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Linux

Beautiful Mangaka Linux Is Based on Ubuntu 14.04, Designed for Anime and Manga Fans

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Animesoft International, the developers of the Mangaka Project, an Ubuntu-based Linux distribution designed primarily for fans of Japanese anime and manga, have announced a new Alpha release of the next major version of the distro.

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For AMD Users, Linux 4.2 Will Bring The New AMDGPU Driver & VCE1 For Radeon

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Alex Deucher of AMD has filed his main pull request today for the Radeon DRM driver updates to be integrated in the upcoming Linux 4.2 kernel.

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IPFire 2.17 Update 90 Gets GeoIP-Based Blocking, Legacy Microsoft Hyper-V Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

The IPFire team had the pleasure of announcing earlier today, May 28, the immediate availability for download of IPFire 2.17 Core Update 90, a major version that brings a number of new features, updated packages, a new kernel, and various security enhancements.

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ALT Linux 7.0.5 Arrives with Active Directory Support and Linux Kernel 3.14.41 LTS

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Linux

Andrei Cherepanov had the great pleasure of informing us about the immediate availability for download of the fifth maintenance release of the Russian ALT Linux 7.0 operating system.

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An About.com Review Of Bodhi Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Bodhi Linux is a distribution I have followed for a number of years. I used to have it installed on my Acer Aspire Netbook and it featured in my list of "12 great distributions for netbooks" article that I wrote back in October 2013.

The point of Bodhi Linux is to get out of your way and let you decide which applications are installed on your computer.

I gave my previous review of Bodhi Linux the title "Quick but Quirky".

The reason for that title was that the desktop whilst whizzing along quite nicely had a few strange Enlightenment-isms which would have made it a probably no-no for beginners.

How does the latest version measure up? Read on and find out.

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Security and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

Five Reasons to Use Linux

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Linux

Quite simply, most of us use desktop Linux because it’s superior to all other brands, including Windows and OS X — even including Unix and the BSDs. This is a fact, not an opinion. There are reasons why Linux runs a majority of the worlds servers and powers most big enterprises, and in an example of where the trickle down theory actually works, those reasons trickle down (or up — depending on your viewpoint) to the desktop.

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Freescale pumps out three new Linux-friendly i.MX6 SoCs

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Linux

Freescale’s dual- and quad-core “Plus” i.MX6 SoCs boost graphic performance and RAM support, while the single-core Cortex-A7 “UltraLite” targets secure IoT.

Freescale Semiconductor announced three new versions of its popular i.MX6 SoCs, all of which will be backed with Linux BSPs and evaluation kits. The new i.MX6 DualPlus and i.MX6 QuadPlus system-on-chips offer optimized GPUs and memory support, but keep the same 21 x 21mm packages, and remain with the same allotment of Cortex-A9 cores. They offer full software and pin compatibility with earlier i.MX6 models, says Freescale.

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10 of the most popular lightweight Linux distros

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Modern Linux distros are designed to appeal to a large number of users. As a result, they have become too bloated for older machines or systems with limited resources. If you don't have several gig of RAM to spare and an extra core or two, these distros may not deliver the best performance for you. Thankfully, there are many lightweight distros that you can use to breathe new life into older hardware.

But there's one caveat when working with lightweight distros - they usually manage to function with limited resources by cutting away just about everything you take for granted, such as wizards and scripts which make everyday tasks easier.

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Running Linux On The Intel Compute Stick

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The Intel Compute Stick has begun shipping, a tiny device that plugs into any HDMI TV or monitor and turns it into a fully-functioning computer. This low-power PC ships with Windows 8.1 or Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, though at the moment the Windows version is first to market with the Ubuntu Compute Stick not widely shipping until June. I have an Intel Compute Stick at Phoronix for testing.

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More in Tux Machines

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more