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$5 Linux-equipped Omega2 IoT module launches on Kickstarter

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Linux

Onion launched an “Omega2” module on Kickstarter, featuring a faster CPU, options for double the RAM and flash, and lower pricing than last year’s Omega.

Last year, Onion launched an extremely successful Kickstarter campaign for the original Omega module, with packages starting at $25. That campaign won $267,851 from 4,459 backers. Today, the company returned to the Kickstarter well seeking support for a version 2 follow-on to the Omega, appropriately dubbed Omega2. The new project has already reached more than 90 percent of its $15,000 funding goal — a modest feat, in light of the quarter of a million dollars last year’s project earned.

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Four Alternatives to Raspbian and Ubuntu MATE

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Linux
Ubuntu

It seems like every article one reads about the Raspberry Pi always makes a reference to Raspbian. If not, then the writer will probably write about how wonderful Ubuntu MATE is on the Raspberry Pi. Which begs the question: Are there any other OS options for the Raspberry Pi? While there’s nothing wrong with either distro, we should remember that the main appeal of using Linux is the freedom and amount of choice that is offered to the user. With that being said, here are four other distros that offer a great user experience on the Raspberry Pi.

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How To Upgrade to Linux Mint 18

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Linux

Clement Lefebvre and the Linux Mint Development Team promised to come up with an in-place upgrade solution for those who are currently running Linux Mint 17.3 “Rosa.” Well, it is here and it does seem to work quite well. In this article and video, we’ll talk a bit about the pros and cons of in-place upgrades. You’ll also get to see the upgrade in action from beginning to end.

Coin-sized COM could be world’s smallest Raspberry Pi clone

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Linux

ArduCam unveiled a 24 x 24mm module with the ARM11-based core of the original Raspberry Pi, available with 36 x 36mm carriers with one or two camera links.

The promised second-generation version of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module featuring the same quad-core, 64-bit Broadcom BCM2837 SoC as the Raspberry Pi 3 will be out within a few months, according to a recent PC World interview with Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Eben Upton. Meanwhile, if you’re looking for a smaller computer-on-module version of the Raspberry Pi and are willing to settle for the old ARM11 foundation available on the current Raspberry Pi Compute Module, ArduCam could have you covered sooner.

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Can you name these Linux distributions?

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Linux

Linux is turning 25 this year. Since its inception in 1991, what started as a "modest new OS" has ballooned into a juggernaut with 258 distributions.

To celebrate Linix's big birthday, I have gathered together 25 pictorial representations of Linux distributions. Given a visual clue and a very brief description, how many of the Linux distributions represented here can you identify?

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​The best Linux laptop: The 2016 Dell XPS 13

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GNU
Linux

Make no mistake about it. The 2016 Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop is wonderful. It's fast, its display is gorgeous, and, at less than three pounds, you can carry and code with it anywhere. But, oh, that price tag!

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Also: Hands-on with the Linux-ready Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition

Respinning Linux

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Linux

It started back in 2009, the first year of Lynn Bender’s fantastic brainstorm “Linux Against Poverty.” Lynn’s idea and subsequent involvement with our organization, then named The HeliOS Project, would infuse our effort with an energy and inventory we still rely on today.

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Linux Kernel/Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Top 6 Desktop Linux Blunders

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Linux

Ever since I first tried Linux on my desktop years ago, I've found myself wincing at what I felt were avoidable blunders. This observation doesn't affect one distro more than another, rather it's ongoing issues I've watch in utter amazement happen time and time again.

No, I'm not giving a free pass to proprietary operating systems as they also have their share of epic blunder moments. But with Linux on the desktop, I guess you could say it just hits a bit closer to home. Remember, these are not merely bugs – I'm also talking about avoidable issues that affect folks even if they don't realize it.

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A Linux Kernel Wizard’s Adventures in Embedded Hardware

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Linux

Sometimes the best tutorials come not from experts, but from proficient newcomers who are up to date on the latest entry-level technologies and can remember what it’s like to be a newbie. It also helps if, like Grant Likely, the teacher is a major figure in embedded Linux who understands how hardware is ignited by software.

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10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more