that could be better than Plymouth for at least some use-cases and was interesting many readers, unfortunately it's not panning out for mainline. Max Staudt who has been leading this project has sent out his latest version of the patches today, but he's decided to drop pursuing it for mainline. The German Linux developer commented, "found that it doesn't currently make sense to continue working on the splash code, given the low practical interest I've received on LKML...I'll be happy to rebase it and continue to work on it if interest arises."
  • cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards
    The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs. The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

Kernel: Kernelci.org, Tripwire, Linux Foundation, R600 Gallium3D

  • Kernelci.org automated bisection
    The kernelci.org project aims at continuously testing the mainline Linux kernel, from stable branches to linux-next on a variety of platforms. When a revision fails to build or boot, kernel developers get informed via email reports. A summary of all the results can also be found directly on the website.
  • Securing the Linux filesystem with Tripwire
    While Linux is considered to be the most secure operating system (ahead of Windows and MacOS), it is still vulnerable to rootkits and other variants of malware. Thus, Linux users need to know how to protect their servers or personal computers from destruction, and the first step they need to take is to protect the filesystem. In this article, we'll look at Tripwire, an excellent tool for protecting Linux filesystems. Tripwire is an integrity checking tool that enables system administrators, security engineers, and others to detect alterations to system files. Although it's not the only option available (AIDE and Samhain offer similar features), Tripwire is arguably the most commonly used integrity checker for Linux system files, and it is available as open source under GPLv2.
  • Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
    Arpit Joshipura, Networking General Manager at The Linux Foundation, discussed open source networking trends at Open Source Summit Europe. Ever since the birth of local area networks, open source tools and components have driven faster and more capable network technologies forward. At the recent Open Source Summit event in Europe, Arpit Joshipura, Networking General Manager at The Linux Foundation, discussed his vision of open source networks and how they are being driven by full automation. “Networking is cool again,” he said, opening his keynote address with observations on software-defined networks, virtualization, and more. Joshipura is no stranger to network trends. He has led major technology deployments across enterprises, carriers, and cloud architectures, and has been a steady proponent of open source. “This is an extremely important time for our industry,” he said. “There are more than 23 million open source developers, and we are in an environment where everyone is asking for faster and more reliable services.”
  • R600 Gallium3D Gets Some Last Minute Improvements In Mesa 18.0
    These days when Dave Airlie isn't busy managing the DRM subsystem or hacking on the RADV Vulkan driver, he's been spending a fair amount of time on some OpenGL improvements to the aging R600 Gallium3D driver. That's happened again and he's landed some more improvements just ahead of the imminent Mesa 18.0 feature freeze.