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How far off is a Star Trek level of Language Translation?

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If you watch this video it shows Google Translate doing its stuff translating between two Languages. Its pretty obvious that despite years of desktops trying to push text to speech, voice control and similar translate offerings its obvious this is a battle which moving forward is going to be fought on the mobile platforms.

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How I customized my Android..

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There is no doubt that Android as a Mobile OS is gaining traction, with a slew of enterprise apps on the horizon, a good number of apps in its app store and the closest competition either Palm OS or Blackberry's offering it can only be a good future for the little green robot.

When you buy Android on a mobile however, you are not always guaranteed to get the same experience across a Samsung, HTC or Motorola who all take the stock google provided Operating System and add their own twist and apps to it.

One of the reasons the OS is popular is the simple fact that you can take what your Mobile phone vendor has done with the phone and throw it away and start again.

I'd like to share with you what i've done on my Samsung Galaxy S in three areas:

Find Out how...

Google's Android Market is better than the Apple App Store

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With the battle for the mobile space heating up and Apple and Google supplying the outright elite of the pack with IOS and Android respectively.

Battles such as this are won and lost with Apps, Palm, Blackberry both have found that despite having quality apps for the usual suspects, the quantity is a part of the reason why, in Palms case specifically a superior Mobile OS has limped in every time (ok, poort hardware, lacklustre marketing, and a terrible price point all caused HP/Palm WebOS issues)

When it comes to the App stores of IOS and Android i belive Android has the edge for a few simple reasons.

Find Out how...

My 20 Most Used Android Apps.

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It seems almost obligatory to do some form of App List and as such these are my personally most used Apps on my Android Mobile.

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Shout out on my blog to Tuxmachines..

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Thought i'd put a shout out for Tuxmachines on my blog, the feedback and interactivity i've had from the readers on this site is amazing.

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Tiny USB Stick Brings Android to PCs, TVs

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FXI essentially built an ultra-lean computer inside a small USB stick. Stick it into any device that supports USB storage, and Cotton Candy will register as a USB drive. From there, you can run the Android OS in a secure environment inside your desktop, courtesy of a Windows/OSX/Linux-compatible virtualization client embedded in the device.

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Alfred.. An app launcher for the Mac..

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There is an old quote, "you don't need to know the information, just where to find it" and when it comes to your computer that is never more true than today. We have local apps, web apps, cloud data, websites information all over the place.

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Why i'm just about ready to trade in my iPad for an Android Tablet

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I've been an iPad user from Day one, however I'm starting to feel that while the Apple Tablet has a future and no one can argue that. I'm looking to migrate to an Android Device.

Find Out Why

Sonic the Hedgehog went OpenSource?

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Turns out that there is an Open source version of Sonic the Hedgehog and its available on Linux.. (and Windows) I'm really now sure how this is available, if Sega Opened the code? However it's here and it plays quite well...

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Items to put in a laptop bag to make travel easier

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This post is more than a little inspired by a Lifehacker Post where they cover a similar idea.. Got me to thinking, What bag do i use, and what do i put in it for tech stuff when travelling. I'll state right now this drives my wife nuts. However I only take one pair of shoes and half the clothes she doesw ith me, so i guess it evens out.. Wink

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More in Tux Machines

Latest Progress on KDE Themes and KTechLab

  • Week report 0

    Hello every one in the KDE planet and beyond, this is the progress weekly report on O². So The week surprisingly started Monday and after the initial chock and accompanying usual work day at KDAB, I decided to do a little bit of progress on O² style mock ups...

  • Announcing KTechLab 0.50.0

    I’m happy to announce KTechLab release version 0.50.0. KTechLab is an IDE for microcontrollers and electronics. In this new release every user-visible functionality is the same as in previous releases, however, the codebase of KTechLab has been updated, so now it is a KF5/Qt5 application and it does not depend anymore on KDELibs4Support libraries. This release should compile and run on systems where KDELibs4Support libraries are not available. In its current state KTechLab’s codebase is ready for fixes and enhancements, as it only depends on modern libraries like KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5) and Qt5. As a side note, KF6 and Qt6 have been announced, and the first release of Qt6 has been scheduled to the end of 2020.

  • KTechLab git master doesn't depend on deprecated Qt5/KF5 API anymore

    KTechLab git master doesn’t depend anymore on deprecated Qt5/KF5 APIs. Thank you for everybody who made this possible! Using only up-to-date APIs should help with long-term maintenance of KTechLab and probably it helps distributors of KTechLab, too.

Review: Garuda Linux 200817

One of the more recent additions to the DistroWatch database is Garuda Linux, an Arch-based distribution that offers several enticing features. By default Garuda is intended to be run on the Btr file system, which offers all sorts of attractive features such as multi-disk storage volumes and snapshots. Btrfs has been paired with Timeshift on Garuda and the system is reported to take automatic snapshots before each package upgrade, making the system much easier to recover. I especially like the idea of having automated filesystem snapshots on a rolling release distribution such as Arch. The openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release has offered automatic snapshots of the system prior to upgrades for a while now and it is nice to see this feature catching on in other projects. The Garuda distribution ships with the Calamares system installer to make setting up the operating system easier. We are also given a desktop tool for managing drivers and Garuda's website mentions proprietary NVIDIA video drivers are optionally available. Rounding out some of the key features, Garuda ships with the Zen Linux kernel with the goal of providing better desktop performance. Read more

Linux 5.9-rc6

  • Linux 5.9-rc6
    Another week, another rc, and things look fairly normal: the diffstat
    looks fairly flat (implying small changes) and we don't have any
    unusual amount of activity.
    
    The one thing that does show up in the diffstat is the softscroll
    removal (both fbcon and vgacon), and there are people who want to save
    that, but we'll see if some maintainer steps up. I'm not willing to
    resurrect it in the broken form it was in, so I doubt that will happen
    in 5.9, but we'll see what happens.
    
    The other stats also look normal: about 60% of the patch is drivers
    (and yes, the softscroll is a noticeable part, but not overwhelmingly
    so - there's sound, gpu, mtd, i2c, usb etc). And the usual arch
    updates, along with some vm fixes (including the fix for the
    performance regression noted last rc) and perf tooling updates.
    
    We also have a (test regression (not the performance one) in the VM
    that we know about - the test that triggers this was admittedly buggy,
    but if the test was buggy it is quite possible that real uses are
    buggy too. We don't actually have any known case of any such real user
    breakage, but we do have a nice fix for the test regression that is
    very  much the RightThing(tm) to do in the long run, so that has been
    actively discussed.
    
    We know what the fix looks like, and a few initial patches have been
    floating around, but a final patch doesn't exist yet, and depending on
    how that goes this might be something that pushes out the final 5.9 by
    a week. We'll see.
    
    So there's still some development going on, but honestly, that VM case
    is a very odd corner case that normal users should never hit, so it
    should not keep anybody from testing this in the meantime.
    
    Holler if you see anything odd,
    
                      Linus
    
  • Linux 5.9-rc6 Released With Soft Scrollback Removed, Performance Regression Fixed

    The sixth weekly release candidate to Linux 5.9 is now available with at least two notable changes in particular. Prominent in Linux 5.9-rc6 is the fix for the previously reported performance regression hitting 5.9. In case you missed it from the end of last week, see the article on controlling page lock unfairness as part of addressing the performance regression. That code is now in Linux 5.9-rc6 and the performance is back on track with Linux 5.8 while I will have out more benchmark numbers soon on the revised Linux 5.8 vs. 5.9 performance state.

  • Kernel prepatch 5.9-rc6

    The 5.9-rc6 kernel prepatch is out.

today's leftovers

  • Fair Code vs Open Source, Which Wins The Future?

    When developers release their software as open source, they are also giving a by-definition right to every company in the world to commercially use their software without having to obtain a license or share some profits with them. And this caused some problems in the open source world few years ago. For example, Amazon took the MongoDB source code (An open source database system), changed its name and then provided it as a SaaS (Software-as-a-Service) on its AWS platform, and then charged people money to use it. MongoDB developers were angered since they literally got nothing back from Amazon although they are the original creators of 100% of the code. This adds some sustainability problems to open source projects, as anybody and any company can just take the code and then reuse it commercially without giving anything back to the original developers. The original developers may starve and the project may stop, and there would be no obligation by anyone to commercially pay them. Fair code initiative arose from this context; To prevent anyone from using the software commercially without contacting the original software authors first, making it under the umbrella of what’s known as source-available models.

  • How to Convert a Project to REUSE Compatible License Statements?

    This blog post provides a step-by-step example about how the conversion of a project to REUSE compatible license statements is done in practice. For my setup, I have a readily configured kdesrc-build environment. First, I get out the most recent source code if the project I want to convert. For this tutorial, I use KTurtle, which is a nice and small application from KDE Education with just about 200 files.

  • Best Python Data Science Libraries
  • John Cook: Descartes and Toolz

    I was looking recently at the Python module toolz, a collection of convenience functions. A lot of these functions don’t do that much. They don’t save you much code, but they do make your code more readable by making it more declarative. You may not realize need them until you see them. For example, there is a function partitionby that breaks up a sequence at the points where a given function’s value changes. I’m pretty sure that function would have improved some code I’ve written recently, making it more declarative than procedural, but I can’t remember what that was. Although I can’t think of my previous example, I can think of a new one, and that is Descartes’ rule of signs.

  • How big data forced the hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence to evolve

    Interest in SETI can be used to bring the public into science as well. A recent collaboration between the SETI Institute and the open-source software project GNU Radio aims to give people the opportunity to learn about radio engineering, digital signal processing, and radio astronomy. By purchasing a dongle for around $25, members of the public can digitize analog radio signals and process signals on their computers.        

  • Getting credit: Taking your place in a meritocracy

    Dealing with either of those incredibly frustrating situations without appearing petty is difficult. But getting credit for your ideas and work is critical in today's organizational environments, especially those that aspire to be well-functioning meritocracies. Promotions, bonuses, and other forms of recognition (such as the opportunity to lead the project you proposed) are all generally based on performance. If people don't know you contributed, you'll likely be continually overlooked.

  • Battlefield 4 On Linux | Ubuntu 20.04 | Steam Play

    Battlefield 4 running through Steam Play on Linux.