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Linux 4.1 Has Improvements For The Multi-Queue Block Layer

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Linux

The latest good stuff for the Linux 4.1 kernel are the block core improvements, which mostly are focused on improving the multi-queue block layer (blk-mq).

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RaspArch Offers an Easy Way to Run Arch Linux on Raspberry Pi 2

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GNU
Linux

Arne Exton had the pleasure of informing Softpedia about a new distribution of GNU/Linux created from the ground up for the Raspberry Pi 2 tiny computer board and called RaspArch.

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The Lenovo T450s Is Working Beautifully With Linux

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

A couple weeks ago I bought the Lenovo T450s, this is my first laptop-upgrade in about three years and I have to say... I am so glad that I did upgrade. Over the last two weeks I've been using the T450s as my daily-driver and its been working almost perfectly under Fedora Linux.

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Elementary OS 0.4, Dubbed Loki, Will Come With Impressive Features

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GNU
Linux

Among others, Elementary OS 0.4 Loki will bring support for Wayland, Red Hat’s new display server, support for HiDPI high resolution displays will be implemented, AppCenter (a new Software Center) will replace the existing one.

Also, an elementary Account will be created for connecting the users with the elementary services and other elementary users, new user account pictures, improved icons and smarter audio management will be implemented, support for synchronizing system settings will be added, while automatic driver detection during installation, smarter software updates, AppArmor integration are also planned.

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Power-sipping IP camera SoC gains Linux dev kit

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Linux

Ambarella has announced the availability of a reference design for battery-powered IP cameras, supported with a Linux board support package (BSP). The design showcases the company’s recently announced, Cortex-A9 based S2Lm system-on-chip, which is specifically designed for battery-powered full HD security cameras suitable for consumer entry-level commercial security applications, says Ambarella.

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Six Clicks for Linux beginners: Ubuntu 15.04, Vivid Vervet

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Linux
Ubuntu

I've used almost every desktop on the planet, but Ubuntu 15.04 with the Unity 7 interface may be the easiest. Heck if my now 82-year-old mother-in-law can be an Ubuntu user, you can be one too!

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Egg-shaped Linux mini-PC targets emerging markets

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Linux

An “Endless Computers” Kickstarter project is pitching a Celeron-based PC for emerging markets starting at $169, featuring a new “Endless OS” Linux distro.

A San Francisco based startup called Endless Computers, is close to its $100,000 goal on Kickstarter. Funding packages for its Linux-based Endless Computer start at $169 with 32GB, moving to $189 when you add WiFi and Bluetooth. The price goes to $229 when you also add a 500GB HDD. There are also options to give computers away to poor schools and students around the world. The project closes May 15, with shipments due in June.

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Gnumeric 1.12.22 Released with ODF and XLSX Import/Export Improvements

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GNU
Linux

The Gnumeric open source spreadsheet editor used in numerous distributions of GNU/Linux, including Xubuntu and Lubuntu, received a new maintenance release today, April 17, as part of the GNOME 3.16.1 desktop environment.

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Encryptr Zero-Knowledge System Based Password Manager For Linux

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Linux
Reviews
HowTos


Encryptr zero knowledge based password manager

Encryptr is free and Open-Source password manager that is based on a very secure 'Zero-Knowledge Crypton Framework'. Zero-Knowledge system does not allow even a server to know what data is being sent and saved on the server by user. Encryptr saves all of your passwords, credit card data, PINs, or access codes, in the cloud with a simple and sleek user interface. The following tutorial instructs installing Encryptr on Ubuntu/Linux Mint or other Debian based distributions.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Why It Doesn't Matter for Linux If Windows Becomes Open Source

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Linux
Microsoft

The power of the Linux platform doesn't reside in the fact that it's open source, although it does play an important part. It's all about the community of developers who want to make things better, and most of the time they don't want anything in return, other than recognition for their work. This is not something that you see in the Windows dev community that aims to make money.

Also, Linux is a great platform because there are hundreds of distros out there. Some might think this is a weakness, but it's not. Great ideas found and implemented in one project will eventually land in all the others. Innovation is encouraged and often recognized by most of the other developers.

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Security Leftovers

  • One-stop counterfeit certificate shops for all your malware-signing needs

    The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program almost a decade ago was a watershed piece of malware for a variety of reasons. Chief among them, its use of cryptographic certificates belonging to legitimate companies to falsely vouch for the trustworthiness of the malware. Last year, we learned that fraudulently signed malware was more widespread than previously believed. On Thursday, researchers unveiled one possible reason: underground services that since 2011 have sold counterfeit signing credentials that are unique to each buyer.

  • How did OurMine hackers use DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks? [Ed: False. They did not attack Wikileaks; they attacked the DNS servers/framework. The corporate media misreported this at the time.
    The OurMine hacking group recently used DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks and take over its web address. Learn how this attack was performed from expert Nick Lewis.
  • Intel didn't give government advance notice on chip flaws

    Google researchers informed Intel of flaws in its chips in June. The company explained in its own letter to lawmakers that it left up to Intel informing the government of the flaws.

    Intel said that it did not notify the government at the time because it had “no indication of any exploitation by malicious actors,” and wanted to keep knowledge of the breach limited while it and other companies worked to patch the issue.

    The company let some Chinese technology companies know about the vulnerabilities, which government officials fear may mean the information was passed along to the Chinese government, according to The Wall Street Journal.

  • Intel hid CPU bugs info from govt 'until public disclosure'

    As iTWire reported recently, Intel faces a total of 33 lawsuits over the two flaws. Additionally, the Boston law firm of Block & Leviton is preparing a class action lawsuit against Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich for allegedly selling a vast majority of his Intel stock after the company was notified of the two security flaws and before they became public.

  • Intel did not tell U.S. cyber officials about chip flaws until made public [iophk: "yeah right"]

    Current and former U.S. government officials have raised concerns that the government was not informed of the flaws before they became public because the flaws potentially held national security implications. Intel said it did not think the flaws needed to be shared with U.S. authorities as hackers [sic] had not exploited the vulnerabilities.

  • LA Times serving cryptocurrency mining script [iophk: "JS"]

    The S3 bucket used by the LA Times is apparently world-writable and an ethical hacker [sic] appears to have left a warning in the repository, warning of possible misuse and asking the owner to secure the bucket.

  • Facebook's Mandatory Malware Scan Is an Intrusive Mess

    When an Oregon science fiction writer named Charity tried to log onto Facebook on February 11, she found herself completely locked out of her account. A message appeared saying she needed to download Facebook’s malware scanner if she wanted to get back in. Charity couldn’t use Facebook until she completed the scan, but the file the company provided was for a Windows device—Charity uses a Mac.

  • Tinder plugs flaw that enabled account takeover using just a phone number

    As Tinder uses Facebook profile pics for its users to lure in a mate or several, the 'dating' app is somewhat tied to the social network. When a swipe-hungry Tinder user comes to login to their account they can either do so via Facebook or use their mobile number.

  • `

Android Leftovers