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Linux

Munich sticks with Free Software

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GNU
Linux
OSS

On Tuesday, Munich's first mayor finally reacted to an inquiry by the Green Party (in German) related to rumours regarding a possible switch back to a Windows-based desktop environment. The answer to the inquiry shows that there is no factual basis for the claims made by first mayor and second mayor. An evaluation of the IT infrastructure and -processes is underway. FSFE calls on the city council to include vendor independence as well as interoperability as factors in the investigation, since they were central reasons for Munich to switch to Free Software in the first place.

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Do-It-Yourself Linux Machine

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GNU
Linux

What ARC does have is Linux support. In fact, Synopsys’s brand new ARC HS38 processor supports both “standard” single-core and SMP multicore implementations of Linux, something a bit new and unusual in the DIY processor arena. So just because you’ve rolled your own processor hardware doesn’t mean you have to give up on familiar operating systems.

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Linux-Turned-FreeBSD Distro Comes Up With A New Software License

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Linux
BSD

While the likes of SprezzOS as the "most beautiful and performant" Linux and OSu as the ultimate operating system have disappeared at the end of the day and are no longer providing comic relief or interesting ambitious debates to Linux users, that other distribution based on Ubuntu and then turned into a FreeBSD distribution is still standing. They're out with an update today and have introduced their own open-source license.

The OS being talked about here for today's after-hours forum discussion fodder is Jabir OS, the operating system that now claims to be an independent fork of FreeBSD and most recently they've been trying to make their own operating system GUI.

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Open source startup targeting DevOps-defined networking

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GNU
Linux
OSS

A software startup debuted this week proposing software-defined networking to Docker, the open source software for creating Linux application virtualization containers.

SocketPlane was founded by former Cisco, Red Hat, HP, OpenDaylight and Dell officials. In the open source world, their names are well known: Madhu Venugopal, John Willis, Brent Salisbury and Dave Tucker.

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Also:

  • SDN News: Flexible NEC Pricing, HP Cloud, Industry Predictions and More

    The above are just a sampling of this week's SDN and NFV news, attesting to the industry interest in the emerging technologies, interest that was further evidenced by yesterday's announcement from Dell'Oro Group that SDN datacenter sales will grow more than 65 percent this year. "With architectures ratified and production deployments under way, network security appliances and Ethernet switches will continue to comprise the majority of SDN's impact, with SDN gaining a foothold outside of the major cloud providers," the research firm said while hawking a for-sale report.

  • Setting the SDN Agenda

    So what are going to be the hot topics of debate this week? I've been here a day, sitting in on the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) workshop and chatting to a number of companies with a vested interest in SDN's future success, and there are a number of debates likely to rage all week:

Is open source really harder work? Munich's experience shows it's more complicated than that

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Georg Greve is CEO of Kolab Systems, the company that recently began implementing groupware software to manage mail, calendar, task, and contact lists for the council.

The reason the mayor was unable to access email through his smartphone is due to how a legacy server had been set up, he explained, and would still have been a problem if the council had stuck with Microsoft.

"They had a system in place which was a plain old mail system, an IMAP server, the same system they've been using for a very long time," he said.

"It's behind a firewall and the firewall is configured in a way that a mobile phone shouldn't be able to access it, because all of this goes back to pre-mobile phone days.

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Linus Torvalds Regrets Alienating Developers with Strong Language

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Linux

Linus Torvalds talked today at LinuxCon and CloudOpen Europe, a conference organized by the Linux Foundation that reunites all the big names in the open source world. He answered a lot of questions and he also talked about the effects of the strong language he uses in the mailing list.

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Munich sheds light on the cost of dropping Linux and returning to Windows

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

No return to using Windows as the main desktop OS is planned, but the council is intending to conduct a study to see which operating systems and software packages - both proprietary and open source - best fit its needs. The audit would also take into account the work already carried out to move the council to free software.

Now in a response to Munich's Green Party the mayor Dieter Reiter has revealed the cost of returning to Windows.

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Linux Mint 17 Now Has a Better Update Manager

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Linux

Most of the update managers used today by various distributions, including Ubuntu and Linux Mint, give way too much information to the user by default. Most people don't really want to know every last library or dependency that is updated, and if it's a bigger package, the amount of information presented is sometimes way too much.

To be fair, the Update Manager for Linux Mint has already improved tremendously in the last couple of years and it's one of the best out there. It has simple and clear information about what's being updated, but it looks like there is still room for improvement.

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R.I.P. Reader: Examining Adobe's history of disdain towards Linux users

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Linux
Software

Linux users have recently been celebrating the arrival of an official Photoshop for Linux— yup, once Adobe’s Photoshop-streaming-via-Creative-Cloud is out of beta for Chrome, Linux users will be able to use Photoshop in an official way.

But Adobe hasn’t suddenly fallen in love with Linux. In fact, whatever support they provide for Linux seems purely coincidental. Adobe has been going out of their way to kill their consumer Linux software in the past few years: Reader, Flash, and AIR for Linux have all been axed.

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Slideshow: The Linux Community Celebrates Ada Lovelace Day

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Linux
OSS

In celebrating Ada Lovelace, we recognize all of the women who were, and continue to be, pioneers and contributors in the advancement of computer science. In honor of the day, we asked Linux community members attending LinuxCon and CloudOpen Europe this week to show their appreciation by sporting Ada Lovelace pins during the conference. We captured a few of them in this slideshow.

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Also: Women in Open Source award open for nominations

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More in Tux Machines

KDE's Plasma 5.10.4 in Chakra GNU/Linux

15 ways to empower students with open source tools

Recently I read the fascinating book Empower: What Happens When Students Own Their Own Learning, by John Spencer and A.J. Juliani. The book led me to think more deeply about my teaching methods and how I like to learn. I think learning should be exciting, and I'm happiest when I'm actively engaged in what I'm doing. Why wouldn't students in our schools want anything different than that? And why aren't we doing more to give that experience to them? While many schools today have a 1:1 ratio of computers/tablets to students, most of them use platforms and software that allow little (if any) modification. Students can't tinker with the software or hardware. Yet tinkering and experimenting are at the heart of learning. The authors of Empower say that students in environments that foster "making" take ownership of their learning more readily and tend to be deeper thinkers who are more at home with frustration. Ultimately, they wrote, "makers are better equipped for life." Read more

Red Hat Upgrade and Insider Selling

OSS: Yandex, The Open Source Way, Machine Learning, and BSD

  • In Other API Economy News: Yandex Open Source Machine Learning Library and More
    We start your weekend off with a review of the stories we couldn’t cover with a look at what what going on in the world of APIs. We start off with news that Yandex, the Russian search engine company, has announced that they are open-sourcing CatBoost, a machine learning library. The library is based on gradient boosting, a machine learning technique described by TechCrunch as being “designed to help “teach” systems when you have a very sparse amount of data, and especially when the data may not all be sensorial (such as audio, text or imagery), but includes transactional or historical data, too.” Yandex is freely releasing CatBoost for anyone to use under an Apache License. This move is similar to what we saw from Google when they open sourced TensorFlow in late 2015. As the demand for artificial intelligence solutions backed by machine learning platforms continues to grow, moves like this serve to help a wide range of developers take advantage of the technology.
  • CatBoost: Yandex's machine learning algorithm is available free of charge
  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community. Additionally, as organizations, especially government, continue to emerge from the technology funding embargo of the Great (2008) Recession - an economic force that froze IT purchases and programs and forced many into strict “keep the lights on” operational mode, IT managers and CIO’s are carefully expending their still relatively measly budgets. [...] For IT organizations, especially government, with limited budgets and long procurement processes, time and increased experience with open source products will lead to a growing understanding and acceptance. And as this understanding progresses and becomes more accepted, open source will become a “go to” option to keep up with the fast moving technical environment, and perhaps eventually, as a standard first option, realizing the broader set of open source values by relying on the collective work and minds of a virtual community of IT “hackers”, “geeks” and “nerds”, working globally, 24x7/365 to explore, develop and showcase whatever tech that sparks their individual interest.
  • Top 5 open-source tools for machine learning

    Given the paradigmatic shifts that a true revolution in machine learning could bring, it’s important to maintain tech’s devotion to open-source. These kinds of scientific advancement don’t belong to any one company or corporation, but to the whole world. Making ML open and evenly distributed means everyone can join in this revolution.

  • Release of TinySegmenter 0.3
    Today I released version 0.3 of TinySegmenter, a Japanese Tokenizer in pure Python (released in New BSD license), with a single minor fix for proper install on systems not-using UTF-8 (apparently that still exists! :P). Thanks to Mišo Belica for the patch. Apparently some of his Japanese users are using it for Sumy, his software to extract summary from texts.
  • BSDTW 2017 CFP
     

    BSDTW 2017 will be held on the 11th and 12th of November 2017 (Sat/Sun), in Taipei. We are now requesting proposals for talks. We do not require academic or formal papers. If you wish to submit a formal paper, you are welcome to, but it is not required.

    The talks should be written with strong technical content. Presentations on the use of BSD in products and companies are strongly encouraged but marketing proposals are not appropriate for this venue.