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2011 - Has Internet TV really moved forward, can you really cut the cable?

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Back in 2008 I wrote a blog post about the state of Internet TV at the time, which was fairly well received. nearly 4 years on its time to re-assess the state of Internet TV.

Since 2008 when Internet based TV was really just starting the landscape has really changed, gone in a large proportion of the examples I gave they were very much Windows focussed. However the device landscape itself has changed hugely since 2008. Mainly due to the iPad and Android platforms, what is available has become platform agnostic, which has made the whole concept of cutting the cable and going internet only far easier.

As a Linux user is this easier or harder than it was in 2008?

Read More:
http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/2011-has-internet-tv-really-moved.html

ChromeOS in VirtualBox

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Took a little break tonight from compiling 64bit PCLinuxOS packages. I took a peek at ChromeOS in Virtualbox. Pretty much the Chrome browser with a login screen and additional settings. Wanna play with ChromeOS in Virtualbox then you can get a vanilla image from the link below.

http://hexxeh.net/?p=328117684

Fred

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That crazy puppy. He's such a nutball. Tonight he caught some kind of big *ss bug that started squawking when Fred chomped down on it and he ran all around the yard to try and get away from it. But it was in his mouth. It took him about 3 laps to figure it out. lol It was hilarious.

weirdness: puppy & wd-40

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I have this puppy and I discovered a couple of weeks ago that he is terrified of WD-40. Then I forgot his intense fear and used it again this evening. So, weird. Why would a little puppy be so scared of WD-40?

first ticket

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I just got my first traffic ticket in years and years. It's been so long that I can't even remember.

What next?

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Linux was an exciting journey till now. I used Ubuntu Hardy from its inception till the start of New year 2011. The "learning" part was not so great, as i later understood it, and assumed that it was meant for closing the windows and opening the door towards Linux-ification of the world. After pursuit of (slightly) bigger adventures, now I am high and dry.

A Fishy Tale

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Not to be taken too seriously/technically, this post tries to make a common man understand what the names resemble.

Mac is like a big aquarium. It is a kind of show-off and sure enuf, increases your charisma in....

Windows is like a bucket half filled with water. The bucket is some micro-particles-containing soft material. Initially, you are sorta content...

Linux is like an ocean. Water keeps coming from the rivers, and there are a lot of rivers around. There is much to see if you want to, while...

More Hardware troubles

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Well, it's not been my month for hardware. Or rather, had I fixed it right the first time...

gave it up

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Well, folks, she died on me. That failing hard drive finally gave up the ghost, so things will be a bit slow around Tuxmachines today.

Printer Woes

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The last day of this year in Southern Oregon is sunny, clear, and cold. Sitting here and basking in the morning sun streaming through the window mitigates my foul mood regarding the state of printers.

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