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The New Features To The Linux 3.16 Kernel

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Linux

Linus Torvalds will most likely be releasing the Linux 3.16-rc1 kernel today, now that the merge window has been open for two weeks and the feature pull requests are coming to an end. Here's a concise look at the new features and improvements to be found with the Linux 3.16 kernel.

All of the major subsystems with updates for the Linux 3.16 merge window appear to now be addressed and Linux 3.16-rc1 is likely hours away. As I'm about to leave for Russia again, I'm writing my summary of the features I'm most interested in with the Linux 3.16 kernel and other changes/improvements that you as Phoronix readers will also be most pleased to see with this new kernel stabilizing over the summer.

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Linux Mint 17 “Qiana” Xfce RC released!

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GNU
Linux

Linux Mint 17 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

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Windows: Another nail in the coffin?

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

That system is Wine, a software “go-between” that lets users run Windows applications without a copy of Microsoft Windows. Wine isn’t an operating system in its own right, just a layer that sits on top of free systems like Linux. It doesn’t run every Windows program but offers seamless compatibility on many of the most recent and popular applications. Used in conjunction with a free graphical operating system like Ubuntu, it’s an option that could save you up to £80 on Microsoft’s current asking price.

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Recovering Linux after catastrophic deletion

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GNU
Linux
HowTos

A recurring Linux joke / horror story is running the command rm –rf /. Imagine if it actually happened? What would or could you do to recover?

Linux specialist Kyle Kelley recently decided to see what happened if he launched a new Linux server and ran rm –rf / as root.

This command is the remove (delete) command, with the flags –rf indicating to run recursively down all folders and subfolders, and to force deletion even if the file is ordinarily read-only. The / indicates the command is to run from the top-most root directory in Linux.

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Linux 2D Performance: Nouveau vs. NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

After last weekend delivering 30-way Intel/AMD/NVIDIA 2D Linux benchmarks this weekend I have some results comparing the GeForce GPU performance for 2D operations between the open-source Nouveau driver and the closed-source proprietary NVIDIA Linux driver.

All testing happened from the same Intel Core i7 4770K system running Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit. The Nouveau stack was powered by the Linux 3.15 kernel, Mesa 10.3-devel, and xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.10. The proprietary NVIDIA Linux graphics driver stack was the NVIDIA 337.25 proprietary driver running on Linux 3.13.

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Linux gaming rising: 7 big-name PC games that now call Linux home

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Linux
Gaming

Linux's gaming potential is about more than SteamOS and blockbuster ports. Earlier this year, GOG.com announced plans to bring a bevy of classic games to Ubuntu and Mint Linux this fall, with more than 100 games expected to be available at launch. Expect them to work just fine with SteamOS when the operating system finally launches sometime in 2015, too.

Speaking of Steam, it's not the big-name games but the indies that are driving Steam for Linux's true growth. After launching with a mere 60 native games just over a year ago, Steam for Linux now stands at more than 300 games strong—tremendous growth in a very short time. More and more games—like Europa Universalis IV, and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, and Dota 2, and Starbound—are starting to launch Linux versions alongside Windows counterparts.

It's still not quite the year of Linux on the desktop, but one thing's for certain: Linux's gaming prospects are looking brighter than ever before.

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HP's The Machine kicks Microsoft to the curb in favor of Linux

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Linux
Microsoft

My how the times have changed. At one point, HP and Microsoft were sharing friendship bracelets and having slumber parties. In fact, over the last decade, HP was a major player with Microsoft. Those days are gone. The juggernaut that was once Microsoft is slowly toppling and companies like HP are seeing the writing on the wall. That writing includes the likes of Android, Linux, iOS -- platforms perfect for mobile and embedded systems.

To that end, Hewlett Packard has decided to kick Microsoft to the curb and develop their own operating system that will power all of their future devices. In particular, HP is working on a device they call "The Machine." This new device will be made up of several new technologies -- including a new type of memory -- and will run a new operating system based on...

Wait for it...

Linux.

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The People Who Support Linux: Engineer Thanks Father for His Linux Career

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Software engineer Thomas Gibbons remembers from an early age working with his father to set up mail servers in their home in Kidderminster, England. His dad, Christopher Gibbons, a BT (British Telecom) engineer, was always eager to teach him about things he expressed interested in, he said via phone this week.

“He got me into programming as well. I'm where I am today because of my father's faith in me,” Gibbons said. “Whenever I wanted to learn something, he said 'Great, we'll learn it together.”

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Open Linux stack for Nvidia Jetson SBC taps new Linux 3.15

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Linux

Codethink demonstrated its Baserock Linux stack running the new Linux 3.15 kernel and an open source graphics driver stack on Nvidia’s Jetson TK1 SBC.

Codethink ported Baserock with the new Linux kernel to the Jetson in 24 hours to promote its Linux stack’s workflow tools while also showing off the capabilities of Nvidia’s open source Linux development board. “This shows what’s possible with the right people working on a fully open source software stack with Baserock,” stated Paul Sherwood, CEO of Manchester, UK-based Codethink. “Linux 3.15 was released late Sunday in California. We got our board on Monday. James started the work on Tuesday. By Wednesday we had a fully working system, with wayland and weston running EGL clients using totally open technologies.”

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Tizen based Samsung NX1, 28MP sensor camera to launch in September?

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Linux

Samsung have delivered several Tizen powered Smart cameras and now according to a new leak, they are getting ready to deliver another Tizen based flagship model named the Samsung NX1. The expected announcement of this new Camera is thought to be at the Photokina event in September.

Specification wise we are looking at a 28-megapixel APS-C sensor (compatible with existing NX lenses), which is an upgrade over the 20.3MP sensor that is in the current flagship NX30 camera. Video recording has also be upgraded to the new 4k video format (suggesting that a Snapdragon 80x chipset might powering it).

You will also see Samsung launching a NX 50-150mm f/2.8 optical image stabilization-enabled lens, but there is no news if this will be offered in a kit form bundled with the NX1.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Still at It

5 open source RSS feed readers

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds. And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too. Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use
    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity
    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.
  • Gammu 1.38.2
    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations. The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.
  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics
    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow. In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.
  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn
    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?
    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.