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Just talk

Gltron on the BIG screen

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Just talk

Oh man, I was getting the yen to play gltron and went to the site to check out the latest and greatest on it when I saw this post:

Gltron on the 'big screen'. "Pablo Veramendi got GLtron running across 12 monitors. Amazing."

daaaaaang! 12 monitors! I wish he had posted his howto! Big Grin

May Enlightenment

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I installed kde cvs a week or so back after posting my Month with Fluxbox - Part 2, yet I always seemed to choose fluxbox when it came time to log into X. I very much enjoyed running fluxbox, but I'm gonna run enlightment during May and see how it goes.

Neato Pic

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My sister sent me this Kincaid gif this morning. I thought it was kinda neato so I figured I'd share. It don't have anything to do with anything, but...

Weird *ss Weather

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You'd think after living in TN for 25 years, no make that 35 years, I'd be used to this weird weather. One saying that's become cliche around here is 'If you don't like the weather, just wait a few minutes - it'll change'. Yet it never seems to cease to amaze me. It's been raining here for several days now, it was raining when I went to bed last night and a thunderstorm awoke me this morning. This thunderstorm was a little spookier than most because the sky had taken on this eerie greenish-yellowish cast. Well, we practically-native Tennesseans know that's one of the warning signs of tornado activity, another thing we should be used to by now.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos and programming

  • How to Install Postman on Debian 10
  • freshclam[15552]: Can’t create temporary directory /var/lib/clamav/clamav-969944fd9a258fa7aff08976496d8541.tmp
  • 30 Linux Permissions Exercises for Sysadmins
  • How to Check Linux Mint Version Number & Codename
  • Four semanage commands to keep SELinux in enforcing mode
  • How to start developing with .NET [Ed: Red Hat has totally lost it. It promotes Microsoft.]
  • Constraint programming by example

    There are many different ways to solve problems in computing. You might "brute force" your way to a solution by calculating as many possibilities as you can, or you might take a procedural approach and carefully establish the known factors that influence the correct answer. In constraint programming, a problem is viewed as a series of limitations on what could possibly be a valid solution. This paradigm can be applied to effectively solve a group of problems that can be translated to variables and constraints or represented as a mathematic equation. In this way, it is related to the Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP). Using a declarative programming style, it describes a general model with certain properties. In contrast to the imperative style, it doesn't tell how to achieve something, but rather what to achieve. Instead of defining a set of instructions with only one obvious way to compute values, constraint programming declares relationships between variables within constraints. A final model makes it possible to compute the values of variables regardless of direction or changes. Thus, any change in the value of one variable affects the whole system (i.e., all other variables), and to satisfy defined constraints, it leads to recomputing the other values.

  • Samuel Sutch: Why Python Has Become an Industry Favorite Among Programmers

    With the world stepping towards a new age of technology development, it isn’t hard to imagine a future that will be full of screens. And if so be the case then, demand for people with strong programming skills will definitely rise with more number of people required to develop and support the applications. Python Training is always a good idea for those wishes to be a part of this constantly developing industry. Python language is not only easy to grasp, but emphasizes less on syntax which is why a few mistakes here and there doesn’t give as much trouble as some other languages does.

Linux commands to display your hardware information

There are many reasons you might need to find out details about your computer hardware. For example, if you need help fixing something and post a plea in an online forum, people will immediately ask you for specifics about your computer. Or, if you want to upgrade your computer, you'll need to know what you have and what you can have. You need to interrogate your computer to discover its specifications. Alternatively, you could open up the box and read the labels on the disks, memory, and other devices. Or you could enter the boot-time panels—the so-called UEFI or BIOS panels. Just hit the proper program function key during the boot process to access them. These two methods give you hardware details but omit software information. Or, you could issue a Linux line command. Wait a minute… that sounds difficult. Why would you do this? Read more

Android Leftovers

BlackWeb 1.2

BlackWeb is a penetration and security testing distribution based on Debian. The project's website presents the distribution's features as follows: BlackWeb is a Linux distribution aimed at advanced penetration testing and security auditing. BlackWeb contains several hundred tools which are geared towards various information security tasks, such as penetration testing, security research, computer forensics and reverse engineering. Starting from an appropriately configured LXDE desktop manager it offers stability and speed. BlackWeb has been designed with the aim of achieving the maximum performance and minimum consumption of resources. There are 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds of BlackWeb available on the distribution's website. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is 2.6GB in size. Booting from the media brings up a menu asking if we would like to try BlackWeb's live desktop, run the installer or run the graphical installer. Taking the live desktop options presents us with a graphical login screen where we can sign in with the username "root" and the password "blackweb". Read more