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Linux

Q4OS – A Fast & Powerful Open-Source Windows-Like OS

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GNU
Linux

Q4OS is an open source Debian-based distro that boasts a UI similar to that of Windows XP and Windows 7 straight out of the box. It focuses on long-term stability, security, speed, and reliability.

Q4OS was created not too long before Microsoft ended support for Windows XP on April 8, 2014. After this period many Windows users who had not completely transitioned from XP were forced to use workstations that were vulnerable to security threats, app bugs, and general unreliability.

The dev team tagged it “the right desktop for your business” and they have their commercial support feature to back it up – they are ready to provide client support by helping users with system modifications, UI customization, and core level API programming. The OS also does a good job of working with virtual cloud environments and that’s thanks to its low hardware requirements.

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Linux 4.18 Set To Receive Scheduler Optimization For vCPUs

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Linux

The Linux kernel scheduler optimization work continues and it looks like for Linux 4.18 there will be at least another optimization to help out vCPUs in a virtualized environment.

Rohit Jain of Oracle sent in a patch this week that is already queued as part of scheduler work for the next kernel series, Linux 4.18. The patch is sched/core: Don't schedule threads on pre-empted vCPUs.

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Raspberry Pi CM3 based touch-panel computer starts at $113

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Linux

Acme has launched a rugged, 22mm thick “CM3-Panel” 7-inch capacitive touch-panel computer built around a Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3. Four models are available: WiFi, USB, WiFi and 868MHz Yarm RF, or USB and Yarm.

Acme has followed up on last December’s CM3-Home home automation carrier board for the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 with a 7-inch touch-panel computer built around the RPi CM3. The open spec CM3-Panel is less than 22mm thick and supports -20 to 70° temperatures. It’s available in four different models, including two with modules that support Acme’s open source 868MHz Yarm RF radio module spec.

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How a university network assistant used Linux in the 90s

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Linux

In the mid-1990s, I was enrolled in computer science classes. My university’s computer science department provided a SunOS server—a multi-user, multitasking Unix system—for its students. We logged into it and wrote source code for the programming languages we were learning, such as C, C++, and ADA. In those days, well before social networks and instant messaging, we also used the system to communicate with each other, sending emails and using utilities such as write and talk. We were each also allowed to host a personal website. I enjoyed being able to complete my assignments and contact other users.

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Absolute Linux Offers Old School Charm, Thanks to Slackware

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Linux
Slack
HowTos

What this means is that, within the Linux landscape, you can find a distribution that perfectly fits your needs and your penchant. If you want something ultra-modern, you can install any distribution that features either GNOME or KDE Plasma. If you want something moderately modern, take a look at Elementary OS, or any distribution featuring the Budgie Desktop (or Mate or Cinnamon). But what if your desktop desires are rooted in something from the past? Say Windows XP? Believe it or not, there are plenty of distributions that cater to those who long for the days of yore, when the desktop metaphor trended toward the simple Microsoftian look and feel.

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GNU/Linux on Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Chrome OS Canary begins testing Linux app support ahead of Google I/O

    First uncovered by ChromeUnboxed a few months ago, the Chrome OS team seems to be working towards Linux app compatibility. Yesterday, the settings menu was found to be updated in Chrome OS Canary with a new option that confirms the exciting change.

    The option says “Run Linux tools, editors, and IDEs on your Chromebook,” and indicates targeting a market that has been so far mostly untapped on Chromebooks: developers.

    Humorously, the codename for this feature — Crostini — is basically a big fancy crouton. Google seems to be willing to admit that the OS truly needs the features that Crouton brings to the table, but without the instability that currently comes with it.

  • Linux app support going live on Chrome OS Dev channel

    The first evidence of Linux application support on Chrome OS appeared in February, and more details have continued to trickle out since. Earlier this month, a Terminal app began appearing on Chrome OS Dev, confirming that "your favorite native apps and command-line tools" would be supported. Google has also been working on its own GTK theme, so Linux apps feel right at home on Chrome OS.

  • System76 have announced a new Oryx Pro laptop model and it's a bit of a beast

    Linux hardware vendor System76 [Official Site] (and now a Linux distribution maker too) have just announced their new Oryx Pro laptop and it's a beast.

Linux Apps Are Coming to Chromebooks and You Can Try Them Right Now, Here's How

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Rumored to come to a Chromebook near you, support for Linux apps just entered beta testing in the latest Chrome OS Dev channel, as confirmed by Kevin Tofel of About Chromebooks. The feature appeared in the Settings and needed to be turned on if you want to use Linux tools, editors, and IDEs on your Chromebook.

The first sign of Linux app support in Chrome OS appeared two months ago when a Reddit user discovered a Chromium Gerrit commit explaining a new device policy designed to allow containerized Linux apps to Chromebooks. Then, someone discovered a Terminal app, whichfailed to install, but suggested upcoming support for Linux apps.

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First Arch Linux ISO Snapshot Powered by Linux Kernel 4.16 Is Here

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Linux

The Arch Linux 2018.05.01 snapshot for May 2018 is here, and it's the first to be powered by the Linux 4.16 kernel series, which brings mitigations for Meltdown and both variants of the Spectre vulnerabilities for ARM64 (AArch64) architectures, as well as Spectre mitigations for IBM System z (s390) architectures.

Linux kernel 4.16 also updates numerous drivers for best-in-class hardware support, and adds various improvements to existing features, such as KVM (Kernel-based virtual machine) support for AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization, Memory Protection Keys support for the POWER architecture, and others.

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Kernel and Graphics in Phoronix

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • MIPS Shows Off Their New Linux Kernel Port To nanoMIPS

    Earlier this week MIPS Technologies announced their new MIPS I7200 processor core built on the new nanoMIPS ISA. A day after they unveiled their new GCC port to this much-changed nanoMIPS instruction set and now today they sent out their initial Linux kernel patch for bringing up this new MIPS version that is coming with a new/updated kernel ABI.

    Given the binary incompatibility to existing MIPS architecture generations, developers at MIPS Technologies took this time to also improve the compiler ABI, modernize the Linux user ABI for nanoMIPS, make more use of generic kernel interfaces, etc.

  • The Shiny New Features Of X.Org Server 1.20

    With the release of the long-awaited X.Org Server 1.20 finally being imminent, here is a look at the many features that were merged over the past year and a half for this long drawn out release process. While more of the Linux desktop continues moving towards Wayland, X.Org Server continues evolving as shown by the 1.20 release and as part of that is also plenty on the XWayland side.

  • Intel ANV Vulkan Driver Lands shaderInt16 Support

    As of this morning Intel's "ANV" open-source Vulkan driver now has 16-bit integer support for shaders (shaderInt16) as one more feature to cross-off the TODO list.

    Igalia's Iago Toral Quiroga has landed his patch series wiring up shaderInt16 support for the Intel Vulkan Linux driver. The 16-bit int support for shaders is supported with Broadwell "Gen 8" graphics hardware and newer.

  • MIPS Rolls Out New I7200 Processor Core Using New nanoMIPS ISA

    MIPS Technologies has unveiled a new processor and one that is built on nanoMIPS, a significantly redesigned MIPS instruction set architecture and the first major product launch since Imagination Technologies sold off MIPS last year.

Scientific Linux 7.5 Release Candidate Arrives

Filed under
Linux

Following last month's release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5, the Scientific Linux community is preparing to release their re-based downstream of RHEL.

RHEL 7.5 brings the Permabit Virtual Data Optimizer, better Windows infrastructure integration, full support for Buildah, and various other improvements.

Scientific Linux 7.5 re-bases its packages against the source packages of the upstream RHEL 7.5. In the process they have also updated OpenAFS, fixed an Anaconda installer crash, and also no longer package NetworkManager for their i686 build.

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Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.