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Linux

Fedora 12 Announcement

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Linux

fedoraproject.org: Fedora is a leading edge, free and open source operating system that continues to deliver innovative features to many users, with a new release about every six months. We bring to you the latest and greatest release of Fedora ever, Fedora 12!

Command line tricks for smart geeks

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Linux

tuxradar.com: Everyone knows the answer to the question of life, the universe and everything is "42", but for the first time we can reveal the question. It is this: how many command-line tricks must a man memorise?

Examine PHP V5.3.0 features under the microscope

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Linux

PHP is an attractive technology, that facilitates a pick-and-mix model of Web-site development. As the popular PHP language continues to evolve, many new features enhance its object-oriented aspects. In this article, PHP V5.3 examples illustrate late static binding, namespace support, class method overloading, and variable parsing and heredoc support.

10 Special Linux Distributions That You Should Know

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Linux

daniweb.com: At my last, best count, there were over 550 individual Linux distributions. From the most generic, flat installs of the most common distros to ultra-specialized, multimedia-oriented to the eye-popping, fancy ones--they're all there for the taking. I found ten distributions from among the 500 or so that I know about to spotlight these for some special feature or set of features that will dazzle you.

Linux wins the Clone Wars.

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Linux

toolbox.com/blogs/locutus: In my previous article where I compared the respective differences between windows and Linux installation I was informed that I could have avoided all of these troubles with windows by using a clone or ghost image.

The Linux consultant: The Maytag repairman of the IT world

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Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: I was enjoying football Sunday with a few fellow IT friends over the weekend. During the course of the day I pieced a few bits of conversation together and was able to finally draw a conclusion to that age old question “Why don’t more consultants roll out Linux?”

Top 3 Sites To Help You Become A Linux Command Line Master

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Linux
Web

makeuseof.com: The truth about Linux today is that one may never have to actually touch a terminal or issue a single Linux command in order to run some versions of this flexible alternative operating system. But once a user becomes accustomed to using the command line interface, it soon becomes the preferred method in many tasks.

The old vs. the new Linux desktop

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Linux

blogs.computerworld: You want to know the funniest thing is about compared Corel Linux 1.0, released in 1999, with a typical modern desktop Linux -- say, Ubuntu 9.10? How much hasn't changed.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 329

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at openSUSE 11.2
  • News: Fedora 12 hits mirrors, openSUSE releases Linux for Education, Mandriva Cooker updates X.Org and desktops to latest versions, five years of pfSense
  • Questions and answers: Why Ubuntu "fails" Shields Up port scanning and how to fix it
  • Released last week: openSUSE 11.2, sidux 2009-03
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 12
  • New additions: Salix OS, VortexBox
  • New distributions: ABC GNU/Linux, GhostBSD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

My life with Linux: the daily ups and downs of switching to open source

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Linux
Ubuntu

pcauthority.com.au: Linux is turning up in everything from netbooks to Dell PCs, but is it actually fit to replace Windows? Stuart Turton spends a week with Linux to find out.

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What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point. Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux. Fundamentally it's all about enabling the open source collaboration model for software development. "We are seeing a shift now where the majority of code in any product or service is going to be open source," Zemlin said. Zemlin added that open source is the new Pareto Principle for software development, where 80 percent of software code is open source. The nature of collaborative development itself has changed in recent years. For years the software collaboration was achieved mostly through standards organizations. Read more

Arch-based Linux distro KaOS 2014.08 is here with KDE 4.14.0

The Linux desktop community has reached a sad state. Ubuntu 14.04 was a disappointing release and Fedora is taking way too long between releases. Hell, OpenSUSE is an overall disaster. It is hard to recommend any Linux-based operating system beyond Mint. Even the popular KDE plasma environment and its associated programs are in a transition phase, moving from 4.x to 5.x. As exciting as KDE 5 may be, it is still not ready for prime-time; it is recommended to stay with 4 for now. Read more

diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

One problem with Linux has been its implementation of system calls. As Andy Lutomirski pointed out recently, it's very messy. Even identifying which system calls were implemented for which architectures, he said, was very difficult, as was identifying the mapping between a call's name and its number, and mapping between call argument registers and system call arguments. Some user programs like strace and glibc needed to know this sort of information, but their way of gathering it together—although well accomplished—was very messy too. Read more

GNU hackers discover HACIENDA government surveillance and give us a way to fight back

GNU community members and collaborators have discovered threatening details about a five-country government surveillance program codenamed HACIENDA. The good news? Those same hackers have already worked out a free software countermeasure to thwart the program. According to Heise newspaper, the intelligence agencies of the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, have used HACIENDA to map every server in twenty-seven countries, employing a technique known as port scanning. The agencies have shared this map and use it to plan intrusions into the servers. Disturbingly, the HACIENDA system actually hijacks civilian computers to do some of its dirty work, allowing it to leach computing resources and cover its tracks. Read more